Big Think
Big Think is the leading source of expert-driven, actionable, educational content -- with thousands of videos, featuring experts ranging from Bill Clinton to Bill Nye, we help you get smarter, faster. We aim to help you explore the big ideas and core skills that define knowledge in the 21st century, so you can apply them to the questions and challenges in your own life.

1587 videos
Longer lifespans: A coming crisis or reason to celebrate? | Ashton Applewhite Longer lifespans: A coming crisis or reason to celebrate? | Ashton Applewhite
1 day ago En
- A huge segment of America's population — the Baby Boom generation — is aging and will live longer than any American generation in history. - The story we read about in the news? Their drain on social services like Social Security and Medicare. - But increased longevity is a cause for celebration, says Ashton Applewhite, not doom and gloom. Ashton Applewhite is a Brooklyn-based activist and writer. Her latest book, This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism, debunks many myths about late life (https://goo.gl/Ln6idn) Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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What evidence is there that animals are conscious beings? | Frans de Waal What evidence is there that animals are conscious beings? | Frans de Waal
2 days ago En
Consciousness has long been difficult to define, whether you're a biologist, neuroscientist, or philosopher. So Frans de Waal looks at what actions humans take that require conscious thought. Comparing them to actions in certain animals suggests consciousness is not a human trait alone. Frans de Waal is a Dutch/American biologist and primatologist. He teaches at Emory University and directs the Living Links Center for the Study of Ape and Human Evolution, in Atlanta, Georgia. He is known for his popular books, such as Chimpanzee Politics (1982), Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape (1997) and The Age of Empathy (2009). He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences. His latest book is Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves (https://goo.gl/6Me8HG) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/animal-consciousness Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Jillian Michaels’ 12-hour rule: A guide to healthier headspace Jillian Michaels’ 12-hour rule: A guide to healthier headspace
3 days ago En
- There's no shortage of good advice in the world. But how to actually follow it? - When it comes to your own wellbeing, learn to schedule your 'me time' with precision. - Only this way, says Jillian Michaels, can you center yourself and retain a sense of joy. Jillian Michaels has been a fitness expert and wellness coach for over 20 years. In addition, she owned and operated a sports medicine facility, where she worked as a physical therapy aide under the physiatrists, physical therapists, and chiropractors. Jillian's passion for fitness training originates from 17 years of martial arts practice in Muay Thai and Akarui-Do, in which she holds a black belt. Since 1993, Jillian has held two personal training certificates from the leading certification programs in the country: the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. In addition she is Kettlebell Concepts certified. Jillian has also developed a continuing education series for trainers with AFAA and holds a nutrition and wellness consultant certificate with the American Fitness Professionals and Associates. Books, DVDs, and video games — Jillian has them all covered. She is a New York Times bestselling author of numerous books including Master Your Metabolism, Unlimited: How to Build an Exceptional Life, and her most recent bestselling release, Slim for Life: My Insider Secrets To Simple, Fast, And Lasting Weight Loss. Her first comprehensive 90-day weight loss system, Jillian Michaels Body Revolution is available in retail stores across North America, and JILLIAN MICHAELS BODYSHRED, an intense group fitness class based on Jillian's highly-effective 3-2-1 interval system, is currently taught in Crunch gyms and the YMCA in the US, exclusively at GoodLife Fitness in Canada, and is and expanding further worldwide this year. Michaels' latest book is "The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty" (https://goo.gl/D69uL4) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/well-being Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why the Parker Solar Probe is NASA's most exciting mission | Michelle Thaller Why the Parker Solar Probe is NASA's most exciting mission | Michelle Thaller
4 days ago En
- The Parker Solar Probe is set to uncover a mystery about the sun: Why is it's corona hotter than its surface? - NASA's ability to fly a probe so close to the sun is a marvel of engineering. - Michelle Thaller, an astronomer at NASA, explains why the Parker Solar Probe is so hot right now. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/parker-solar-probe Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Big Think Edge: A new way to get smarter, faster | Victoria Brown Big Think Edge: A new way to get smarter, faster | Victoria Brown
5 days ago En
We’ve got big news. Big Think Edge, previously only available to employees at select companies, is now available to individual subscribers. You can view a selection of our experts here - and join instantly - easy! (https://edge.bigthink.com/users/sign_up) Soft skills are more important than ever in today’s professional world. According to the LinkedIn Releases 2019 Global Talent Trends Report, 92% of talented professionals and hiring managers agree that candidates with strong soft skills are increasingly important. Don’t miss out on what companies like the NBA, Citi, and Kimberly-Clark are offering their employees to keep them ahead of the curve. Subscribe to Big Think Edge today!
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Why we prefer people just like us. And why that’s potentially dangerous. | Nicholas Christakis Why we prefer people just like us. And why that’s potentially dangerous. | Nicholas Christakis
6 days ago En
- It's common for people to form groups of like minded individuals who also have similar abilities. - Evolution confers advantages on heterogeneous groups of people and groups with diverse talent sets. - Prizing individual identity ahead of group identity also helps counteract tribalistic politics. Nicholas A. Christakis is a physician, sociologist, and director of the Human Nature Lab at Yale University, where he is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society (https://amzn.to/2VpXp3S) Follow him on Twitter @NAChristakis Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/tribalism-politics Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Climate denial isn’t stopping climate action. Here’s what is. | David Wallace-Wells Climate denial isn’t stopping climate action. Here’s what is. | David Wallace-Wells
1 week ago En
Climate change denial draws headlines. But is it actually an obstacle to climate action? A great majority of Americans say they're concerned about climate change. The real roadblock is our unwillingness to pay money to help stop climate change. David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine. He was previously the deputy editor of The Paris Review. He lives in New York City. His latest book is The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming (https://goo.gl/ih35YX) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/climate-denial Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How to live with grace and grit | Former NASA astronaut Leland Melvin How to live with grace and grit | Former NASA astronaut Leland Melvin
1 week ago En
- Former NASA astronaut Leland Melvin is the only person to catch a pass in the NFL and in space. - Here, he shares his thoughts on living in a state of grace and advocating for justice. - Humanity's future is among the stars and to get there, we'll need everyone's diverse talents. A former wide receiver for the Detroit Lions, Leland Melvin is an engineer and NASA astronaut. He served on the space shuttle Atlantis as a mission specialist and was named the NASA Associate Administrator for Education in October 2010. He is the author of Chasing Space: An Astronaut's Story of Grit, Grace, and Second Chances (https://amzn.to/2D9dBzz) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/grace Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Grace is a way that you live your life. We all go through life and we have these different journeys and we meander in different ways in and out and ebb and flow, but grace is a way of appreciating the people that are around you, the things that are around you and how you interact with them in a way that's meaningful, that's purposeful, that's intentional. You live it in an intentional way you don't just hey write someone off and just keep moving, everyone has a purpose on this planet and we can learn something from everyone. I mean I learn something every day from my dog. I learned patience. I learn things from people that I would have never of expected to learn something the janitor or whomever it is. And so moving through life in this graceful way of embracing everything around you so. Before I could read my mother read to me every night two books: The Little Engine That Could, I think I can, I think I can, and Curious George looking up curiosity. And I'll never forget I was this little kid on the football team, the smallest kid probably. I could run fast but no one ever expected me to play in the NFL and I never imagined to play in the NFL because I was just this small little kid. But having this never give up I think I can, I think I can mentality is a gritty way of ensuring that you're going to reach the dreams and goals that you have. Sometimes people don't have expectations for you because they see you are from a certain neighborhood or a certain ZIP Code or whatever and you're looked at as this kid, "Well you're never going to be an astronaut because you're from that ZIP Code." And college, the SATs to get you in college only predict the first and second year success, it doesn't predict if you're going to graduate or how well you're going to do past the first and second year. So if we're going to try to build this civilization, future civilization, Mars, moon, wherever we're going to go we want to do it with as many people as we can that have these creative ideas and our diversity. And that means that we've got to make sure that we educate everyone. And I have a graphic that says you have three little boys all standing on a box, they're trying to look at the game. The little boy in the blue shirt he can't see the game because he's too short, that's equality. But justice is when you have what you need. When he gets two boxes he can see the game. One of the kids doesn't even need a box, but he gets a box anyway. So let's not be equal, let's give justice and give you what you need so that you can see the game.
