Big Think
Big Think is the leading source of expert-driven, actionable, educational content -- with thousands of videos, featuring experts ranging from Bill Clinton to Bill Nye, we help you get smarter, faster. We aim to help you explore the big ideas and core skills that define knowledge in the 21st century, so you can apply them to the questions and challenges in your own life.

1535 videos
How health care quietly powers the U.S. economy | Michael Dowling How health care quietly powers the U.S. economy | Michael Dowling
1 day ago En
What have hospitals done for us lately? Actually, quite a lot. There is enormous job growth happening in the health care sector. It added 346,000 new jobs in 2018, outpacing every other sector. Hospitals economically sustain large communities not only through medical care but through ancillary industries such as construction, laundry, maintenance and food service jobs. Hospitals are a silent but mighty economic engine. Closing down hospitals rather than revitalizing where possible can deprive struggling communities even further. Michael J. Dowling is President and Chief Executive Officer of Northwell Health, New York’s largest health care provider and private employer, with 23 hospitals, more than 665 outpatient locations, $11 billion in annual revenue and 66,000+ employees. One of health care’s most-influential executives, Mr. Dowling has received numerous awards, including the Ellis Island Medal of Honor, an honorary degree from the prestigious Queen’s University Belfast and his selection as the Grand Marshal of the 2017 St. Patrick’s Day Parade in NYC. He also serves as chair of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Dowling is the author of "Health Care Reboot: Megatrends Energizing American Medicine" (https://goo.gl/V2SyPe) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Sponsored-by-Northwell-Health/health-care-powers-the-economy Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Health care is a humongous economic engine. It's often forgotten about the fact that there is a real contribution to the economy by health care. If you're running a large health care organization, you're probably the place that is doing the most construction in the region. So for example, in our organization, we do more construction than anybody else. If you want to be in the health care business and you want to be in the laundry business, we have the largest laundry service. If you want to be in maintenance, we have probably one of the largest maintenance shops in the region. The dietary business – just imagine the amount of meals that are provided in a hospital every day; more meals than are provided in any restaurant than you can think about here in Manhattan, every single day, seven days a week. So if you want to be in the dietary business, in the food business, health care is a job growth area. The point I'm trying to make is it is not just a business that only takes care of the medical treatment of a person who comes in who is ill. It's all of the other ancillary business. So whatever occupation that you want to be in, you can find it inside health care. If you're in a poor community and you have a hospital – and some people would say, maybe that hospital in that community is not doing that well, but also, remember, that it is the largest employment source in that community. And that's why you often get into a discussion about, well, maybe that hospital should be downsized. Maybe that hospital should be closed. And there are reasons to argue those points in certain circumstances, but you also have to face with the reality that, in those cases, that place is the only place that hires people from that community. So if that facility closes, there are no jobs in that community. Therefore, that community, which is deprived at the moment, will only be more deprived if the hospital closes. So it's just not only health care alone that you're looking at. It's all of the surrounding issues that are connected to the direct provision of health care services.
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Billionaire warlords: Why the future is medieval | Sean McFate Billionaire warlords: Why the future is medieval | Sean McFate
5 days ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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I reported the news in print and online. Here’s the difference. | Jill Abramson I reported the news in print and online. Here’s the difference. | Jill Abramson
6 days ago En
Former NYTimes executive editor Jill Abramson dissects the big problem with internet news. - Jill Abramson, former executive editor of The New York Times, describes what life was like for a journalist in the 1980s – a "stone age" when news was governed by the printing press schedule. - Today, many journalists will break stories on Twitter before writing it, eliminating nuance and increasing the chance of error. - Social media in particular has added a fatal speed to journalism. Errors erode public trust in the media, and allow those in power to undermine the free press. Jill Abramson is journalist who who has served in the most senior editorial positions at The New York Times, where she was the first woman to serve as Washington Bureau Chief, Managing Editor and Executive Editor. She is also an English lecturer at Harvard University and an author. Her latest book is "Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts" (https://goo.gl/weRUii) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/i-reported-the-news-in-print-and-online-heres-the-difference Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Weird love advice that works: Be a dog. | Gretchen Rubin Weird love advice that works: Be a dog. | Gretchen Rubin
1 week ago En
It feels crazy good when someone is excited to see you. Give that gift to your family every day – but especially on Valentine's day. - The research is sad but true: People are often more considerate to friends and strangers than they are to their partners. - Gretchen Rubin's advice? When your partner walks in the door, show them as much affection as your dog does. Be excited to see them! Give a real hello and a real goodbye. - Appreciate your partner: It's the easiest thing to do, and the easiest thing to forget. Rubin's latest book is available March 5th: Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness (https://goo.gl/qpCJZk) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/relationship-hacks-happiness Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink When you think about romance and sweethearts and spouses, one of the most striking observations from the research – it's sad, but it's true – is that, often, married couples will treat each other with less consideration than they show to their friends, or even to strangers. And when I read this, I thought, oh my gosh, can that be true? And I realized, of course it's true, because the people that we're married to are so familiar to us, they are so close to us; they are really part of our lives, and it's very easy to take them for granted or to make them the brunt of a bad mood or a short temper, and to forget to use our consideration, our good manners, our gentle language. And so one of the things that I remind myself of all the time is that I want to show as much consideration to my husband as I would to any passing stranger or friend. And I also try to remind myself to show my husband as much or more affection as my dog, because when my husband comes and goes from the apartment, I want to give him a real hello and a real goodbye. I want to give him a kiss and a hug and really look him in the eye and say that I'm glad to see him. If my dog can do it, I can do it.
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The science of expansion: Andromeda, gravity, and the ‘Big Rip’ | Michelle Thaller The science of expansion: Andromeda, gravity, and the ‘Big Rip’ | Michelle Thaller
1 week ago En
If the universe is expanding in all directions, why is Andromeda hurtling toward the Milky Way? - The Andromeda Galaxy and our Milky Way are on a collision course that will obliterate life on Earth 4.5 billion years from now. - The universe is expanding in all directions, all at once – so why are Andromeda and the Milky Way drawing nearer? The gravity between them is a stronger force than expansion. - The rate of expansion is accelerating. If it continues to speed up, its force may become strong enough pull things apart that are currently held together by superior forces: Our galaxy, the solar system, and even the atoms in our bodies. That possible ending to the universe is known as the 'Big Rip'. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA.gov Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/the-science-of-expansion-andromeda-gravity-and-the-big-rip Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink One of the questions I get asked most commonly as an astronomer is if almost all the galaxies in the universe are flying away from us in space, why is the Andromeda Galaxy getting closer to us? Does that somehow mean that the Big Bang works differently in different parts of the universe? And the answer simply is: no. Space is expanding because of the Big Bang. All of space is expanding in every direction all at once and from our viewpoint that means that it looks like all the other galaxies are moving away from us. But not all the universe around us appears to be expanding. For example, the Earth doesn't seem to be getting any farther away from the Sun. The Sun is not getting any farther away from our galaxy. Thank about smaller scales, like your body; your body (luckily) is not expanding along with the universe. And the reason is that the expansion of the universe is actually a pretty gentle force; you really only notice it out in the middle of nowhere in the vast reaches of space between the galaxies. There's a lot of space out of there, so there is a lot of space to expand and so you really notice this expansion. But there are things that are stronger than the expansion force. For example, my body is held together by chemical forces and by electrical forces. That is much, much stronger than the tiny little push that space has to expand inside me. I hold together very well. One of the analogies I think about is: You could try to push over the Empire State Building by blowing on it. You are actually exerting a force on the Empire State Building by blowing on it, you can measure that force, but you're not going to blow over the Empire State Building. There are things that are much stronger than this omnipresent but gentle force of the expansion of the universe. The gravity between the Sun and the Earth is stronger than space's pressure to expand over that scale. The force of gravity is stronger than the outward push of the expansion of the universe. That's also true of the galaxy, we are held in orbit around the center of the galaxy. Gravitationally, that's much stronger than any expansion force...
