Big Think
Smarter Faster™ Big Think is the leading source of expert-driven, actionable, educational content -- with thousands of videos, featuring experts ranging from Bill Clinton to Bill Nye, we help you get smarter, faster. We aim to help you explore the big ideas and core skills that define knowledge in the 21st century, so you can apply them to the questions and challenges in your own life.

1757 videos
Why should you always assume you’re wrong? Science. Why should you always assume you’re wrong? Science.
1 day ago En
When it comes to scientific theory, (or your personal life) be sure to question everything. - The theories we build to navigate the world, both scientifically and in our personal lives, all contain assumptions. They're a critical part of scientific theory. - Cognitive psychologist Donald Hoffman urges us to always question those assumptions. In this way, by challenging ourselves, we come to a deeper understanding of the task at hand. - Historically, humans have come to some of our greatest discoveries by simply questioning assumed information. Donald Hoffman is a professor of cognitive science at the University of California, Irvine. His writing has appeared in Scientific American and Edge, and his work has been featured in the Atlantic, Wired, and Quanta. His latest book is "The Case Against Reality: Why Evolution Hid the Truth From Our Eyes" (http://bit.ly/thecaseagainstreality)
The great hack: A famous fraudster explains the Equifax data breach | Frank Abagnale The great hack: A famous fraudster explains the Equifax data breach | Frank Abagnale
4 days ago En
Political engagement online takes work, too. Here’s why. Political engagement online takes work, too. Here’s why.
4 days ago En
- Groups with more resources, more organizational infrastructure, and more conservatives leanings tend to use the internet for political activism more so than their working class, left-leaning counterparts. - Building a political movement with a strong online component takes a tremendous amount of work and expertise, such as understanding how to leverage algorithms on social media to better propagate a message. - When it comes to sending out a message online to as wide an audience as possible, be mindful to develop ways to not just reach those who have the time and resources to be constantly online. Jen Schradie is a sociologist and Assistant Professor at the Observatoire sociologique du changement at Sciences Po in Paris. Her work has been featured on CNN and the BBC and in the New Yorker, the Washington Post, Time, the Daily Beast, and Buzzfeed, among other media. She was awarded the Public Sociology Alumni Prize at University of California, Berkeley, and has directed six documentary films. She is the author of The Revolution That Wasn't: How Digital Activism Favors Conservatives (https://amzn.to/2J35uY2)
How will AI and robotics transform jobs of the future? | Tony Saldanha How will AI and robotics transform jobs of the future? | Tony Saldanha
6 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Artificial intelligence is already here and it has been taking care of mundane tasks and advising professionals of its findings to help improve service. For instance, doctors refer to A.I.'s findings on x-rays when developing treatment plans for patients. - In Latvia and China, artificial intelligence programs are already handling small claims in courts of law. This helps free up legal experts to focus on cases that transcend routine offenses. - Robotics is changing the manufacturing industry because drones and robots are increasingly capable of handling mundane work, monotonous jobs that many humans might find tiring. Tony Saldanha is a Fortune 25 executive in the Global Business Services (GBS) and Information Technology area. During a 27-year career at Procter & Gamble, Saldanha ran IT and GBS in every region of the world, helping create a multi-billion dollar best-in-class operation. He currently provides advice to boards and CEOs in Fortune 500 companies on digital transformation, especially on internal business operations. He is the author of Why Digital Transformations Fail: The Surprising Disciplines of How to Take Off and Stay Ahead (https://amzn.to/2oMSH5d) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Space capitalism: Is asteroid mining and space colonization legal? | Peter Ward Space capitalism: Is asteroid mining and space colonization legal? | Peter Ward
1 week ago En
The private sector may need the Outer Space Treaty to be updated before it can make any claims to celestial bodies or their resources. - The Outer Space Treaty, which was signed in 1967, is the basis of international space law. Its regulations set out what nations can and cannot do, in terms of colonization and enterprise in space. - One major stipulation of the treaty is that no nation can individually claim or colonize any part of the universe—when the US planted a flag on the Moon in 1969, it took great pains to ensure the world it was symbolic, not an act of claiming territory. - Essentially to do anything in space, as a private enterprise, you have to be able to make money. When it comes to asteroid mining, for instance, it would be "astronomically" expensive to set up such an industry. The only way to get around this would be if the resources being extracted were so rare you could sell them for a fortune on Earth. Peter Ward studied journalism at the University of Sheffield before moving to Dubai, where he reported on the energy sector. After three years in the Middle East, he earned his master’s degree in business journalism from Columbia University Journalism School. His work has appeared in GQ, Bloomberg, The Economist, and Newsweek. He lives in New York City. His latest book is The Consequential Frontier: Challenging the Privatization of Space (https://amzn.to/2VImJD8)
Student of the stars: How do you become an astronomer? | Michelle Thaller Student of the stars: How do you become an astronomer? | Michelle Thaller
1 week ago En
What's the difference between an astronomer and an astrophysicist? - NASA's Michelle Thaller explains that these terms are used interchangeably: both are physicists who study objects and phenomena in the sky. - How can you become an astronomer? There is a defined path to take: Do an undergrad degree in astrophysics, physics, mathematics or computer science, then complete a doctorate in astrophysics. You could also work with astronomers by studying engineering and building telescopes. - In this fascinating explanation of what an astronomer's day-to-day job actually looks like, Thaller shines a light on the unexpected skills you might need and answers the question on every ambitious astronomer-to-be's mind: How will I know what to discover?