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I invested in Facebook. By 2016, I couldn’t stay silent. | Roger McNamee I invested in Facebook. By 2016, I couldn’t stay silent. | Roger McNamee
1 week ago En
Why an early Facebook investor is now Facebook's biggest critic. - Investor Roger McNamee joined Facebook as an early investor when the company was just two years old. - In this video, he explains why he went from Facebook supporter to public critic, and why he came to write the book "Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe". - The next billion dollars Facebook makes means nothing if it doesn't reform its practices, says McNamee. Roger McNamee has been a Silicon Valley investor for 35 years. He co-founded successful funds in venture, crossover and private equity. His most recent fund, Elevation, included U2's Bono as a co-founder. He holds a B.A. from Yale University and an M.B.A. from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is the author Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe (https://goo.gl/re2n9H) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/i-invested-in-facebook-by-2016-i-couldnt-stay-silent Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The biggest change to manhood? Equal parenting. | Michael Kaufman The biggest change to manhood? Equal parenting. | Michael Kaufman
1 week ago En
Being a successful caregiver is part of today's definition of manhood - The biggest example of a change in men's gendered behavior in recent years is the transformation of fatherhood. Nowadays, the definition of manhood has increasingly included being a present, and good caregiver. - Women have historically been burdened with childcare and housework. So much so that they usually longer off time off for parental leave. Also, they're the ones tending to take off work if their kid is sick. Because of this heavy role in parenting, many women have not been able to advance far in the workforce. - By men doing half of the care work, it's boosted women's empowerment. It's also great for children's emotional development and well-being. It's also great for men, too, because, as a result of being a successful caregiver, men are more likely to build up a sense of empathy, which can help them in leadership positions. Michael Kaufman, PhD, is the co-founder of the White Ribbon Campaign, the largest effort in the world of men working to end violence against women. As a writer and speaker, he has worked across America and in almost 50 countries, including extensively with the United Nations, numerous governments, NGOs, and businesses. He is the author or editor of eight books on gender issues, on democracy and development studies, including The Guy's Guide to Feminism, Theorizing Masculinities, and most recently, "The Time Has Come: Why Men Must Join the Gender Equality Revolution." (https://amzn.to/2uxbLnl) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/manhood Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Big Think is evolving. Learn habits of mind from the world’s greatest thinkers. | Peter Hopkins Big Think is evolving. Learn habits of mind from the world’s greatest thinkers. | Peter Hopkins
1 week ago En
At Big Think, we capture the thoughts of the world's most brilliant thinkers. You want to thrive, so why accept anything but the best? Big Think Edge brings a diverse collection of the world's top thinkers and doers directly to you. Learn more: https://edge.bigthink.com/users/sign_up - Instantly access 50+ world-class lessons. - Face-to-face mentorship experience. - Instructional design guides your learning. Peter Hopkins is the co-founder and president of Big Think, the knowledge company that makes people and companies smarter, faster through efficient e-learning from world-renowned experts. As president, Hopkins sets the vision for Big Think's content strategy that enables the world's top visionaries to share big ideas shaping the 21st century at BigThink.com and offer their e-wisdom needed for a competitive edge in the knowledge economy. Peter directs the company's individual and corporate e-learning solutions, including Edge, which helps Fortune 100 companies attract, develop and retain top talent at all levels. Prior to founding Big Think along with fellow Harvard alum Victoria Brown, Hopkins was a Producer for the "Charlie Rose" show on PBS, where he oversaw the American politics segments and collaborated with Google to make the show's entire back catalogue of episodes available online. An entrepreneur and expert on e-learning, Hopkins has made appearances on NPR, CNN, and "The Colbert Report." He is a cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Harvard University, where he received a BA Political Economy and was an editor and member of the Executive Board at The Crimson. Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Always dreamed of flying? On these moons, you can. | Michelle Thaller Always dreamed of flying? On these moons, you can. | Michelle Thaller
1 week ago En
There are places in our solar system where you can fly. - Both the moon and Mars have a weaker surface gravity than the Earth does. The result? You don't weigh as much on either celestial body as you do here. - On a moon called Titan that orbits Saturn, the gravity isn't as strong as Earth's, but the atmosphere is much thicker. In this world, it would be possible to strap wings to your arms and fly around. - On a low-gravity moon called Miranda, just off the space coast of Uranus, there are cliffs that are many miles high. It would be possible to jump off a cliff here and fall very gently to the bottom. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/always-dreamed-of-flying-on-these-moons-you-can Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The average lifespan of a friendship? 10 years. Here’s why. | Nicholas Christakis The average lifespan of a friendship? 10 years. Here’s why. | Nicholas Christakis
1 week ago En
This is the psychology of why friendships (and marriages) fail. - Some friendships last a lifetime, but most have a lifespan. In the U.S., best friends tend to last for 10 years on average, says Nicholas Christakis. - In friendships, one person may begin to defect or "free ride", which causes the other person to choose between cooperation or defection. People tend to choose the latter so they won't be taken advantage of. - A certain amount of social fluidity, taking a breather from a friendship, can actually make a friendship last longer. Nicholas A. Christakis is a physician, sociologist, and director of the Human Nature Lab at Yale University, where he is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society (https://amzn.to/2VpXp3S). Follow him on Twitter @NAChristakis Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/the-typical-lifespan-of-a-friendship-10-years-heres-why Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why the 'alpha male' stereotype is wrong | Frans de Waal Why the 'alpha male' stereotype is wrong | Frans de Waal
2 weeks ago En
Big and strong? That's not what makes an alpha male, says primatolgist Frans de Waal. - The cultural notion of an alpha male as a strong, mean aggressor is rampant but wrong. The reality is more complex. - Frans de Waal notes two types of alpha males: Bullies and leaders. In chimpanzee society, the former terrorizes the group while the latter mediates conflict. - The reign of alpha male bullies usually ends poorly in the wild. Chimpanzee bullies get expelled or even killed by their group, while leader alphas are somewhat democratically kept in power, sometimes for as long as 12 years. Frans de Waal is a Dutch/American biologist and primatologist. He teaches at Emory University and directs the Living Links Center for the Study of Ape and Human Evolution, in Atlanta, Georgia. He is known for his popular books, such as Chimpanzee Politics (1982), Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape (1997) and The Age of Empathy (2009). He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences. His latest book is Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves (https://goo.gl/6Me8HG) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-the-alpha-male-stereotype-is-wrong Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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700,000 people get out of prison each year. Let’s hire them. | Johnny C. Taylor, Jr. 700,000 people get out of prison each year. Let’s hire them. | Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.