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Jillian Michaels: How antibiotics used in factory farming destroy our microbiomes Jillian Michaels: How antibiotics used in factory farming destroy our microbiomes
1 week ago En
Good bacteria are our friends. We need to protect them. - More and more research nowadays links good gut flora to several health benefits, such as the inhibition of Alzheimer's to a fast metabolism. - Since we're over prescribed antibiotics, and because much of the meat we consume comes from animals that were fed antibiotics, we are destroying much of the good bacteria, and often at the risk — because of our diets — of replenishing them. - A well-rounded diet that's light in animal protein, high in macronutrients, and supplemented with a good intake of prebiotics can ensure we're keeping probiotics flourishing. Jillian Michaels has been a fitness expert and wellness coach for over 20 years. In addition, she owned and operated a sports medicine facility, where she worked as a physical therapy aide under the physiatrists, physical therapists, and chiropractors. Jillian's passion for fitness training originates from 17 years of martial arts practice in Muay Thai and Akarui-Do, in which she holds a black belt. Since 1993, Jillian has held two personal training certificates from the leading certification programs in the country: the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. In addition she is Kettlebell Concepts certified. Jillian has also developed a continuing education series for trainers with AFAA and holds a nutrition and wellness consultant certificate with the American Fitness Professionals and Associates. Books, DVDs, and video games — Jillian has them all covered. She is a New York Times bestselling author of numerous books including Master Your Metabolism, Unlimited: How to Build an Exceptional Life, and her most recent bestselling release, Slim for Life: My Insider Secrets To Simple, Fast, And Lasting Weight Loss. Her first comprehensive 90-day weight loss system, Jillian Michaels Body Revolution is available in retail stores across North America, and JILLIAN MICHAELS BODYSHRED, an intense group fitness class based on Jillian's highly-effective 3-2-1 interval system, is currently taught in Crunch gyms and the YMCA in the US, exclusively at GoodLife Fitness in Canada, and is and expanding further worldwide this year. Michaels' latest book is "The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty" (https://goo.gl/D69uL4) Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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My childhood was deadly. Education saved me. | Agnes Igoye My childhood was deadly. Education saved me. | Agnes Igoye
1 week ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Young women and girls in my country, if I flashback, you know—how I grew up is really tough. The environment in which you are born, you know, the parents you have is very important. That’s why for me I am very keen and really advocate for education. Because what saved me is like, you know, my parents they had little education but they had something. I remember—the day of my birth—because it’s a long story, I remember my father and mother telling me how my father had to ride the bicycle and my mother had to put a lamp so that they can see the path because at the time I was born in a hospital. They had to cross a forest, you know, which had a lion. That lion had eaten animals so it was a real danger. And my mother—you’re a woman and you’re pregnant and you are seated on a bicycle. So eventually they made it to hospital and the first person to come was my aunt, my father’s sister. And her mission was to come and see the sex of the baby. And when she opened and saw that I was a girl, she just made an exclamation, and in my language it’s like [speaking foreign language], meaning “This is yet another girl.” So for her that was really a disappointment and she sent the message to the village that my mother had given birth to another girl. So girls are regarded as useless. It’s the boys who carry the traditions. It’s the boys who carry the family name. And being born in that environment and living through that and like I said, you know, and you are being called a prostitute even as you’re playing. And then I asked my mother, “What does this word mean? Because the men and the boys keep calling me this word, And yet I have my real name.” That’s when she told me what that meant, and I made her a promise. I said “Mommy, I’m going to really work so hard in life and embarrass these men by success in life.” So that was a driving force for me and lucky for me they allowed the girls to have an education. We walked long distances, we went to school, you know, it was five kilometers. I don’t know how much that is in miles. And you are teased, because that’s not your space, where you’re going to school with the boys. But, you know, you just go through that. And then along the way that’s when the Lord’s Resistance Army also disrupted our lives in the village, and they were targeting, again, the girl-child. They didn’t want married women. They wanted virgins. They wanted girls to take for sexual exploitations. So again with my sisters we had to flee the village. I remember running through those bushes and forests and ending up in an internally-displaced people’s camp. So it’s tough, you know, being a girl. The sexual exploitation, and if I didn’t have the parents I have because when my father making that decision from that camp to move us far away to the city, having lost everything, he had his girls in his mind. And to really drum it into us that we are not useless, we can amount to something, really motivated me to get an education. So it’s tough. I know it can improve because I’ve seen it improving. The more you educate your people, the more you educate a girl, the more she stays longer in school, the more you educate parents, the more they’ll be mindful about education, and so many other things.
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Would Jesus have wanted Christianity? | Rob Bell Would Jesus have wanted Christianity? | Rob Bell
1 week ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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“It’s all going down.” Why journalism is up in flames. | Tina Brown “It’s all going down.” Why journalism is up in flames. | Tina Brown
1 week ago En
News doesn't sell. That's lethal to journalism – and democracy. - Apart from media giants like The New York Times and The Washington Post, nearly every news outlet is laying off journalists or collapsing completely. - The reason? No advertiser wants to put their ad next to serious, hard-edged news. Sensational content is favored by algorithms, and that isn't just annoying. It has terrifying consequences. - Journalists are the watchdogs of democracy. The more local news outlets and independent media disappear, the more those in power can do as they wish. Unreported scandals will fester and damage citizens. Corruption will go unchecked. Tina Brown is an award-winning journalist, editor, author and founder of the Women in the World summits. Between 1979 and 2017, she was editor-in-chief of Tatler, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and authored The Diana Chronicles and The Vanity Fair Diaries. (https://goo.gl/6RBBMC) Her podcast “TBD with Tina Brown” is available on Apple podcast. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/its-all-going-down-why-journalism-is-up-in-flames Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How to use a thesaurus to actually improve your writing | Martin Amis How to use a thesaurus to actually improve your writing | Martin Amis
1 week ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Famously Nabokov said—or infamously, perhaps it’s now a synonym for that too – said, “There is only one school of writing, that of talent.” And it’s axiomatic that you can’t teach talent. Of course you can’t. But what you can do is instill certain principles, and the avoidance of ugly repetition is very important. Repetition has its uses and anything is better than trying to avoid repetition through what they call “elegant variation.” This is an example from a biography of Lincoln: “While in Chicago he appeared to back concessions to the South. In New York he seemed to support…” You know, there’s no point in using a different word when there’s no change in meaning. And that’s just something that the writer was taught when they were 12— never to use a word twice in a sentence. And they’ve become terrorized by that and then addicted to a new “ingenuity” where you avoid it. But I’m talking more about sounds and rhythms. The Nabokov novel we know of as Invitation to a Beheading was originally called – not for very long – Invitation to an Execution. Now Nabokov said, “Of course I avoided the repetition of the suffix so chose to call it Invitation to a Beheading rather than Invitation to an Execution, which is sort of rhythmically ugly.” You’ve got to think about the bits of the word as well as the word in its totality. Avoiding repetition of prefixes and suffixes as well as rhymes and half-rhymes, intentional alliteration, et cetera, can be achieved by anyone simply by using a dictionary and a thesaurus. People think thesauruses are there so you can look up a fancy word for “big” or a fancy word for “long”. That’s not what a thesaurus is for, in my view. A thesaurus is – you come to a point in a sentence and it’s usually towards the end of a sentence where you’re unhappy with the word you’ve chosen not because of its meaning but because of its rhythm. And you may want a monosyllable for this concept or you may want a trisyllable. So you look in the thesaurus, you find a simile that has the right number, you know, for the whole sentence to maintain its rhythmical integrity. And you just do that by going to your thesaurus. And also going to your dictionary. Do not use words against the derivation. For example, dilapidate. It’s fine to talk about a dilapidated building but not fine to talk about a dilapidated hedge, because dilapidated comes from “lapis,” which means “stone.” So a really careful writer will make sure that they’re not doing— not visiting an indecorum on the word’s derivation. So it’s very labor intensive. I mean it takes a long time to sometimes—to get your sentence right, rhythmically, and to clear the main words in it from misuse. And all you’re winning is the respect of other serious writers. But I think that any amount of effort is worth it for that. And it’s easy enough to find alternatives without committing the dreadful sin of elegant variation. And it just involves you in looking at reference books for a couple of minutes. I look in the dictionary. I check words in the dictionary a dozen times a day at least. And you find out very strange and interesting things. For instance, “widow” originally meant just “empty.” It’s an adjective meaning empty. Now that’s part of your – when you look up a word in the dictionary you own it in a way you didn’t before. You know what it comes from and you know its exact meaning. And whenever I do that (and I do it all the time) it’s as if you feel a gray cell being born in your head, a little addition to your store of knowledge. And while all the other cells are dying in a kind of genocide of the aging process you can restore it, and that’s what it feels like. And it fortifies you.
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How millennials can become a successful generation | Michael Hobbes How millennials can become a successful generation | Michael Hobbes
2 weeks ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink I think there’s this tendency to think that technology is going to save us or that technology is going to be uncomplicated when it saves us. And if you look at every technological innovation they’ve all been really complicated. And so we can’t wait for automation to save us, we can’t wait for technology to solve climate change. These are political problems; the reduction and the quality of work is a political problem that requires a political solution. There’s no app for forming a union in your workplace. There’s no app for raising the minimum wage where you live or raising taxes on rich people. These are the things we need to work toward, and we can’t wait for or hope for or expect that technology is going to offer us any solution when it never has before. If you’re a millennial one of the things that will probably make you really mad is that when our parents were protesting the Vietnam War, Americans under 45 outnumbered Americans older than 45 by two to one. So when they were electing JFK and when they were protesting the Vietnam War they could elect politicians to put them in power, whereas now, as the population has gotten older, it’s now almost 50-50; half the population is under 45 and half the population is over 45. And what that means is there’s never been an American generation that has held onto power as it aged the way that the Boomers have. The Boomers are still in power; they still out-vote us. They don’t outnumber us anymore, but because they vote at greater rates they still do outnumber us in power. The median member of Congress is 59. That is bad. If you’re a millennial you’ve spent your entire life being told by everybody from teachers to MTV that you should vote; you’ve also experienced voting getting harder. The lines are getting longer, especially in poorer areas. This is being done deliberately. Voter ID laws are coming up everywhere. It’s getting harder to vote. So yes it’s important for us to vote, but it’s also really important that when we get into power we need to make it easier to vote. I live in a state where you receive your ballot in the mail, there’s no waiting in line. You get it; you have two weeks; the postage is paid and you send it back. We have way higher turnouts, especially in primaries, than a lot of other states do. If you're working two jobs it makes perfect sense for you not to vote. Of course you're not going to stand in line for three hours. So I think what needs to be our generational project is finding all of these procedures and making them easier. It’s not just a matter of voting, we need to vote and then we need to make it easier for the next generation to vote.