2 weeks ago En
The U.S. has a talent shortage and the formerly incarcerated have paid their debt to society. Let's solve two problems with one idea. - The U.S. has a talent shortage. There are 7.3 million open jobs, and only 6 million people currently looking for jobs, says President and CEO of SHRM Johnny C. Taylor, Jr. - The solution? Let the formerly incarcerated work good jobs that contribute to the economy. - SHRM research shows that 80% of HR managers are interested and willing to hire the formerly incarcerated. The bias exists at the employee and customer level – but that bias is changing fast for the better. Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the world's largest HR professional society. As a global leader on human capital, culture and leadership, Mr. Taylor is a sought-after voice by C-suite executives as well as state and federal elected policymakers on all matters affecting work, workers and the workplace. He is frequently invited to testify before Congress on critical workforce issues—from sexual harassment to paid leave—and authors a weekly column, "Ask HR," in USA Today, the country's largest newspaper. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/700-000-people-get-out-of-prison-each-year-lets-hire-them Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why Blackwater cannot be the future of U.S. warfare | Sean McFate Why Blackwater cannot be the future of U.S. warfare | Sean McFate
2 weeks ago En
Can 6,500 mercenaries "fix" Afghanistan? The U.S. is resurrecting privatized warfare. - The West has stopped winning wars because it still operates on WWII strategies, says Sean McFate. Poor strategy results in so-called 'forever wars'. - To end the nearly 20-year-long war in Afghanistan, the U.S. is considering replacing all U.S. troops with Blackwater mercenaries. - Why is that so dangerous? Because this is what the future looks like when you resurrect privatized warfare. Dr. Sean McFate is an adviser to Oxford University's Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, as well as a professor of strategy at the National Defense University and Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Washington, DC. He is the author of several books, including Shadow War, The Modern Mercenary, and most recently The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder (https://amzn.to/2OIlwbp) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-blackwater-cannot-be-the-future-of-u-s-warfare Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Knowing how to behave in the #MeToo era | Michael Kaufman Knowing how to behave in the #MeToo era | Michael Kaufman
2 weeks ago En
Harassment isn't about your intention. It's about your impact, explains Michael Kaufman. - In the #MeToo era, many men feel they're walking on eggshells and can't say anything anymore. - Companies must refocus their policies away from 1,000 page "don't do this" manuals and address the gray areas that are most confusing, like: Can you give a colleague a compliment? - Workplace harassment training should focus on the principle that sexual harassment is about impact of your words or actions; it's not about your intention. Michael Kaufman, PhD, is the co-founder of the White Ribbon Campaign, the largest effort in the world of men working to end violence against women. As a writer and speaker, he has worked across America and in almost 50 countries, including extensively with the United Nations, numerous governments, NGOs, and businesses. He is the author or editor of eight books on gender issues, on democracy and development studies, including The Guy's Guide to Feminism, Theorizing Masculinities, and most recently, "The Time Has Come: Why Men Must Join the Gender Equality Revolution." (https://amzn.to/2uxbLnl) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/knowing-how-to-behave-in-the-metoo-era Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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This is not what an atom really looks like | Michelle Thaller This is not what an atom really looks like | Michelle Thaller
2 weeks ago En
Artistic depictions of the atom have deceived us all. - Though artistic renderings suggest otherwise, electrons do not, in fact, move around a nucleus the same way the planets move around a star — at all. - Electrons also are not tiny balls, they're more wavelike. Also, in regard to their location, a single electron can also be an entire sphere around the nucleus of an atom. - As for their movement, electrons do have a spin, but they're not actually spinning. They're not actually moving around. You can think of them as clouds that exist in different locations around the nucleus based on how much energy they have. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/atom-appearance Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Are you wasting time? Ask this question to find out. | Gretchen Rubin Are you wasting time? Ask this question to find out. | Gretchen Rubin
2 weeks ago En
Gretchen Rubin is the author of many books, including the block-buster New York Times bestsellers The Four Tendencies, Better Than Before, and The Happiness Project. She also has a top-ranked, award-winning podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin, and a popular blog, gretchenrubin.com. She lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters. Rubin's latest book is "Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness" (https://goo.gl/QBXWck) Whether at home, or at the office, or anywhere where you're part of a process where you're trying to get something done, it's very useful, at least every once in a while, to ask yourself, why am I doing this? So, if I'm doing something to benefit other people, to make their work easier, are they actually taking advantage of it? If I'm writing a summary of what I just created, is anybody using that summary? Because maybe at one time somebody used the summary, but no one's using it now. Or maybe I just started doing this and assumed that it was useful to other people. But they aren't actually using it. Maybe I've created work that doesn't actually need to be done. Now, sometimes too, we want to make things more beautiful than they need to be. Now, beautiful tools make work a joy. And it is more pleasurable to work with files when the files are neat and organized, or when the binders all match and are all lined up, and look great. Absolutely. But there is a point where that can swallow us up, and we can spend too much time on things that are too fleeting or that don't really go to the aim that we're trying to achieve. And you want to think about if people are just going to be using these binders for 10 minutes, do I really want to spend 30 minutes making them look right? Sometimes the answer might be it's totally worth it. But sometimes maybe we could use some kind of more makeshift solution. It might get us where we need to go and save us a lot of time and energy. Because what we want to do as we're creating outer order is we really want to be purposeful with our time, and our energy, and our possessions. We want to do the things that matter, that do the things that take us where we want to go, and create the environment in which we want to live. But we don't want to let ourselves get consumed or choked with tasks that really, in the end, don't need to be done at all. Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The internet made us weird – just not in the right way | Douglas Rushkoff The internet made us weird – just not in the right way | Douglas Rushkoff
2 weeks ago En
Have swipes and scrolls replaced deep thinking? - Technological advancements were supposed to free up our time and free up our minds, leading to a cognitive surplus. That hasn't happened, says Douglas Rushkoff. - The digital media environment deals in absolutes: yes or no; thumbs up or thumbs down. Chasing weird uncertainties and lines of thought is not a trademark of today's culture. - More time should equal more thought. But humanity seems to be swiping left on true cognitive engagement. So, asks Douglas Rushkoff, has the internet made us smarter, or just busier? Douglas Rushkoff is the host of the Team Human podcast and a professor of digital economics at CUNY/Queens. He is also the author of a dozen bestselling books on media, technology, and culture, including, Present Shock, Program or Be Programmed, Media Virus, and Team Human, the last of which is his latest work (https://goo.gl/QmibYm). Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/the-internet-made-us-weird-just-not-in-the-right-way Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why people (and chimps) throw temper tantrums | Frans de Waal Why people (and chimps) throw temper tantrums | Frans de Waal
2 weeks ago En
Primatologist Frans de Waal explains the primal instinct that unites humans and chimpanzees. - Humans throw temper tantrums when they feel frustrated, lose power, or sense a threat to their status or security. - Chimpanzees exhibit the same behavior; alpha male chimps who lose their status throw tantrums to elicit sympathy from their group, hoping to have their power restored. - But that tactic almost never works, notes primatologist Frans de Waal. An important lesson for humans from chimps. Frans de Waal is a Dutch/American biologist and primatologist. He teaches at Emory University and directs the Living Links Center for the Study of Ape and Human Evolution, in Atlanta, Georgia. He is known for his popular books, such as Chimpanzee Politics (1982), Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape (1997) and The Age of Empathy (2009). He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences. His latest book is Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves (https://goo.gl/6Me8HG) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-people-and-chimps-throw-temper-tantrums Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Masculinity is in crisis. Who’s to blame? | Michael Kaufman Masculinity is in crisis. Who’s to blame? | Michael Kaufman
3 weeks ago En
• Male power is a paradox, says Michael Kaufman, author of "The Time Has Come: Why Men Must Join the Gender Equality Revolution." (https://amzn.to/2uxbLnl) • Society is male-dominated, yet despite their advantages men still die younger than women, are more likely to commit suicide, to be in prison, and to be addicted to drugs. • There is a growing movement that blames women for the so-called attack on masculinity, but Kaufman doesn't buy it. He blames the society that established uneven power in the first place, which naturally has friction in today's world. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/masculinity-is-in-crisis-whos-to-blame Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink TRANSCRIPT MICHAEL KAUFMAN: If you went out onto the street and asked most men about their power, most men would look at you like you're crazy and, say, 'Power? Me? Are you kidding?' So why is there this disconnect between the real world of men's power, that still exists in spite of some real progress, and the experience of individual men? Well I think it's a few things. One is that when we have forms of privilege or power it tends to be invisible to us. As a man I don't have to think about certain things. I don't have to think about if I'm 30 years old going in for a job interview and someone thinking, 'Oh, 30 years old, he's probably going to become pregnant.' Even though, these days, of course, as a dad I'd be an equal parent. There's a lot of ways that men still have power it's often invisible to us. But I think there's also something even more interesting, and that's what I think of as the paradox of men's power. The ways that we have defined men's power, the ways we raise boys to be men, come with a set of expectations that none of us can live up to. You know, we're supposed to be strong and powerful, in control, you know, make money, be the bread earner, have incredibly ripped bodies like a Marvel cartoon, not show feelings, not have feelings. And we punish boys, we punish boys for showing those feelings, for showing emotions. You know, a boy falls down and cries and you know we drag him back up, 'big boys don't cry, don't be a baby.' And so we just pummel boys and men for not living up to these impossible expectations and stereotypes of manhood. And yet as individual men we just assume, well, that's what a man is. And so there's this internal dialogue of self-doubt about making the masculine grade. And you know what that ends up being is it men end up being a bit torn apart. And I don't just mean metaphorically. I mean, you know, men die younger than women because we don't go for help, we don't go to doctors, we don't get emotional support. Men are more likely to be addicted to alcohol and other drugs, are more likely to be in prison, we're more likely to commit suicide, we're more likely to die of opioids. So all these different things are the result of a male-dominated society. It's a strange paradox. Can you imagine designing a world yourself in which your half of the species had more power, had more control, ran social institutions, random religions, ran the economy, and you set it up in a way that you'd also die younger, you'd also have all these personal failings? Now there are some men these days who blame women on the plight the men are facing. There's some men who say, you know, the pendulum has shifted too far, men are the real victims. I don't buy it. I don't buy it at all. I don't think women are to blame for the pain, the plight, that men do feel. They've been brought up with a set of promises and expectations. You know, if you do all these things, if you just suck it up, if you just be a man you'll be rewarded. You know, you'll be work rewarded with jobs and sex and social acclaim or whatever it might be. Well, the world doesn't work like that. It doesn't work like that period, but it particularly doesn't work like that nowadays. The world has changed. And so men can't just come along assuming, well, it's still going to just all be in my favor. I mean, we've had this 8,000 or 10,000 year long affirmative action program for men, and that's the way it's been. You know, men haven't had to compete with half of the species for jobs, for positions of power or influence. We've gotten to rule the roost and call the shots. And the rug has been pulled out from under that. And it's not women to blame. It's not women to blame. It's the society that devised that whole mess in the first place.
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Universal basic income: The plan to give $12,000 to every American adult | Andrew Yang Universal basic income: The plan to give $12,000 to every American adult | Andrew Yang
3 weeks ago En
Tax megacorps like Amazon to fund universal basic income, says 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang. - Andrew Yang is running for president in 2020 as a Democrat (https://www.yang2020.com). - The Freedom Dividend is a universal basic income proposal initiated by 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang. - Yang's plan would give $1,000 a month, or $12,000 per year, to every American over the age of 18, every year. This would get every U.S. adult just below the poverty line which is currently $12,770 a year. - How would it be funded? Yang suggests a value added tax on megacorps like Amazon (which paid zero tax last year). Funnel that money back into the American's people's hands to boost the economy, improve mental health, increase education and lower violence. Andrew Yang is an entrepreneur and author who is running for President as a Democrat in 2020. In his book The War on Normal People (https://goo.gl/rgv3bz), he explains the mounting crisis of the automation of labor and makes the case for the Freedom Dividend, a Universal Basic Income of $1,000 a month for every American as well as other policies to progress to the next stage of capitalism. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/universal-basic-income Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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For a long time, the West shaped the world. That time is over. | Parag Khanna For a long time, the West shaped the world. That time is over. | Parag Khanna
3 weeks ago En
The 21st century is experiencing an Asianization of politics, business, and culture. - Our theories about the world, even about history or the geopolitics of the present, tend to be shaped by Anglo perspectives of the Western industrial democracies, particularly those in the United States and the United Kingdom. - The West, however, is not united. Canada, for instance, acts in many ways that are not in line with American or British policies, particularly in regard to populism. Even if it were united, though, it would not represent most of the world's population. - European ideas, such as parliamentary democracy and civil service, spread across the world in the 19th century. In the 20th century, American values such as entrepreneurialism went global. In the 21st century, however, what we're seeing now is an Asianization — Asian confidence that they can determine their own political systems, their own models, and adapt to their own circumstances. Dr. Parag Khanna is Managing Partner of FutureMap. His books include "The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century" (https://goo.gl/tN3sbp). He is also author of "The Second World" (2008), "How to Run the World" (2011), and "Connectography" (2016). He is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/global-asianization Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years | David Wallace-Wells Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years | David Wallace-Wells
3 weeks ago En
• Coral reefs may not be able to survive another human decade because of the environmental stress we have placed on them, says author David Wallace-Wells. He posits that without meaningful changes to policies, the trend of them dying out, even in light of recent advances, will continue. • The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. On top of this, recent studies suggest that insect populations may have fallen by as much as 75 percent over the last few decades. • If it were not for our oceans, the planet would probably be already several degrees warmer than it is today due to the emissions we've expelled into the atmosphere. David Wallace-Wells is the author of "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming" (https://amzn.to/2Of5N3y). Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine. He was previously the deputy editor of The Paris Review. He lives in New York City. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/climate-change-ocean Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink TRANSCRIPT DAVID WALLACE-WELLS: I think there's basically no chance that coral reefs survive another generation. I think that we're looking at the total extinction of those biospheres by 2050 or so. There are some scientists who think there's some hope, and there have been some coral reefs that have recovered. But the impacts are so fast and so catastrophic, and we're so far from really changing course on carbon, it's hard for me to imagine that they endure, which means that the trips that we're now taking now to view those, we'll be taking really on the brink of mass extinctions. And it's important to keep in mind that globally, we are living already through mass extinction. The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. There have been studies that say that insect populations may have fallen by as much as 75 percent over the last few decades. Animals are dying globally at rates never before seen in planetary history, and we are living through that and imposing those costs on the planet ourselves. The ocean is a particularly vulnerable system. It's not just the coral reefs. It's also the circulation patterns. It's the fish populations. And it happens we're also polluting the oceans with enormous amounts of plastic, which are really damaging. I think those people who really love the oceans should be quite terrified... Read the full transcript at https://bigthink.com/videos/climate-change-ocean