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Tweak your brain chemistry toward happiness, purpose, meaning | Jillian Michaels Tweak your brain chemistry toward happiness, purpose, meaning | Jillian Michaels
2 weeks ago En
The body influences the mind: physical activity changes our brain chemistry. - More activity in the body, and therefore in the brain, reorients us toward happiness, purpose, and meaning. - Neuroplasticity suggests we can program ourselves to be more optimistic and hopeful. Jillian Michaels has been a fitness expert and wellness coach for over 20 years. In addition, she owned and operated a sports medicine facility, where she worked as a physical therapy aide under the physiatrists, physical therapists, and chiropractors. Jillian's passion for fitness training originates from 17 years of martial arts practice in Muay Thai and Akarui-Do, in which she holds a black belt. Since 1993, Jillian has held two personal training certificates from the leading certification programs in the country: the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. In addition she is Kettlebell Concepts certified. Jillian has also developed a continuing education series for trainers with AFAA and holds a nutrition and wellness consultant certificate with the American Fitness Professionals and Associates. Books, DVDs, and video games — Jillian has them all covered. She is a New York Times bestselling author of numerous books including Master Your Metabolism, Unlimited: How to Build an Exceptional Life, and her most recent bestselling release, Slim for Life: My Insider Secrets To Simple, Fast, And Lasting Weight Loss. Her first comprehensive 90-day weight loss system, Jillian Michaels Body Revolution is available in retail stores across North America, and JILLIAN MICHAELS BODYSHRED, an intense group fitness class based on Jillian's highly-effective 3-2-1 interval system, is currently taught in Crunch gyms and the YMCA in the US, exclusively at GoodLife Fitness in Canada, and is and expanding further worldwide this year. Her latest book is The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty (https://goo.gl/D69uL4) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/brain-chemistry-mind-body Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Can you trust anonymous sources in journalism? | Jill Abramson Can you trust anonymous sources in journalism? | Jill Abramson
2 weeks ago En
To cite an anonymous source, a media outlet must first enjoy a high level of credibility. - It's difficult for media outlets to stop using anonymous sources because identified past sources have been prosecuted for leaking information to reporters. Anonymity allows the sources to share information with the public with less threats of jail time and huge legal bills. - We have to suspend disbelief, and believe the reporters when anonymous sources are quoted, and decide whether a news outlet — such as BuzzFeed, amid its recent reporting regarding Michael Cohen — has our confidence and enjoys a high level of credibility. - Information naturally has more credibility, Abramson says, when it is attached to a named sourced. However, to get some crucial information to the public, there are times when anonymous sourcing is necessary. Jill Abramson is journalist who who has served in the most senior editorial positions at The New York Times, where she was the first woman to serve as Washington Bureau Chief, Managing Editor and Executive Editor. She is also an English lecturer at Harvard University and an author. Her latest book is "Merchants of Truth: The Business of News and the Fight for Facts" (https://goo.gl/weRUii) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/can-you-trust-anonymous-sources-in-journalism Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Anonymous sourcing was an issue in BuzzFeed's story about Michael Cohen saying he was directed to lie to Congress. The story as I recall was sourced to two people who were involved in an investigation of Trump Tower Moscow. But we don't know who they are. We have to suspend disbelief, and believe the reporters, and decide whether BuzzFeed news and those reporters have our confidence and enjoy a high level of credibility. I actually, after Merchants of Truth, looking so deeply at BuzzFeed news, thinks that they are careful. They have 20 investigative reporters, some quite experienced. They have great investigative editors. I think that BuzzFeed news does deserve trust. Ben Smith, the editor of BuzzFeed, has made it clear that the two reporters — Jason Leopold and Anthony Cormier — had worked on the story for months. And then they finally got hard confirmation from two sources that they were very confident in. So I'm not sure that a rush was one of the contributors to what happened there. And, frankly, I'm holding my breath, hoping that BuzzFeed is able, as soon as possible, to show that its story was true.
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Busting police brutality myths: Race, junk science, and big data | DeRay Mckesson Busting police brutality myths: Race, junk science, and big data | DeRay Mckesson
2 weeks ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink DeRay Mckesson: A lot of people don’t know is that any number you’ve ever heard about police violence comes through the aggregate of media reports. If you get killed in this country and a newspaper doesn’t write about it, it’s not covered on like a blog or like a TV or something, you literally don’t exist in the data set. The federal government doesn’t collect information about police killings in any systemic way. We can tell you the rainfall in Missouri in 1830, and we can’t actually tell you how many people got killed, like, as a hard fact last year. We don’t know it. What we know is like the aggregate of media reports, these incredible activists years ago set up these two big databases that essentially called like an advanced Google alerts of like police killings, and that is the source data for everything that you’ve ever seen on police killings. Some of the biggest databases that you might have heard of are like the Washington Post Database, fatal encounters killed by police. We created Mapping Police Violence to create the single stop database that had the most comprehensive data about police killings. If you think about the Washington Post Database, for instance, they only have killings by officers on duty that use a gun. So say for example an officer goes home and runs somebody over with their car, like that’s not counted. Say somebody is on duty and the officer runs you over with their car, not accounted. Eric Garner’s death is not in the Washington Post Database. Why? Because he wasn’t killed with a gun. So we wanted to say that like whether you got killed by a taser, a chokehold, whether the officer was at home and like killed his wife off-duty, we consider all of those to be symptoms of the same sort of root problem. So that’s why we created the database. And what we know is that, left to their own devices, that police will just never report this data. There are times where the state of Florida has reported zero police killings in entire spans of years, and you’re like “We know that’s not true, like we could just look at the news and see it wasn’t zero!” So the data actually is really important for us to help locate what the problem is and what the solution should be. And the last thing I’ll say is that we have to figure out how to start talking about police violence beyond death. So we know that the police inflict damage in communities in ways like sexual assault, verbal abuse, those sort of things, and the data we have most readily available is about death, but because we only focus on death with the data, we’re losing how the police impact women, how the police impact LGBT communities, like any other ways that don’t result in death but are still really bad—and we have to figure out how to do that. One of the limitations is that most police departments definitely don’t make that data publicly available or don’t collect it in any systemic way. So you think about police departments like Baltimore where so much of the data is on paper, you’re like “Well, who is sitting down analyzing ten million records on paper? Nobody right now,” and that becomes like a challenge. So what we found were a couple myth busters. We found things like there’s this idea that community violence and police violence are related, so in communities where there’s just a lot of violence people say that “the police just have to be there, because the communities are violent and so the police must be there. And because the police must be there it’s just more likely that they’ll probably engage in violence against communities.” And we found that that’s just not true. There are places where there’s a lot of community violence and almost no police violence, and the inverse is also true that there’s no real relationship between community violence and police violence. We also found is that black people are actually more likely to be unarmed than any other race of people who are killed by police.
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Alex Jones and white supremacy: What to do with evil ideas? | Martin Amis Alex Jones and white supremacy: What to do with evil ideas? | Martin Amis
2 weeks ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Martin Amis: Salman Rushdie has argued that you can’t be—you know, it’s idiotic to say you’re above politics, because politics is all around you and above you and beneath you. I was resistant to that idea, but it’s clearly true, isn’t it, that it’s very hard to imagine a piece of writing or a longish speech that doesn’t have political bearing on us all. So I think neutrality is a chimera. It’s not there. It’s a mythical creature. And evenhandedness is its own trap as well. I mean if the press had not been so “evenhanded” we would have President Clinton and not President Trump. Some things are so clearly wrong, so unshirkably ill-advised that I think being evenhanded about it is ridiculous. What do you do with Alex Jones and those people who harass the bereaved parents of Sandy Hook or Parkland, Florida, and say – and threaten them with death and say they’re worthless—what is the phrase – emergency actors, crisis actors. Now I’m not going to sit down and say well let’s go through your points one after the other. And we hear a great deal about being respectful to white supremacists. I’m not going to be respectful. I haven’t got it in me to be respectful of that. Some things are malum per se, evil in themselves, and the "crisis actor" business is one of them.