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Why are so many objects in space shaped like discs? | Michelle Thaller Why are so many objects in space shaped like discs? | Michelle Thaller
3 weeks ago En
• Spinning discs are everywhere – just look at our solar system, the rings of Saturn, and all the spiral galaxies in the universe. • Spinning discs are the result of two things: The force of gravity and a phenomenon in physics called the conservation of angular momentum. • Gravity brings matter together; the closer the matter gets, the more it accelerates – much like an ice skater who spins faster and faster the closer their arms get to their body. Then, this spinning cloud collapses due to up and down and diagonal collisions that cancel each other out until the only motion they have in common is the spin – and voila: A flat disc. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-are-so-many-objects-in-space-shaped-like-discs Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink TRANSCRIPT MICHELLE THALLER: Rick, you have noticed one of the most wonderful and consistent patterns in the whole universe. The universe is very good at making spinning discs. Our solar system is a disc, and all the planets go around in basically the same plane, and they all go around in the same direction. Why should that be? There are discs all over the place. I mean, think about the rings of Saturn. The rings of Saturn are also very, very thin, and they all go around in the same direction. Galaxies, spiral galaxies are one big disc with everything moving around a common center. Discs seem to be something that the universe likes to make. And, in fact, that really is true. And it has to do with a number of things. It has to do with the force of gravity and something called the conservation of angular momentum. Now, gravity is very good at bringing stuff together and bringing it together so it becomes denser and denser and begins to fall into the center. Our solar system formed out of a giant cloud of dust and gas about 4 and 1/2 billion years ago. It was actually many trillions of miles across at first.. Read more at https://bigthink.com/videos/why-are-so-many-objects-in-space-shaped-like-discs
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The colossal problem with universal basic income | Douglas Rushkoff The colossal problem with universal basic income | Douglas Rushkoff
4 weeks ago En
• Universal basic income is a band-aid solution that will not solve wealth inequality, says Douglas Rushkoff. • Funneling money to the 99% perpetuates their roles as consumers, pumping money straight back up to the 1% at the top of the pyramid. • Rushkoff suggests universal basic assets instead, so that the people at the bottom of the pyramid can own some means of production and participate in the profits of mega-rich companies. Douglas Rushkoff is the host of the Team Human podcast and a professor of digital economics at CUNY/Queens. He is also the author of a dozen bestselling books on media, technology, and culture, including, Present Shock, Program or Be Programmed, Media Virus, and Team Human, the last of which is his latest work. (Buy it here: https://amzn.to/2Jy3w4C) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/the-colossal-problem-with-universal-basic-income Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink TRANSCRIPT DOUGLAS RUSHKOFF: For a long time I was a fan of universal basic income. And the logic I had was that I always hear politicians talking about, 'Let's create jobs for people. That's what we need is jobs, more jobs,' as if that's what's going to solve the economic problem. So the government is supposed to lend money to a bank, who can then lend money to a corporation, who will then build a factory in order for people to have jobs. Do we really need more jobs? In California, they're tearing down houses as we speak, because the houses are in foreclosure, and they want to keep market values high. The US Department of Agriculture burns food every week in order to keep the prices of that food high, even though there's people who are starving and people who need homes. We can't just let people have those homes. Why? Because they don't have jobs. So now we're supposed to create jobs for people to make useless stuff for other people to buy plastic crap that we're going to throw away or stick in storage units or end up in landfill just so those people can have jobs so that we can justify letting them participate in the abundance. And that's kind of ass backwards... Read more at https://bigthink.com/videos/the-colossal-problem-with-universal-basic-income
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Saying no is hard. These communication tips make it easy. | Michelle Tillis Lederman Saying no is hard. These communication tips make it easy. | Michelle Tillis Lederman
4 weeks ago En
• Give yourself permission to say "no" to things. Saying yes to everything is a fast way to burn out. • Learn to say no in a way that keeps the door of opportunity open: No should never be a one-word answer. Say "No, but I could do this instead," or, "No, but let me connect you to someone who can help." • If you really want to say yes but can't manage another commitment, try qualifiers like "yes, if," or "yes, after." Michelle Tillis Lederman, CSP, CPA, PCC, is a speaker, trainer, and author specializing in workplace communications and relationships. She was named one of Forbes Top 25 Networking Experts. Her new book is The Connector’s Advantage: 7 Mindsets to Grow Your Influence and Impact (https://amzn.to/2YgZhh4). Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-to-say-no Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink TRANSCRIPT MICHELLE TILLIS LEDERMAN: "No" doesn't feel so good. We feel a little uncomfortable. We feel bad saying no. "No" to something is "yes" to something else. And that's the first thing you need to think about to give yourself permission to say no. My husband actually put a sticky note on my computer for about a year with the word "no" on it. And it really did give me permission to say no and to remember that that's allowed. So that's the first thing. Then you want to think about how to say no and how to say yes. Because yes and no are never one-word answers. My favorite on the no side is "no, but..." "No, not right now. No, but I could do this instead. No, but this person might be interested." I look to give a no with the opportunity for a yes later. For example, somebody asked me to do a pro bono talk. Happy to do those things if they meet certain criteria. This criteria was driving two hours in rush hour to talk to 30 people. It wasn't going to meet that criteria. And I said, if you can get x number of people in the room, and we can do it during this time of day, then I'm happy to do it. So "No, but here's how you can get a yes" is a great way to enable somebody to feel OK and for you to feel OK and not want to avoid that extended relationship. So when we use a "no, but," we give them an opportunity for a "yes" down the road. But we also can use the "no, but" to help them find another way to get that help. No, but there's this great resource you may want to look into. No, but I do know somebody who's working on that. Let me ask if they might be interested in connecting. No, but. I might not be able to help you. But I'm happy to give you ideas on how you can get the help you're looking for. Sometimes you want to and get to say yes. So we want to sometimes qualify our yes: "Yes, if..." Yes, if you can get this done for me. Or yes, if you can get this many people in the room. Or yes, if. It could be "yes, after." Yes, I'd love to get on the phone with you after I'm done with this big project that I'm working on, or after I get back from vacation. Just giving yourself a little breathing room in when and the timing of when that follow through will actually happen. So we have "yes, if." We have "yes, after." We could have "yes, with." Yes, with your assistance. Or yes, with another party. I'm happy to work on that. Yes, with some training. So "yes, if," "yes, after," "yes, with," or even "yes, when." And when could be, when I feel that I'm really ready to do that. Yes, when I have gotten that training that we talked about. "Yes, when." So all of these things help give you a little bit of space and manage the expectations of the follow through of that yes.