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Why toxic relationships are so draining. And when to break them off. | Shaka Sengor Why toxic relationships are so draining. And when to break them off. | Shaka Sengor
2 weeks ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Shaka Senghor: I think the thing that causes relationships to become toxic are many-fold. I will start by saying: pessimism. Being around people who are pessimistic about life is to me one of the greatest obstacles that stands in the way of greatness, success—whether it’s in the workspace, whether it’s in your personal life. Self-pity, people who tend to wallow in self-pity are to me some of the most toxic, especially if you have close proximity to them—intimate relations or work spaces—because that energy begins to translate, and it dims the room and it’s just really unsettling. To me I think it’s one of the things that we don’t evaluate enough in our lives, are the people that we allow to share our mental space. And when you’re allowing somebody to share your mental space you have to think of it like a pristine house. So you have this beautiful home, and when you welcome people to your beautiful home you will want them to treat it the way that you treat it and care for it. So you wouldn’t want them to walk in with some muddy boots and just come in trashing the place, but we don’t think about that when it comes to welcoming people into the interior of our minds and our hearts. And so a lot of times we’ll have people in our lives who wear those mental muddy boots and they’ll just come in and trample all around our mental space and we don’t even think nothing of it because we want to be a “nice person,” and we don’t want to say things that may come across as mean. But I think it’s important to recognize the people that you welcome into your life, recognize the quality, the shared value systems and realize when they’re being hurtful or damaging to your own sense of peace and confidence and mental well being. I think toxic relationships are some of the most time-consuming relationships. You’re constantly trying to correct behavior, you’re constantly assessing yourself based on those relationships. I grew up in an abusive household and the abuse that probably had the biggest impact was the things that was said to me and how I replay those things over and over in my mind. So you spend so much time in your own head second-guessing yourself, doubting yourself, and you can't be as productive and as successful as you're capable of as long as you're allowing that energy to take residence in your mind. And it impacts every aspect of your life; you’re not showing up as your full self; you can’t be happy. And even with the idea of happiness I think that we are delusional about what happiness is. It’s not this sustained thing, but it’s access to a part of ourselves that allows us to have joy. And so when you think about what do you need in order to have that it has to be fulfillment. And you can’t have a fulfillment in your life and in your workspace as long as you have toxic people occupying those spaces. So I think the way that you prevent a relationship from becoming toxic is you have to set real boundaries. Those boundaries start with: what are the expectations? What are the rules of engagement? What is acceptable behavior? What is acceptable treatment? And that starts with you setting the standards for yourself. How do you show up in your own life? How do you treat yourself? What do you expect from yourself? And that extends outwardly. And what I found is that when you’re dealing with people who are toxic, sometimes they don’t even realize they’re toxic because they’re just repeating the cycle of hurt people hurting people. And even though all toxic relationships don’t show up as necessarily intentional hurt, it can be intentional hindrance or unintentional hindrance. And so to me you have to set those boundaries very early. And once a relationship has already become toxic you have to make a choice in terms of what do you value more: do you value your peace of mind and sense of purpose more than you value the relationship?
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Who is getting rich off you? The insidious big data economy. | Rita Gunther McGrath Who is getting rich off you? The insidious big data economy. | Rita Gunther McGrath
2 weeks ago En
Where is your data now? Follow the money. - Your day to day actions on the Internet give businesses personal data that turns you into an ad target – or the opposite. - Facebook, for example, allowed landlords to block demographic groups such as African Americans, LGBTQ, or disabled people from seeing housing ads – a violation of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. - Data brokers have crossed a line, but the laws that should regulate them are outdated; just look at the billion-dollar data deal between 23andMe and Big Pharma. Is it ethical? Rita Gunther McGrath, a professor at Columbia Business School, is one of the world’s top experts on innovation and growth. She is the author of the best-selling book The End of Competitive Advantage (https://goo.gl/77RdHE) (Harvard Business Review Press, 2013) and the upcoming book Seeing Around Corners (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sept. 2019). Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/who-is-getting-rich-off-you-the-insidious-big-data-economy Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink A conservative estimate of how much your personal information is worth to these data brokers is on the order of $240 a year for each of us, for millions and millions of people. And that adds up to a really, really big number. And a lot of that data, right, and the advertising against that data is just getting sucked out of conventional sources and going right into the pockets of the big data brokers like Facebook and Google and even Amazon, also a whole bevy of smaller data brokers-- you know, people who run little websites like, you know, Housekeepers Like Me and, you know, do you have insurance, and are you in the market for a new car? And people willingly hand over this information, which then gets aggregated and copied across databases and then put into this package which advertisers can then use to target you. I think we're just at that very early stages where a few people are sounding the alarm. But that has not spread out to the masses yet. I mean, all those people posting about their grandkids on Facebook don't understand...
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China's double boom: From ‘Made in China’ to ‘Sell to China' China's double boom: From ‘Made in China’ to ‘Sell to China'
3 weeks ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Black hole death: How extreme tidal forces turn humans into spaghetti | Michelle Thaller Black hole death: How extreme tidal forces turn humans into spaghetti | Michelle Thaller
3 weeks ago En
- Like ocean tides caused by gravity, a nearby black hole would create a 'tide' inside your body, which is mostly water. - As your body drew nearer to the black hole, your head would be stretched away from your feet. - Scientists call this streching "spaghettification", from the word of spaghetti. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/black-holes-turn-humans-to-spaghetti Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink So Jemima, you ask a really interesting question, do the tides affect the water in our body? Now the simple answer is no, but let's talk about why that's true. The tides are caused every day by the moon and the sun stretching the earth, the gravity actually stretches the earth apart just a little bit. Now the earth is a very large object, but think about smaller things now. Do you ever notice tides on a lake? For a very large lake like the Great Lakes there might be a little bit of a tidal difference every day, but it's actually kind of hard to measure. What about a smaller lake or a pond? What about something like a swimming pool? I think even in your own experience you can see that smaller objects don't really have any tidal differences across the day and that's just because of the size. As we said the tides are caused by the gravity of the moon and the sun stretching the earth, but now take it down to a really, really tiny scale. Over really small scales there just isn't much of an effect, you really can't sense it at all it just becomes unimportant. Now the interesting thing is that this would not be the case if we were around something like a black hole. If you were around a black hole, which is a dead star, and say the mass of the black hole was about 20 times the mass of the sun, a black hole like that is actually not very physically large you have all that mass but the black hole itself may only be say on the order of 30 miles across. That means you have all that mass packed into a tiny little area. If you were nearby a black hole that means there really would be a detectable gravity stretching across something as small as your body and not just the water in your body would feel that. As you got closer and closer to a black hole you would actually feel your head stretched away from your feet. There would be tidal forces, just like the earth goes through with the sun and the moon, but next to a black hole the gravity is so extreme there would be tides over something as small as a human body. Get closer and closer to a black hole and your head keeps getting stretch more and your feet keep getting stretched that way and you would actually turn you into a stream of particles. Scientists have a really cool name for this it's called spaghettification from the word of spaghetti. If you got close to a black hole there would be tides over your body that small that would rip you apart into basically a strand of spaghetti that would fall down the black hole.
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Launch the next big education startup. Enter the Lumina Prize! Launch the next big education startup. Enter the Lumina Prize!
3 weeks ago En
Welcome to the Lumina Prize! Big Think and Lumina Foundation are joining together to identify and help scale leading innovations in education after high school. We are looking to introduce social entrepreneurs with the most innovative solutions in post-high school education to the world. Winners will receive a free trip to New York to receive media training from Big Think’s producers and a team of social venture advisors. From there, your business pitch will be filmed as a real Big Think clip and shared with the world. We are seeking the most innovative solutions to this challenge. Five semi-finalists will be chosen and posted on our website for our audience to vote. From those five, we will choose both a People’s Choice winner and an Experts Choice winner who will be flown to NYC for a BigThink interview. Please take the next 30 minutes to share some information about your breakthrough solution. Thank you for entering the contest! To enter the Lumina Prize, head to https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/lumina-prize - Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all. Its goal is to prepare people for informed citizenship and for success in a global economy. - Jamie Merisotis is a globally recognized leader in philanthropy, education, and public policy. Since 2008, he has served as president and CEO of Lumina Foundation, an independent, private foundation that is committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all. Merisotis is the author of the widely-acclaimed book America Needs Talent, named a Top 10 Business Book of 2016 by Booklist. His writing has appeared in The Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Washington Monthly, Politico, and other publications. Transcript: Our model is really predicated on the idea that we need large-scale change. We need system change, not tinkering at the margins. We actually need to focus on a much broader model of learning and working. So in this model all learning should count. It shouldn't just be the kinds of learning that you get when you go to a traditional learning enterprise, a college or university. Innovation is something that we've long talked about but today innovation is really critical to success in the system. We need innovation that actually focuses on two key objectives. The first one is time, that is the pace of change that's happening today requires innovation that is much more rapid than what we've seen in the past. So we need more like a rapid prototyping model of innovation than what we might have had in the past where you would do some experiments, do some innovation and then hope for some change. The second important thing is scale. The nature of the change that's required is actually going to have to be at scale. In other words, the innovation actually has to be focused on the fact that it's going to serve a large number of people – that it's actually going to solve large-scale social problems. So innovation in the past and particularly philanthropic organizations trying to support innovation have often been focused on germinating new ideas with the hope that at some time these things will achieve scale. Today, we need to be focusing on innovation that is actually going to take place much more rapidly and is actually going to be focused, from the get-go, on scale. Our objective in this work is quite simple. First, we want to work with entrepreneurs and discover the best ideas that are out there that might help us achieve this large-scale impact that we want to achieve. The second is to elevate those ideas through this partnership with Big Think in ways that will give them a platform, give them visibility. And the third is actually to work with the entrepreneurs to achieve the scale impact that's necessary. And so our model here is to help uncover, discover those big ideas, actually help to elevate them and then work with the entrepreneurs to achieve the scale that's needed...