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Tech billionaires could end climate change. So why aren’t they? | David Wallace-Wells Tech billionaires could end climate change. So why aren’t they? | David Wallace-Wells
1 month ago En
• Saving the world from the apocalyptic impact of climate change should be a dream for many Silicon Valley titans concerned about legacy, says David Wallace-Wells, and yet few are dedicating themselves to addressing the catastrophe. • Negative emissions technology funded by Bill Gates exists. It would cost $3 trillion per year to operate globally and would mean human industry could continue at current levels without global warming. • That figure sounds astronomical, however global subsidies to fossil fuel industries cost $5 trillion per year. David Wallace-Wells is the author of "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming" (https://amzn.to/2Of5N3y). He is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine. He was previously the deputy editor of The Paris Review. He lives in New York City. Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why health care should start long before you reach the hospital | Michael Dowling Why health care should start long before you reach the hospital | Michael Dowling
1 month ago En
• The average American spends about 24 hours a year at the doctor's office. • What you do the other 364 days a year mostly determines your health. • Michael Dowling discusses Northwell's focus on environmental, social, economic and other social determinants of health. Michael J. Dowling is President and Chief Executive Officer of Northwell Health, New York’s largest health care provider and private employer, with 23 hospitals, more than 700 outpatient locations, $12 billion in annual revenue and 68,000+ employees. One of health care’s most-influential executives, Mr. Dowling has received numerous awards, including the Ellis Island Medal of Honor, an honorary degree from the prestigious Queen’s University Belfast and his selection as the Grand Marshal of the 2017 St. Patrick’s Day Parade in NYC. He also serves as chair of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Michael Dowling is the coauthor of "Health Care Reboot: Megatrends Energizing American Medicine" with Charles Kenney: https://amzn.to/2uf1Sua Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink TRANSCRIPT Michael Dowling: If you want to improve health, you have to deal with more than just the provision of medical care. So a lot of what medical care gets blamed for or what we call the health system, the hospitals, the docs what we get blamed for are things that we don't have direct responsibility for. In the U.S. we have very, very high mortality, higher than other parts of the world there are lots of reasons for this. For example, death from gunshot wounds is included in the mortality stats. Yet, people who work in health care are not the people who actually kill people with guns. Sometimes, these statistics get all warped. That doesn't mean we shouldn't be involved. That doesn't mean we shouldn't be a catalyst, that we shouldn't be an influencer, that we shouldn't actually be out there in the communities doing things. Now if you get sick and you come to a hospital, yeah, we can take care of you. But the issues that determine your health go way, way beyond just the provision of medical care. It has to do with lifestyle. It has to do with social circumstance. It has to do with environment, your family situation, where you live. If you're living in a very, very good neighborhood there's a lot of research done on this with all of the facilities that you would have in any top, middle-class, upper-middle-class neighborhood, you will live years longer than the person who lives in a very, very poor area, in general. So if I want to improve your health, I've got to make sure that I have doctors, and nurses, et cetera to provide medical care to you. But I've also got to figure out how to work on all of these other things. How do I, for example, make sure that there is not lead in the house that you live in or in the apartment building. We had kids living in homes and it still goes on in many of the buildings in New York City and elsewhere where the radiators in the homes were painted with lead paint or lead pipes. Now I can have the doctor go to that apartment every month and treat that kid. But unless I change the paint, or change the pipe, or get rid of the radiator, or cover up the radiator, having a doctor go there every month doesn't necessarily overall improve health. So I know somebody in the last two days that was at the hospital, had an occurrence in one of our hospitals, goes home. Our hospital sent a nutritionist to the home. That nutritionist sat down with that person for a couple of hours, explained to them how they should be eating. That person, there was a weight issue not substantial but there was a weight issue, there was a high blood pressure issue so they explained diet. They then offered to come to the home and teach the person how to cook those foods that would be more appropriate to improve health. That's how we improve health. The hospital did its thing. But if you don't follow up and do those other things, that person will be back in the hospital again.
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Are you an overbuyer or an underbuyer? | Gretchen Rubin Are you an overbuyer or an underbuyer? | Gretchen Rubin
1 month ago En
One way to limit clutter is by being mindful of your spending. - Overbuyers are people who love to buy — they stockpile things as a result. These are individuals who are prone to run out of space in trying to store their stuff and they may even lose track of what — and how much of what — they have. - One way overbuyers can limit their waste, both money and space wise, is by storing items at the store, and then buy them when they really need them. - Underbuyers tend to go to extraordinary lengths to not buy things. They save money and do fewer errands, however, they often make do with shabby personal items. They may also, when they finally decide to go out to buy a product, go without entirely because the item may no longer be available. Gretchen Rubin is the author of many books, including the block-buster New York Times bestsellers The Four Tendencies, Better Than Before, and The Happiness Project. She also has a top-ranked, award-winning podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin, and a popular blog, gretchenrubin.com. She lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters. Rubin's latest book is "Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness" (https://goo.gl/QBXWck) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/are-you-an-overbuyer-or-an-underbuyer Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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ASA’s zero-gravity plane: How astronauts train for microgravity | Michelle Thaller ASA’s zero-gravity plane: How astronauts train for microgravity | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
A lot goes into being weightless. - There is no way to shield astronauts on earth from the effects of gravity. - Astronauts train for space by going on an airplane that flies high at an arc so that the force lifts them in the air. However, we can only achieve about a minute's worth of weightlessness this way. - NASA researchers have nicknamed this plane the "Vomit Comet." Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/nasas-zero-gravity-plane-how-astronauts-train-for-microgravity Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why Russia and China are besties | Parag Khanna Why Russia and China are besties | Parag Khanna
1 month ago En
The Kremlin has been eying China for a very long time. - Russia is not a European power, nor does it strive to be, says Parag Khanna. It is a Eurasian power. - Western sanctions on Russia, coupled with Asian's economic rise, has inspired Russia to pivot toward China – its largest trading partner. - The West would understand Russia better if it fully considered Russia's economic reorientation toward Asia, and especially China. Dr. Parag Khanna is Managing Partner of FutureMap. His books include "The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century" (https://goo.gl/tN3sbp). He is also author of "The Second World" (2008), "How to Run the World" (2011), and "Connectography" (2016). He is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-russia-and-china-are-besties Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Data spies: The dark and shady practices of Silicon Valley | Roger McNamee Data spies: The dark and shady practices of Silicon Valley | Roger McNamee
1 month ago En
This is how data harvesting really works. You're not going to like it. - In this absorbing talk spanning the last 20 years of tech, Roger McNamee starts at the origins of the PayPal Mafia (which included entrepreneurs like Elon Musk, Peter Thiel, and Reid Hoffman) and traces them to Silicon Valley's global domination. - Data is used by online vendors in all industries to make behavioral predictions for profit – often in unethical or cloaked ways. - Did we sign up for this? Roger McNamee calls for a halt to blind participation and asks for a national debate on whether commerce based on personal data (but not for personal benefit) should be legal. Roger McNamee has been a Silicon Valley investor for 35 years. He co-founded successful funds in venture, crossover and private equity. His most recent fund, Elevation, included U2's Bono as a co-founder. He holds a B.A. from Yale University and an M.B.A. from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is the author Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe (https://goo.gl/re2n9H) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/data-spies-the-dark-and-shady-practices-of-silicon-valley-2631681372 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Earth at 2° hotter will be horrific. Now here’s what 4° will look like. | David Wallace-Wells Earth at 2° hotter will be horrific. Now here’s what 4° will look like. | David Wallace-Wells
1 month ago En
This is what the world will be like if we do not act on climate change. - The best-case scenario of climate change is that world gets just 2°C hotter, which scientists call the "threshold of catastrophe". - Why is that the good news? Because if humans don't change course now, the planet is on a trajectory to reach 4°C at the end of this century, which would bring $600 trillion in global climate damages, double the warfare, and a refugee crisis 100x worse than the Syrian exodus. - David Wallace-Wells explains what would happen at an 8°C and even 13°C increase. These predictions are horrifying, but should not scare us into complacency. "It should make us focus on them more intently," he says. David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine. He was previously the deputy editor of The Paris Review. He lives in New York City. His latest book is The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming (https://goo.gl/ih35YX) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/earth-at-2deg-hotter-will-be-horrific-now-heres-what-4deg-will-look-like Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The unexpected cost of living for a very long time | Michael Dowling The unexpected cost of living for a very long time | Michael Dowling
1 month ago En
- Medical advances have increased our longevity by decades, says Michael Dowling, president and CEO of Northwell Health. That benefit comes with an unintended disadvantage – high costs. - Bringing the overall cost of health care down is near impossible, as an increased life expectancy brings new diseases and procedures with it. - Reducing the out-of-pocket cost is a separate issue, however. It is possible and necessary to lower costs so they don't become a barrier to people seeking care. Michael J. Dowling is President and Chief Executive Officer of Northwell Health, New York’s largest health care provider and private employer, with 23 hospitals, more than 700 outpatient locations, $12 billion in annual revenue and 68,000+ employees. One of health care’s most-influential executives, Mr. Dowling has received numerous awards, including the Ellis Island Medal of Honor, an honorary degree from the prestigious Queen’s University Belfast and his selection as the Grand Marshal of the 2017 St. Patrick’s Day Parade in NYC. He also serves as chair of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Dowling is the co-author of Health Care Reboot: Megatrends Energizing American Medicine (https://goo.gl/V2SyPe) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Sponsored-by-Northwell-Health/the-unexpected-cost-of-living-for-a-very-long-time Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink If you look at where we are today vis-a-vis where we were 40 years ago in health care overall, it's a phenomenal success story. We've added 35 years to life in the last 100 years, a combination of public health and medical advancement. But because we have done so well in keeping you alive a long time, we've increased the cost. Cardiac care in the 1970s was cheap. Because there was nothing we could do for you. Today it's expensive, because we can do a lot. And the new advances coming out every day will allow us to do more. If you had a bad hip in the 1970s, what was the answer? Suck it up. You want to play golf? Eh, play a little less golf. Today, we can do a hip replacement in 38 minutes. Because we're able to keep people alive longer, they live into their '80s and '90s. The bulk of health care expenditures are spent on older people at the end of life the last year to year and a half of life. And also, because we can keep you alive longer, we have now new diseases that are occurring that we didn't have before like Alzheimer's. You can't be talking about all of those great things and at the same time talk about, 'Well, you know, we spent 6% of our GDP in the 1960s on health care. Why are we spending 17% today?'. Because we can do a heck of a lot more today. That does not mean that we don't have efficiencies that we can need to work on, or that we are not inefficient in certain areas, or that we don't overspend in certain areas. But I'm a big believer that the overall cost of health care will never come down. The best you will be able to is slow the rate of growth. That's different from what we should be doing to make sure that people's out-of-pocket expenses don't become a barrier to getting care. We've got two different issues. People confuse them all the time. People say, I have to pay more out of my pocket, therefore, health care is costly. Yeah, but you're not going to fix the overall cost. You've got to fix this issue. The cost growth can be reduced. But coming from 17% of GNP to 10% of GNP? That'll never happen.