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How to ask for a raise as a millennial | Michael Hobbes How to ask for a raise as a millennial | Michael Hobbes
3 weeks ago En
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3 ways to see misleading emotions more clearly | Shane Parrish 3 ways to see misleading emotions more clearly | Shane Parrish
4 weeks ago En
- Our emotions can lead us astray. - Just because you have an intense feeling doesn't mean you need to urgently act on it. - Shane Parrish has some tips for being more mindful of your feelings and more accountable for them. Shane Parrish is a former Canadian intelligence officer and the founder of Farnam Street, a go-to resource that CEOs, athletes, professional coaches and entrepreneurs rely on to find signal in a world of noise. Shane’s work has been featured in nearly every major publication, including Forbes, Huffington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and most recently, the New York Times. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/3-ways-to-see-misleading-emotions-more-clearly Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why I wear my life on my skin | Damien Echols on tattoos Why I wear my life on my skin | Damien Echols on tattoos
4 weeks ago En
For Damien Echols, tattoos are part of his existential armor. - In prison Damien Echols was known by his number SK931, not his name, and had his hair sheared off. Stripped of his identity, the only thing he had left was his skin. - This is why he began tattooing things that are meaningful to him — to carry a "suit of armor" made up the images of the people and objects that have significance to him, from his friends to talismans. - Echols believes that all places are imbued with divinity: "If you interact with New York City as if there's an intelligence behind... then it will behave towards you the same way." Damien Echols is the author of the New York Times bestseller Life After Death (Plume, 2013), and his new book, HIGH MAGICK: A Guide to the Spiritual Practices That Saved My Life on Death Row. (https://goo.gl/QuN3W2) He lives with his wife, Lorri, in Harlem. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/top-video-splash/why-i-have-tattoos Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Tattoos for me, one of the reasons I started to get them is because when I was in prison, when you go to prison they completely strip you of an identity. You don't even have a name anymore. You're given a number. My number was SK931. That means I was the 931st person sentenced to death in Arkansas. To the state of Arkansas I was not Damien Echols. I was inmate SK931. They take your clothes, they take your name. There were even times when I was shackled to a chair and had my head shaved against my will just to make you look like every other prisoner in the prison. They don't want any form of identity, any form of humanity. So I learned that pretty much everything can be stripped away from you except your skin. That was why I started tattooing things that were meaningful to me, bonds I shared with other people, friends, anyone from Johnny Depp and Peter Jackson. We got tattooed together to just people that were friends of mine in the tattoo shop. It's like if you have a photograph you can lose that photograph. It can be torn up. It can be disintegrated through time. But whenever you carry something on your body it's almost like you have a suit of armor made out of the things that are meaningful to you. So a lot of the things I have on me were not only things that I shared with friends like representative of bonds that I had with other people but I started to also use talismans, sigils. What talismans are we were talking about thought forms a while ago. Well some things are really hard to visualize. If you want to put energy into manifesting something say, for example, happiness. So you don't know what will make you happy. You just know that you're not happy at this particular time in your life. You're not happy with your job but you don't know what job would make you happy. You're not happy in your relationship and you don't know exactly what sort of relationship you want to be in that would bring happiness. You can use a talisman or a sigil to take a concept like happiness and break it down into a symbolic form that will bypass the conscious mind and can be fired directly into the subconscious because it just looks like a squiggly line for the most part. It looks like an alphabet that your conscious mind doesn't read. So it bypasses all of the thought processes, goes deep into your unconscious psyche and can then work in whatever way it works down there. I don't know how some of this stuff works. I just know it does work. If you break it down into just a symbol and then put the energy, put the chi into that symbol you can manifest something that you may not necessarily be able to picture like happiness or protection or love.
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Facebook and Google got rich. Users paid the price. | Douglas Rushkoff Facebook and Google got rich. Users paid the price. | Douglas Rushkoff
1 month ago En
- Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes. - Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that? - But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/facebook-and-google-got-rich-users-paid-the-price Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink The reason why Facebook and Google are so easy to hack is because their business models are so easy to hack. Both Facebook and Google, when they started out, said that what will make them superior to the things they're replacing is that they're going to be ad free. Because they knew, from square one, if they were going to have advertising, then the entire platform could be leveraged for the opposite of its original purpose. So Google, when they were fighting against Yahoo, they said, oh, no, we're going to be the people's algorithm. We're going to use the way that people all link to other things as the way in which we deliver search. And unlike Yahoo, which is basically ad supported and all this, well, what is Google now? Google is the world's biggest advertising agency. Likewise, Facebook said, 'no, no, no, we're not going to use ads.' We're just going to be there for people to be able to connect with one another. It's going all be social, so it's going to be honest and free. They became an ad-supported platform, too. So what's happening is their business models are being leveraged by companies that understand Facebook wants attention by any means necessary. And as long as that's their goal-- they might not be conscious of it. As long as that's the goal of the platform, then they're going to be used that way...
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Why 'upgrading' humanity is a transhumanist myth | Douglas Rushkoff Why 'upgrading' humanity is a transhumanist myth | Douglas Rushkoff
1 month ago En
Upload your mind? Here's a reality check on the Singularity. - Though computer engineers claim to know what human consciousness is, many neuroscientists say that we're nowhere close to understanding what it is, or its source. - Scientists are currently trying to upload human minds to silicon chips, or re-create consciousness with algorithms, but this may be hubristic because we still know so little about what it means to be human. -Is transhumanism a journey forward or an escape from reality? Douglas Rushkoff is the host of the Team Human podcast and a professor of digital economics at CUNY/Queens. He is also the author of a dozen bestselling books on media, technology, and culture, including, Present Shock, Program or Be Programmed, Media Virus, and Team Human, the last of which is his latest work (https://goo.gl/QmibYm). Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/douglas-rushkoff-critiques-transhumanism Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Space toilets: How astronauts boldly go where few have gone before | Michelle Thaller Space toilets: How astronauts boldly go where few have gone before | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
A NASA astronomer explains how astronauts dispose of their, uh, dark matter. - When nature calls in micro-gravity, astronauts must answer. Space agencies have developed suction-based toilets – with a camera built in to ensure all the waste is contained before "flushing". - Yes, there have been floaters in space. The early days of space exploration were a learning curve! - Amazingly, you don't need gravity to digest food. Peristalsis, the process by which your throat and intestines squeeze themselves, actually moves food and water through your digestive system without gravity at all. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA.gov Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-do-astronauts-poop-in-space Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink A really fun question is that when astronauts are in space they're not experiencing gravity, so how does digestion work? We sort of think of food moving down in our bodies, it seems that maybe gravity would have something to do with that. The amazing thing is that it really doesn't and this was one of the first things we discovered when we sent animals first and then people up into space. Some people wondered if you could swallow, if you could digest at all without the force of gravity. And it turns out that the act of peristalsis, the way your throat and your intestines squeeze themselves, will actually move food and water through your digestive system without gravity at all and you can even test that with people lying in hospital beds. When you think about somebody that's actually lying down, there's no force of gravity that's pulling food in one direction or the other. The human body is actually pretty good at moving food through without the force of gravity. Now other part of this is what happens when the food comes out the other end, because this is a natural thing that all humans do every day. Well, you've now reached the wonderful science of space toilets. They actually act with suction. Now if you've ever been to the dentist's office and the dentist wants you to spit and he holds up a little cup with a tube attached to it and there's suction that takes the water down the tube. A space toilet acts very much that way; there's suction, there's a current of air that actually draws the waste down so it can be disposed of. And, honestly, sometimes it doesn't work perfectly. This is one of the things that astronauts have to deal with. When you think about the word 'floater', that has happened, where something escapes and you need to go get it. Some of the worst parts of human space flight in the very early days, like in Gemini all the way back in the 1960s, was people would collect their urine in a little plastic bag and sometimes they broke. So there have been some people up there and some very bad circumstances. Today, the toilet on the space station works very well and suction brings everything down and the best thing I can compare it to is the dentist's spit cup. They actually have a little video camera so you can see if anything is floating around in the toilet before you get up. Yeah.
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Wealth inequality is literally killing us. The economy should work for everyone. | Alissa Quart Wealth inequality is literally killing us. The economy should work for everyone. | Alissa Quart
1 month ago En
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The dos and don’ts of helping a drug addict recover | Maia Szalavitz The dos and don’ts of helping a drug addict recover | Maia Szalavitz
1 month ago En
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Student debt: An American horror story | Michael Hobbes Student debt: An American horror story | Michael Hobbes
1 month ago En
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Jillian Michael's 6 health keys to conquer aging Jillian Michael's 6 health keys to conquer aging
1 month ago En
6 keys to warding off premature death. - Getting older is inevitable. But with diet, exercise, and some insight into how the human body works, you can do your best to keep your body from aging prematurely. - Meal timing, combined with 12 hours of fasting, can actually do more for your body than you might realize. - Did you know stress can literally alter your DNA? And did you know that biological ways to combat the stress can even be passed down to your kids? Jillian Michaels has been a fitness expert and wellness coach for over 20 years. In addition, she owned and operated a sports medicine facility, where she worked as a physical therapy aide under the physiatrists, physical therapists, and chiropractors. Jillian's passion for fitness training originates from 17 years of martial arts practice in Muay Thai and Akarui-Do, in which she holds a black belt. Since 1993, Jillian has held two personal training certificates from the leading certification programs in the country: the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. In addition she is Kettlebell Concepts certified. Jillian has also developed a continuing education series for trainers with AFAA and holds a nutrition and wellness consultant certificate with the American Fitness Professionals and Associates. Books, DVDs, and video games — Jillian has them all covered. She is a New York Times bestselling author of numerous books including Master Your Metabolism, Unlimited: How to Build an Exceptional Life, and her most recent bestselling release, Slim for Life: My Insider Secrets To Simple, Fast, And Lasting Weight Loss. Her first comprehensive 90-day weight loss system, Jillian Michaels Body Revolution is available in retail stores across North America, and JILLIAN MICHAELS BODYSHRED, an intense group fitness class based on Jillian's highly-effective 3-2-1 interval system, is currently taught in Crunch gyms and the YMCA in the US, exclusively at GoodLife Fitness in Canada, and is and expanding further worldwide this year. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-do-i-prevent-aging Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why boys are the future of change in the #MeToo movement | Gretchen Carlson Why boys are the future of change in the #MeToo movement | Gretchen Carlson
1 month ago En
Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink So trying to fix the whole issue of sexual harassment in our society is a tangled web. I didn’t even know that when I set out on my journey in July of 2016. And so there’s not really any easy fix. And as a result one of the key components I believe is the way in which we choose to raise our children because that’s where it really all starts. What I found out over the last couple of years is that we spend an inordinate amount of time trying to empower our young girls and we do a really great job with that. There are tons of organizations out there that do good work. But when we talk about sexual harassment as only a girl or women’s issue we’re really doing a disservice to it, because quite honestly it’s really a man’s issue. You know the preponderance of predators are men, and in the way in which we call it a “women’s issue,” first of all, there’s almost a negative connotation that comes with that, unfortunately. And the other variant with that is that men just tune out. They just are like “Oh, I don’t have to worry about that.” And so with our sons we keep thinking that the way in which we’re going to fix this problem is to empower our young girls more. But we’re already doing a great job at that. So really where we need to be focused is: what are we telling our sons? How are we teaching them to respect young girls who are their colleagues in school growing up, young women who are with them on college campuses, and then young women who are with them eventually in the workforce. Because if we don’t get to our boys young, to instill that respect, it’s almost too late to try and change when men are in their thirties and forties and fifties and onward. Recently I just read an article about how men are fearful about this whole Me Too era and they’re not going to hire women anymore. They’re not going to take them out to business dinners or spend time with them alone. And to me that’s really a copout. We should be teaching our young boys that this is how you behave when you’re in the company of a woman, and that’s when you’re at a restaurant and that’s when you’re in the workplace. So men know how to treat women! But teaching our young boys is an essential part of this equation.