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Andrew Yang: How financial insecurity sinks American IQ scores Andrew Yang: How financial insecurity sinks American IQ scores
1 month ago En
- Andrew Yang is running for president in 2020 as a Democrat (https://www.yang2020.com). - Not being able to pay your bills has the functional equivalent of lowering your IQ by 13 points. Many Americans have scarcity mindsets because of their inability to pay their bills. - In a scarcity mindset, your functional bandwidth decreases — it influences you to be less generous and less reasonable. - The opposite of a mindset of scarcity is a mindset of abundance, which is what many entrepreneurs have. Abundance mindsets tend to build on to themselves if the environment is right. Yang's latest book is The War on Normal People: The Truth About America's Disappearing Jobs and Why Universal Basic Income Is Our Future (https://goo.gl/rgv3bz) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-financial-insecurity-sinks-american-iq-scores Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Is time real or is it an illusion? | Michelle Thaller Is time real or is it an illusion? | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
- Time can change depending on how fast you're moving through space. Also, time can "flow" at different rates for different observers. - Light doesn't experience time — it exists outside of time. - We perceive space and time differently, but they may be woven together. For instance, they both balance each other out: If you are still, time goes by at a natural rate. However, if you move through space very fast, time begins to slow down. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/is-time-real-or-is-it-an-illusion Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The U-curve of happiness: Why old age is a time of psychological bliss | Ashton Applewhite The U-curve of happiness: Why old age is a time of psychological bliss | Ashton Applewhite
1 month ago En
Here's why many 80 year olds are probably happier than you. - The U-curve of happiness shows that we humans are most content at the beginnings and ends of our lives. - The famous midlife crisis is the trough of our happiness because it's a time when we have responsibility for people older and younger than us, and we grow aware that we may not fulfill the dreams of our youth. - Children and people in their 80s are uniquely able to live in the moment and be happy because they live at a neurological and psychological sweet spot, respectively. Ashton Applewhite is a Brooklyn-based activist and writer. Her latest book, This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism, debunks many myths about late life (https://goo.gl/Ln6idn) Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: https://bigthink.com/videos/the-u-curve-of-happiness-why-old-age-is-a-time-of-psychological-bliss YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Turning coal miners into coders is not the answer to automation | Andrew Yang Turning coal miners into coders is not the answer to automation | Andrew Yang
1 month ago En
- Andrew Yang is running for president in 2020 as a Democrat (https://www.yang2020.com). In this video, he discusses the greatest challenge of our time: automation and human-centered capitalism. - Currently, a person's value is linked to the economic value of their job. So the soon-to-be-extinct coal miner should find new purpose by becoming a software coder, right? - That's shortsighted, says Yang. One day soon, even the best coders will be outpaced by AI. We need to prepare for the inevitable future by shifting how we fundamentally think about human value. Yang's latest book is The War on Normal People: The Truth About America's Disappearing Jobs and Why Universal Basic Income Is Our Future Read more at BigThink.com: https://goo.gl/rgv3bz Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The evolution of mathematics, from agriculture to quantum mechanics | Michelle Thaller The evolution of mathematics, from agriculture to quantum mechanics | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
Why is math the universal language? NASA's Michelle Thaller solves that one. - Mathematics has snowballed from counting to 10 on our fingers, to calculus, to abstract concepts like imaginary numbers that move in 11 dimensions and predict particles physics. - The math that led us down the rabbit hole of quantum mechanics is bizarre and while we can crunch the numbers, we can't really understand what they mean. - If the math confirms that particles can move in 11 dimensions, is that a fundamental truth of the universe? Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/mathematics-universal-language Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Master the art of networking, from entrance to exit | Michelle Tillis Lederman Master the art of networking, from entrance to exit | Michelle Tillis Lederman
1 month ago En
4 steps to go from nervous wreck to networking master. - This crash course in communication will help you turn an opportunity into a real outcome. - There are 4 progressive stages to networking: Ask curious questions, listen and probe (or share), connect and find similarities, and the close. - The exit is one of the most important stages; a good close means managing the mood memory – leave the person with a positive mood connected to your conversation, even if they don't remember exactly what you said. Michelle Tillis Lederman, CSP, CPA, PCC, is a speaker, trainer, and author specializing in workplace communications and relationships. She was named one of Forbes Top 25 Networking Experts. Her new book is The Connector’s Advantage: 7 Mindsets to Grow Your Influence and Impact (https://goo.gl/ZGoSrG) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-to-network-better Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I always say start by being curious. I think about it in four steps. And step one is ask – ask a question you actually want to know the answer to, and one that you might be willing to share a little information on as well. You want to ask an open-ended question to get somebody talking. And when you're thinking about, 'Well what do I ask a question about?' well, you could think about the environment you're in, you could think about the event you're at, you could think about the geographic region: "Hey know any good restaurant in the area?" You could think about what's in the news right now. And you never know where they might lead – and that's where part two comes in. Part two is listen and probe or listen and share. So listen and probe – obviously the key is 'listen' because when you're asking a question you need to not think about what you need to say next, you need to think about what are they saying and where could that conversation take us. If they've said something that you're curious about keep going – probe a little further. Be careful not to interrogate; it's not machine-gun questions at somebody, but it's a probing question to learn a little bit more. And then interject with listen and share, so you can create those 'you too, me too' moments of sharing your perspective or your experience or your ideas on whatever that topic might be. Three is to look and connect. In connect, we're looking for those similarities, those commonalities. What makes us say, "I want to continue this relationship." What is the 'you too, me too' moment because people like people like them. And they like people who they have associations with. So do we have commons interests? Do we have common values? Do we have common experiences? Do we have common goals? Do we have common needs? And really look for surprise commonalities. They're not always there and obvious on the surface. I always say call out the similarities not the differences. When you're in stage three, this is when you're thinking about what's our next point of contact? What did we talk about that I might be able to follow up with? Did they need a plumber for that weather happening? Did they need information about a place they're going on vacation and I might have a travel agent or a hotel recommendation? What was it that you talked about that can lead to that next point of contact? And if there wasn't something specific well, we always have just connecting virtually. LinkIn to them or connect to them on whatever other social platform they are on. And once we have that next point of contact we're ready for step four of the conversation, which is actually the close. When you close the conversation down be sure to manage the mood memory. Mood memory is how somebody feels; they don't remember what you said, but they remember how they felt in the conversation with you. And you want to make sure that you don't ruin that mood memory right at the end when you're looking at your watch or over the shoulder trying to think about 'How do I get out of this?'.