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Why ‘mom guilt’ is an unreasonable term | Lauren Smith Brody Why ‘mom guilt’ is an unreasonable term | Lauren Smith Brody
1 month ago En
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How financial literacy impacts youth prostitution, AIDS, and women’s survival How financial literacy impacts youth prostitution, AIDS, and women’s survival
1 month ago En
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Would scientists tell us about a looming apocalypse? | Michelle Thaller Would scientists tell us about a looming apocalypse? | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
If a doomsday asteroid is set to collide with Earth, you're going to know about it – whether you want to or not. - NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller fields one question with a heavy heart: If scientists knew there was a catastrophic asteroid heading towards Earth, would they tell us? - What about aliens? Is NASA hiding aliens from the public? Are they "in" on conspiracy theories? Scientists are, on the contrary, eager to communicate their findings to the media and the public, says Thaller. -"To me it speaks to the separation that somehow scientists are this monolithic inhuman group; that we could hide things, that we would want to," says Thaller. No single telescope owns the sky. If there's a doomsday asteroid coming, scientists all over the world are going to let the world know about it. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/nasa-space-conspiracy-theories Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Anthony, I often get asked this question, if scientists actually knew that there was an impending catastrophic collision, some asteroid was heading towards earth, would they tell you? And the answer is yes. We actually study the sky every night we’re looking for objects that might be on a collision course with earth and if we find anything that even looks risky we inform lots of people. The other thing is that the sky is available to anybody on the earth, no one government owns the sky, there are telescopes everywhere on the planet, there’s no way that anybody could hide the fact that some big asteroid was on a course with the earth. So one of the things that I find very difficult as a scientist is people often ask the question: “Would scientists tell us if something really bad was about to happen?” And you think about that sentence and you have to ask the question who is the us here? Am I not part of us? I remember back I think it was in 2012 there was this idea that the Mayan apocalypse was going to come that the world was going to end, it was all over the news and I actually got a phone call from somebody. I was sitting at my desk at NASA and somebody asked me the question, “Is the world going to end next week?” And I thought about that because, of course, we knew that the world was not going to end, there was nothing happening astronomically that we could tell, but I realized this person didn’t think of me as an actual human being – that if I knew the world was going to end in a week I would be at work at my desk. I don’t think so. The day you have all the scientists buy up all the great wine and max out their credit cards and disappear then you might want to worry, but even that’s not how we work, we are people and if we knew something dangerous was coming there would be no way for us to hide it. Now, one of the things that NASA is researching right now is how to actually alleviate a bad collision. If we see a big asteroid coming toward us on a collision course there are actually many things we could do to avert the asteroid a little bit, have it miss the earth, and we‘re studying those right now. But in the past whenever we’ve even seen something that looked slightly risky we’ve gone to the government about it, we’ve gone to the people, we’ve gone to the press. We have nothing to hide. And this is something that is really difficult in my life. People are saying are you hiding aliens? Are you hiding evidence of this? Are you hiding the fact that an asteroid is going to blow us up or whatever? And to me it speaks to the separation that somehow scientists are this monolithic inhuman group that we could hide things, that we would want to. Instead we’ve been trying to involve the public in everything that we do. I know this will not convince the conspiracy theories out there, but one of the things I love most about our science is how accessible it is and how much we would tell you even if something bad was going to happen.
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How to be a good parent to artificial intelligence | Ben Goertzel How to be a good parent to artificial intelligence | Ben Goertzel
1 month ago En
Human values evolve. So how will we raise virtuous A.I.s? - Until we can design a mind that's superhuman and flawless, we'll have to settle for instilling plain old human values into artificial intelligence. But how to do this in a world where values are constantly evolving? - Many of our life choices today would be considered immoral by people in the Middle Ages — or even the 1970s, says Ben Goertzel, whose family personally experienced the sad state of LGBTQ acceptance in Southern New Jersey 50 years ago. - Raising an A.I. is a lot like raising kids, says Goertzel. Kids don't learn best from a list of rules, but from lived experience – watching and imitating their parents. A.I.s and humans will have to play and learn side by side, and evolve together as values adapt toward an increasingly technological future. Ben Goertzel is CEO and chief scientist at SingularityNET, a project dedicated to creating benevolent decentralized artificial general intelligence. He is also chief scientist of financial prediction firm Aidyia Holdings and robotics firm Hanson Robotics; Chairman of AI software company Novamente LLC; Chairman of the Artificial General Intelligence Society and the OpenCog Foundation.His latest book is AGI Revolution: An Inside View of the Rise of Artificial General Intelligence (https://goo.gl/fuUXen) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-to-be-a-good-parent-to-artificial-intelligence Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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We could cut the opioid death rate by 50% – but we’re not | Maia Szalavitz We could cut the opioid death rate by 50% – but we’re not | Maia Szalavitz
1 month ago En
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How Big Pharma secures drug monopolies | Tahir Amin How Big Pharma secures drug monopolies | Tahir Amin
1 month ago En
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Jillian Michaels: Don't believe the keto diet hype Jillian Michaels: Don't believe the keto diet hype
1 month ago En
Thou cannot live on steak and avocados alone. - Keto diets have attracted a lot of media attention lately, and are becoming quite the rage in wellness circles. - But while it might make you lose weight in the short term, it's doing one heck of a number on your body. - Fitness expert and all-around great person Jillian Michaels walks us through whey keto might be a no-no. Jillian Michaels has been a fitness expert and wellness coach for over 20 years. In addition, she owned and operated a sports medicine facility, where she worked as a physical therapy aide under the physiatrists, physical therapists, and chiropractors. Jillian's passion for fitness training originates from 17 years of martial arts practice in Muay Thai and Akarui-Do, in which she holds a black belt. Since 1993, Jillian has held two personal training certificates from the leading certification programs in the country: the National Exercise & Sports Trainers Association and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. In addition she is Kettlebell Concepts certified. Jillian has also developed a continuing education series for trainers with AFAA and holds a nutrition and wellness consultant certificate with the American Fitness Professionals and Associates. Books, DVDs, and video games — Jillian has them all covered. She is a New York Times bestselling author of numerous books including Master Your Metabolism, Unlimited: How to Build an Exceptional Life, and her most recent bestselling release, Slim for Life: My Insider Secrets To Simple, Fast, And Lasting Weight Loss. Her first comprehensive 90-day weight loss system, Jillian Michaels Body Revolution is available in retail stores across North America, and JILLIAN MICHAELS BODYSHRED, an intense group fitness class based on Jillian's highly-effective 3-2-1 interval system, is currently taught in Crunch gyms and the YMCA in the US, exclusively at GoodLife Fitness in Canada, and is and expanding further worldwide this year. Michael's latest book is The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty (https://amzn.to/2C3jWuR) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/keto-diet-bad Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Short-term thinking is politics’ most epic failure | Jill Lepore Short-term thinking is politics’ most epic failure | Jill Lepore
1 month ago En
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Humans take psychedelics. Should robots? | Ben Goertzel Humans take psychedelics. Should robots? | Ben Goertzel
1 month ago En
Psychedelics are crude drugs. Could neuroscience and super-intelligent AI help us design something better? - The illegal status of psychedelic substances is a terrible thing, says Ben Goertzel. With everything happening behind closed doors, our societies are not developing the right set of cultural institutions to guide people in the productive use of psychedelics. - Once scientists have mastered artificial general intelligence (AGI), the psychedelic experience could be engineered for the modern world – it would be safer, less haphazard, and more meaningful. We would "trip" by jacking our brains into the superhuman AGI mind cloud. - "We're going to be exploring states of consciousness that go way beyond anything we can imagine now and way beyond anything that the very crude psychedelic drugs that exist allow us access to," Goertzel says. Ben Goertzel is CEO and chief scientist at SingularityNET, a project dedicated to creating benevolent decentralized artificial general intelligence. He is also chief scientist of financial prediction firm Aidyia Holdings and robotics firm Hanson Robotics; Chairman of AI software company Novamente LLC; Chairman of the Artificial General Intelligence Society and the OpenCog Foundation.His latest book is AGI Revolution: An Inside View of the Rise of Artificial General Intelligence (https://goo.gl/fuUXen) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/psychedelic-drugs-artificial-intelligence-brain-interface Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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3 proofs that debunk flat-Earth theory | Big Think Top Ten 2018 | Michelle Thaller 3 proofs that debunk flat-Earth theory | Big Think Top Ten 2018 | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
We're finally here! We've been counting down the 10 most popular videos of 2018. This is #1... - Hey flat Earthers, it's time to put your theory to bed once and for all! "There are so many proofs that the Earth is round, it's difficult to know where to start. And it's not okay to think that the Earth is flat; this is not a viable argument," says NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller. Thaller explains three observable proofs that instantly debunk flat-Earth theory with irrefutable evidence of the Earth's round, curvaceous, gloriously spherical shape. - The ancient Greeks figured out we were living on a sphere over 2,000 years ago, and there are things you can do to prove that the Earth is indeed round—just go to a body of water and look at ships or boats on the horizon with binoculars. Watch the video for the details! You can follow Michelle Thaller on Twitter at @mlthaller. - Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-flat-earth-theory-proof Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Jordan Peterson: The fatal flaw lurking in American leftist politics | Big Think Top Ten 2018 Jordan Peterson: The fatal flaw lurking in American leftist politics | Big Think Top Ten 2018
1 month ago En
The countdown continues! This is the #2 most popular video of 2018. Can the left wing grow from this critique? - What is political extremism? Professor of psychology Jordan Peterson points out that America knows what right-wing radicalism looks like: white nationalism. "What's interesting is that on the conservative side of the spectrum, we've figured out how to box-in the radicals and say, 'No, you're outside the domain of acceptable opinion,'" says Peterson. But where's that line for the Left? There is no universal marker of what extreme liberalism looks like, which is devastating to the ideology itself but also to political discourse as a whole. - Peterson is happy to suggest such a marker: "The doctrine of equality of outcome. It seems to me that that's where people who are thoughtful on the Left should draw the line, and say no. Equality of opportunity? [That's] not only fair enough, but laudable. But equality of outcome…? It's like: 'No, you've crossed the line. We're not going there with you.'" - Peterson argues that it's the ethical responsibility of left-leaning people to identify liberal extremism and distinguish themselves from it the same way conservatives distance themselves from the doctrine of racial superiority. Failing to recognize such extremism may be liberalism's fatal flaw. Jordan B. Peterson, raised and toughened in the frigid wastelands of Northern Alberta, has flown a hammer-head roll in a carbon-fiber stunt-plane, explored an Arizona meteorite crater with astronauts, and built a Kwagu'l ceremonial bighouse on the upper floor of his Toronto home after being invited into and named by that Canadian First Nation. He's taught mythology to lawyers, doctors and business people, consulted for the UN Secretary General, helped his clinical clients manage depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, and schizophrenia, served as an adviser to senior partners of major Canadian law firms, and lectured extensively in North America and Europe. With his students and colleagues at Harvard and the University of Toronto, Dr. Peterson has published over a hundred scientific papers, transforming the modern understanding of personality, while his book Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief revolutionized the psychology of religion. His latest book is 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos (https://goo.gl/J7CLCe) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-jordan-peterson-leftist-liberal-politics Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Superhumans: The remarkable brain waves of high-level meditators | Top Ten 2018 | Dan Goleman Superhumans: The remarkable brain waves of high-level meditators | Top Ten 2018 | Dan Goleman
1 month ago En
The countdown continues! This is the #3 most popular video of 2018. - People who have meditated for thousands of hours exhibit a remarkable difference in their gamma brainwaves. - "All of us get gamma for a very short period when we solve a problem we've been grappling with, even if it's something that's vexed us for months. We get about half second of gamma; it's the strongest wave in the EEG spectrum," explains Goleman. - In high-level mediators, gamma is a lasting state they experience constantly. Science has never seen it before. - Psychologist and author Daniel Goleman says we can actually see what happens in the heads of those who have achieved "enlightenment" and the results are unprecedented in science. Daniel Goleman is a psychologist, lecturer, and science journalist who has reported on the brain and behavioral sciences for The New York Times for many years. His 1995 book, Emotional Intelligence (Bantam Books) was on The New York Times bestseller list for a year and a half. Goleman is also the author of Ecological Intelligence: How Knowing the Hidden Impacts of What We Buy Can Change Everything. The book argues that new information technologies will create “radical transparency,” allowing us to know the environmental, health, and social consequences of what we buy. As shoppers use point-of-purchase ecological comparisons to guide their purchases, market share will shift to support steady, incremental upgrades in how products are made – changing every thing for the better. His latest book is Altered Traits: Science Reveals How Meditation Changes Your Mind, Brain, and Body, which he has co-authored with Richard Davidson reveals the science of what meditation can really do for us, as well as exactly how to get the most out of it. Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Michio Kaku: Let’s not advertise our existence to aliens | Big Think Top Ten 2018 Michio Kaku: Let’s not advertise our existence to aliens | Big Think Top Ten 2018
1 month ago En
The countdown continues! The 4th most popular video from 2018 involves humanity hiding behind a tree. - If advanced alien civilizations do exist, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku asks: Why would they want anything to do with us? It would be like an academic talking to a squirrel, he suggests, and he has a great point. - Hollywood and science fiction novels have conditioned us for years to believe that aliens either want to hang out on our intellectual level and learn from us... or destroy us. If alien life really does have the technology and know-how to make it all the way here, perhaps we should just play it cool and not assume that we are the top species in the universe. - Kaku speculates that our hypothetical demise would come at the hands of an intelligence civilization that sees us as no more than deer in the woods and wipes us out by accident — just as we have done to (what we deem) less remarkable species since time immemorial. Our best bet for survival? Lie low. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-michio-kaku-alien-civilizations Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Bored at work? Your brain is trying to tell you something. | Big Think Top Ten 2018 | Dan Cable Bored at work? Your brain is trying to tell you something. | Big Think Top Ten 2018 | Dan Cable
1 month ago En
The countdown continues! This is the 5th most popular video of 2018 — for good reason. - We've all been bored on the job at least once in our lives, but that boredom is actually very old human wiring. We constantly seek out new information to keep our minds sharp, and when tasks get repetitive we get bored and move on. - But what if you can't move on? What if the tasks are your job and you have to repeat them day after day to keep a roof over your head? That, says London Business School professor Dan Cable, is why boredom has become an epidemic. - Our brains aren't used to staying in their lanes, so perhaps that boredom is not a bug after all, but a feature. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-why-am-i-bored-at-work Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How to spot high-conflict people before it's too late | Big Think Top Ten 2018 | Bill Eddy How to spot high-conflict people before it's too late | Big Think Top Ten 2018 | Bill Eddy
1 month ago En
The countdown continues! This is the 6th most popular video of 2018 — and it could save you years of trouble. - Here's a fast fact about high-conflict people: life is better when you avoid them. Bill Eddy, mediation expert and president of the High Conflict Institute, describes them not only as difficult but also potentially dangerous. - So how can we avoid becoming a target in their path of destruction? First, you have to be able to recognize them, says Eddy. They tend to share these four key characteristics: a preoccupation with blaming others, all-or-nothing thinking, unmanaged emotions, and extreme behaviors. - Once you know what you're dealing with—a textbook high-conflict personality—you can take measures to manage this relationship, whether it's at home, at work, or beyond. Eddy shares his matter-of-fact methods for withdrawing from these people or, if that's not an option, for how to resist their conflict lures and disengage from the drama. Bill Eddy is the co-founder and president of the High Conflict Institute, a company devoted to helping individuals and organizations deal with high-conflict people. Eddy is a Certified Family Law Specialist and Senior Family Mediator at the National Conflict Resolution Center in San Diego. He is also a Licensed Clinical Social worker with twelve years' experience providing therapy to children, adults, couples and families in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient clinics. Eddy is the author of 5 Types of People Who Can Ruin Your Life: Identifying and Dealing with Narcissists, Sociopaths, and Other High-Conflict Personalities (https://goo.gl/YquAWY) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-how-to-avoid-evil-personalities Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How religion turned American politics into a bizarre anti-science spectacle | Big Think Top 10 2018 How religion turned American politics into a bizarre anti-science spectacle | Big Think Top 10 2018
1 month ago En
The countdown continues! This is the 7th most popular video of 2018 - In the last 30 years, religion has radicalized American politics and seriously harmed the perception of science, says journalist and author Kurt Andersen. This can be directly tied to the rise of the Christian Right in the 20th century. - To see this, you only have to look at the response to the same question posed to Republican presidential candidates over three election cycles, from 2008 to 2016: "Do you believe in Darwinian biological evolution?" In 2008, the majority answered yes. In 2012, there were notably less. In 2016? There was only one of 17 candidates who said he did—Jeb Bush, and even he backpedaled. - From climate change to Creationism and outright conspiracy theories, Andersen points to how the Republican party has come to increasingly incorporate fantasy and wishful untruths into its approach to social, economic, and foreign policy—and it's turning America into an anti-science spectacle. Kurt Andersen, host of Studio 360 on NPR, is a journalist and the author of the novels Hey Day, Turn of the Century, The Real Thing, and his latest non-fiction book Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History (https://goo.gl/e6fgzn). He has written and produced prime-time network television programs and pilots for NBC and ABC, and co-authored Loose Lips, an off-Broadway theatrical revue that had long runs in New York and Los Angeles. He is a regular columnist for New York Magazine, and contributes frequently to Vanity Fair. He is also a founder of Very Short List. Andersen began his career in journalism at NBC's Today program and at Time, where he was an award-winning writer on politics and criminal justice and for eight years the magazine's architecture and design critic. Returning to Time in 1993 as editor-at-large, he wrote a weekly column on culture. And from 1996 through 1999 he was a staff writer and columnist for The New Yorker. He was a co-founder of Inside.com, editorial director of Colors magazine, and editor-in-chief of both New York and Spy magazines, the latter of which he also co-founded. From 2004 through 2008 he wrote a column called "The Imperial City" for New York (one of which is included in The Best American Magazine Writing 2008). In 2008 Forbes. com named him one of The 25 Most Influential Liberals in the U.S. Media. Anderson graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, and is a member of the boards of trustees of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, the Pratt Institute, and is currently Visionary in Residence at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. He lives with his family in New York City. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-religion-science-politics-america Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Pablo Escobar’s hippos: Why drug lords shouldn’t play God | Big Think Top 10 2018 #10 | Lucy Cooke Pablo Escobar’s hippos: Why drug lords shouldn’t play God | Big Think Top 10 2018 #10 | Lucy Cooke