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6 ways to let go of pointless possessions | Gretchen Rubin 6 ways to let go of pointless possessions | Gretchen Rubin
1 month ago En
It's almost time for spring cleaning. The "ex-factor test" is imagining wearing an outfit and determining whether you'd feel good in it if you saw your ex on the street. Another tip is to place stray accessories in a box and determine whether they are handy in your everyday life. If not, especially after a long period of time, get rid of the items. If there's something you can do in less than a minute that will make your life easier in the long run, do it immediately. "You're getting rid of the scum on the surface of life," says Rubin about doing so. Gretchen Rubin is the author of many books, including the block-buster New York Times bestsellers The Four Tendencies, Better Than Before, and The Happiness Project. She also has a top-ranked, award-winning podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin, and a popular blog, gretchenrubin.com. She lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters. Rubin's latest book is "Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness" (https://goo.gl/QBXWck) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-to-let-go-of-pointless-possessions-in-6-easy-steps Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The biggest A.I. risks: Superintelligence and the elite silos | Ben Goertzel The biggest A.I. risks: Superintelligence and the elite silos | Ben Goertzel
1 month ago En
When it comes to raising superintelligent A.I., kindness may be our best bet. - We have no guarantee that a superintelligent A.I. is going to do what we want. Once we create something many times more intelligent than we are, it may be "insane" to think we can control what it does. -What's the best bet to ensure superintelligent A.I. remains compliant with humans and does good works, such as advance medicine? To raise it in a way that's imbued with compassion and understanding, says Goertzel. - One way to limit "people doing bad things out of frustration," it may be advantageous for the entire world to be plugged into the A.I. economy so that developers, from whatever country, can monetize their codes. Ben Goertzel is CEO and chief scientist at SingularityNET, a project dedicated to creating benevolent decentralized artificial general intelligence. He is also chief scientist of financial prediction firm Aidyia Holdings and robotics firm Hanson Robotics; Chairman of AI software company Novamente LLC; Chairman of the Artificial General Intelligence Society and the OpenCog Foundation.His latest book is AGI Revolution: An Inside View of the Rise of Artificial General Intelligence. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/ai-superintelligence Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Technology is revolutionizing health care – for better and for worse Technology is revolutionizing health care – for better and for worse
1 month ago En
The future of health care is high tech. That's good news – mostly. - Health care is at the forefront of technology and innovation. Telehealth, bioelectronic medicine, and big data improve the quality of patient care while reducing the cost. - As wearable devices and implants offering real-time health data to everyday people become staples of modern life, people will discover conditions that were previously undetectable. They will also perceive illnesses that aren't there. - This supposedly cost-cutting technology may become an enormous burden to health care providers. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Sponsored-by-Northwell-Health/future-health-care Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Cryptocurrency’s role in the future of money | Elad Gil Cryptocurrency’s role in the future of money | Elad Gil
1 month ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink So, from an end-user perspective there’s a lot of questions around the impact of either Bitcoin or blockchains. And if you look at the very best technologies they tend to sort of eventually fade seamlessly into the background. So for example, you’re using your phone every day, but you don’t necessarily understand how TCPIP is working in terms of transmitting data on the Internet. And there’s lots of examples like that where the best technology sort of fades into the background in terms of what you’re doing. In the case of Bitcoin or related cryptocurrencies a lot of the near-term impact of that is really around financial services and the emergence of a new digital asset class. And so if you look at Bitcoin really what it is is in some sense a store of value or a store of wealth, and many people compare it to something like millennial gold. It’s basically a digital asset that you hold as an investable product. And so I think many of the early uses is just going to be this will end up being a part of everybody’s portfolio in ten years, and you’re going to have some proportion in bonds and some proportion in stocks, and then some proportion in cryptocurrencies. So I think for most people that’s really how it’s going to exist in the shorter-term. Some people are talking about the Web3 or Internet3 and how all infrastructure is going to flip over to decentralized cryptocurrency-based systems. I’m much more skeptical about that, at least in the short run. In part because centralized systems tend to be dramatically more efficient than decentralized systems; in other words if you look at the cost of running a centralized system it’s much lower, you have bargaining power around the underlying hardware, you have economies of scale in terms of how you deploy it and where you place it, and also just running these systems is much simpler if you have a centralized approach. What that means it is is that most of the times that you’re going to see blockchains pop up is when you’re using something that is uniquely associated with them. And if you ask what a blockchain is it’s really sort of a bad database, but it has very unique characteristics where it has this notion of being trust-less, in other words you can, in aggregate, come to consensus or decisions together or conclusions around the quality of data, the quality of the transaction or other things in a way that no central authority can control. And what that means is you’ve created systems that are effectively censorship proof or seizure resistant, in other words the government can’t come and take your asset if you’re in a country which has very bad governance, or it means that no third-party can suddenly accidentally erase your data, or you can’t hack a third-party to access your data (although obviously you can still hack a blockchain). And so really where that tends to crop up, if you ask “what are the things that I don’t want the government or other third-party to take from me?” or a place where I want some notion of privacy around what I’m doing, it really tends to be around money or it tends to be around personal data. And in the long run I think those are the areas that are going to be most impacted, but I think in the short run really it’s going to be about “Do you have a piece of this digital asset in your portfolio?”
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What if you were immune to chronic pain? Vaccines could make it happen. | Lou Reese What if you were immune to chronic pain? Vaccines could make it happen. | Lou Reese
1 month ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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You have doppelgängers. They’re quietly influencing your life. | Seth Stephens-Davidowitz You have doppelgängers. They’re quietly influencing your life. | Seth Stephens-Davidowitz
1 month ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Blood diamonds, stolen cars, sweatshops: Blockchain stops all that | Brian Behlendorf Blood diamonds, stolen cars, sweatshops: Blockchain stops all that | Brian Behlendorf
1 month ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why the school-college-job pathway is about to go extinct | Jamie Merisotis Why the school-college-job pathway is about to go extinct | Jamie Merisotis
1 month ago En
The automation age will render the traditional concept of "jobs" obsolete. Human work is about to undergo an historic shift. Is the education system ready? - Lumina Foundation is partnering with Big Think to unearth the next large-scale, rapid innovation in post-high school education. - If you have an idea that could empower learning beyond high school, enter the Lumina Prize. You could win flights and accommodation for two nights in New York City, media training from Big Think's producers and social venture advisors, and the opportunity to film a Big Think video that will be seen by a network of potential investors and an audience of 5.5 million people. - Enter the Lumina Prize here: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/why-the-school-college-job-pathway-is-about-to-go-extinct Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Jamie Merisotis is a globally recognized leader in philanthropy, education, and public policy. Since 2008, he has served as president and CEO of Lumina Foundation, an independent, private foundation that is committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all. Merisotis is the author of the widely-acclaimed book America Needs Talent, named a Top 10 Business Book of 2016 by Booklist. His writing has appeared in The Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Washington Monthly, Politico, and other publications.
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