1 month ago En
Let the countdown begin! History and science (and danger) come together in our 10th most popular video of 2018. - Lucy Cooke—an acclaimed zoologist, author, and TV presenter—tells the story of Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar's exotic animal menagerie, which included four hippos illegally imported from Africa. - Four hippos became eight, and eight became sixteen, and now this non-native creature is running wild in South America. Cooke explains why this is a moment in evolution — these hippos will evolve into a creature quite different to African hippos. She refers to them as Hippopotamus Escobarus. What will they look like thousands of years from now? - Lucy Cooke's latest book is The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-pablo-escobar-hippos Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How overparenting backfired on Americans | Jonathan Haidt | Most Talked About 2018 How overparenting backfired on Americans | Jonathan Haidt | Most Talked About 2018
2 months ago En
This is the most talked about Big Think video of 2018! What's your take? Being raised indoors might the reason young Americans struggle in the adult world. - American childhood is going, going… gone, says Professor Jonathan Haidt. - In the mid-'90s there was a sharp shift to overprotective parenting. In previous generations, kids were allowed to out of the house unsupervised from age 5-8, which has now become age 12-16. As a result, their independence, resilience, and problem-solving skills suffer. - "Give childhood back to kids so that they do what they most need to do, which is develop the skills of being an independent adult. Remember that the job of a parent is to work him or herself out of a job." - As a resource for parents, Jonathan Haidt recommends letgrow.org. Haidt is the author of The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure (https://goo.gl/tRMc2J) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-overparenting-backfired-on-americans Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink American parenting really changed in the 1990s. When I'm talking about the book I go around the country, I ask audiences: At what age were you let out? At what age could you go outside and play with your friends with no adults supervising? And I say, "Only people over 40 what's your answer? Call it out." And it's: "Five, seven, eight, six, five, seven!" It's always five to eight. That's what we always did — between five and eight kids could go outside without an adult. They would get in arguments, they would play games, they would make rules, they were independent; they got years and years of practicing independence. Then I say: "Just people under 25 what year were you let out?" "12, 14, 13, 16!" Nobody says ten or younger. In the 1990s, as the crime rate was plummeting, as American life was getting safer and safer, Americans freaked out and thought that if they take their eyes off their children the children will be abducted. Now this goes back — the fear was stoked by cable TV in the 1980s, there were a few high profile of abductions, but it's not until the 1990s that we really start locking kids up and saying you cannot be outside until you're 14 or 15. We took this essential period of childhood, from about eight to 12, when kids throughout history have practiced independence, have gotten into adventures, have made rafts and floated down the Mississippi River — we took that period and said you don't get to practice independence until it's too late, until that period is over. Now, a couple years before you go to college, now you can go outside. "Okay, go off to college." And a lot of them are not ready. They're just not used to being independent. When they get to college they need more help, they're asking adults for more help. "Protect me from this. Punish him for saying that. Protect me from that book." There's a very sharp change with kids who were born in 1995 and afterwards — surprisingly sharp. Jean Twenge in her book iGen analyzes surveys of behavior of time use and beginning with kids born in 1995, they spend a lot less time going out with friends, they don't get a drivers license as often, they don't drink as much, they don't go out on dates, they don't work for money as much. What are they doing? They're spending a lot more time sitting on their beds with their devices interacting that way. These are the first kids who got social media when they were 13, roughly. They were subjected to much more anti-bullying content in their schools, much more adult supervision, they were raised in the years after 9/11, they were given much less recess and free play with no child left behind, there was much more testing pushed down into earlier grades. We don't know if this is for sure the reason, but they seem to have more difficulty working out problems on their own. The most common thing I hear is that members of Gen Z, if they overhear a joke, if they overhear someone say something, they'll get offended and then they'll go straight to HR, they go straight to somebody to file a complaint, where previous generations would have either just shaken it off or just said "jerk" or "asshole" or whatever. I think there are a couple of things we can say. One is you have to take charge of device use and social media. We don't know for sure but it looks like a two-hour limit per day is probably a good idea; keeping kids off of social media as long as possible is a good idea. It's very hard to do this as one parent when your kid's friends are not limited. So you've got to talk to your kid's friends and all have a common front, all have a common policy then go to the schools. Schools can solve these problems collectively in ways that individual parents cannot.
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Why “I’m not racist” is only half the story | Robin DiAngelo | Most Controversial 2018 Why “I’m not racist” is only half the story | Robin DiAngelo | Most Controversial 2018
2 months ago En
White guilt is a roadblock to equality, says Robin DiAngelo. It takes race conversations off the table and maintains the status quo. - "How do so many of us who are white individually feel so free of racism and yet we live in a society that is so profoundly separate and unequal by race?" asks DiAngelo. - Stop feeling bad—that's not productive. Instead, start doing something to dismantle the systemic racism that benefits you at the expense of others. Dr. Robin DiAngelo is Affiliate Faculty at the University of Washington. She is a two-time winner of the Student's Choice Award for Educator of the Year from the University of Washington’s School of Social Work. Her scholarship is in White Racial Identity and Race Relations. In addition to her academic work, Robin has extensive experience as a workplace consultant in race relations and racial justice. Her book White Fragility: Why It's So Hard For White People To Talk About Racism was released in June and debuted on the New York Times Bestseller list: (https://goo.gl/m5qegD) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/top-10-2018-white-fragility-and-racism-in-america Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink All systems of oppression are highly adaptive, and they can adapt to challenges and incorporate them. They can allow for exceptions. And I think the most effective adaptation of the system of racism to the challenges of the civil rights movement was to reduce a racist to a very simple formula. A racist is an individual — always an individual, not a system — who consciously does not like people based on race — must be conscious — and who intentionally seeks to be mean to them. Individual, conscious, intent. And if that is MY definition of a racist, then your suggestion that anything I've said or done is racist or has a racist impact, I'm going to hear that as: you just said I was a bad person. You just put me over there in that category. And most of my bias anyway is unconscious. So I'm not intending, I'm not aware. So now I'm going to need to defend my moral character, and I will, and we've all seen it. It seems to be virtually impossible based on that definition for the average white person to look deeply at their socialization, to look at the inevitability of internalizing racist biases, developing racist patterns, and having investments in the system of racism — which is pretty comfortable for us and serves us really well. I think that definition of a racist, that either/or, what I call the good/bad binary is the root of virtually all white defensiveness on this topic because it makes it virtually impossible to talk to the average white person about the inevitable absorption of a racist world-view that we get by being literally swimming in racist water. White fragility is meant to capture the defensiveness that so many white people display when our world views, our identities or our racial positions are challenged. And it's a very familiar dynamic. I think there's a reason that term resonated for so many people. I mean even if you yourself are to explain white fragility it's fairly recognizable that in general white people are really defensive when the topic is racism and when they are challenged racially or cross racially. So the fragility part is meant to capture how easy it is to trigger that defensiveness. For many white people the mere suggestion that being white has meaning will set us off. Another thing that will set us off is generalizing about white people. Right now I'm generalizing about white people, and that questions a very precious ideology, which is: most white people are raised to see ourselves as individuals. We don't like being generalized about. And yet social life is patterned and observable and predictable in describable ways. And while we are, of course, all unique individuals, we are also members of social groups. And that membership is profound. That membership matters. We can literally predict whether my mother and I were going to survive my birth and how long I'm going to live based on my race. We need to be willing to grapple with the collective experiences we have as a result of being members of a particular group that has profound meaning for our lives. We live in a society that is deeply separate and unequal by race. I think we all know that. How we would explain why that is might vary, but that it's separate and unequal is very, very clear.
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