Deep learning nails correlation. Causation is another matter. | Gary Marcus Deep learning nails correlation. Causation is another matter. | Gary Marcus
1 week ago En
Why do people with bigger hands have a better vocabulary? That's one question deep learning can't answer. - Did you know that people with bigger hands have larger vocabularies? - While that's actually true, it's not a causal relationship. This pattern exists because adults tend know more words than kids. It's a correlation, explains NYU professor Gary Marcus. - Deep learning struggles with how to perceive causal relationships. If given the data on hand size and vocabulary size, a deep learning system might only be able to see the correlation, but wouldn't be able to answer the 'why?' of it. Dr. Gary Marcus is the director of the NYU Infant Language Learning Center, and a professor of psychology at New York University. He is the author of "The Birth of the Mind," "The Algebraic Mind: Integrating Connectionism and Cognitive Science," and "Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind." Marcus's research on developmental cognitive neuroscience has been published in over forty articles in leading journals, and in 1996 he won the Robert L. Fantz award for new investigators in cognitive development. Marcus contributed an idea to Big Think's "Dangerous Ideas" blog, suggesting that we should develop Google-like chips to implant in our brains and enhance our memory. His latest book is Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust ( https://amzn.to/33zxevr)
Made in the USA | The History of the Integrated Circuit Made in the USA | The History of the Integrated Circuit
1 week ago En
So much of the world you know was made possible by Intel founder Robert Noyce, co-inventor of the integrated circuit. - In this awe-inspiring short documentary, Michael Malone, author of The Intel Trinity, traces the history of Silicon Valley technology, starting with the integrated circuit, invented by Intel co-founder Robert Noyce. - Ever wondered how Moore's Law came about, and who it's named after? Gordon Moore, Intel's other founder and the law's namesake, explains the remarkable growth and improvements to quality of life made possible by the integrated circuit. - With quantum computing on the horizon, there's no telling how technology will change humanity in the next decades. That's a cause for excitement, and trepidation; new technology requires new cautions.
What is free will, really? Steven Pinker explains. What is free will, really? Steven Pinker explains.
1 week ago En
-Free will exists, but by no means is it a miracle. - We use "free will" to describe the more complex processes by which behavior is selected in the brain. These neurological steps taken to make decisions respect all laws of physics. - "Free will wouldn't be worth having or extolling, in moral discussions, if it didn't respond to expectations of reward, punishment, praise, blame," Pinker says. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations. He grew up in Montreal and earned his BA from McGill and his PhD from Harvard. Currently Johnstone Professor of Psychology at Harvard, he has also taught at Stanford and MIT. He has won numerous prizes for his research, his teaching, and his nine books, including The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, The Better Angels of Our Nature, The Sense of Style, and Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress https://amzn.to/2VGM8gK
Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education? | Darrell Bradford Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education? | Darrell Bradford
1 week ago En
- We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success. - On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess. - To improve our education system, we need to understand we currently only have answers to some huge open questions right now. We are still figuring things out on how to enrich different people's lives as they find their positions in the economy — and society at large. This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
How a Nobel Prize winner moves from data to discovery | Jim Allison How a Nobel Prize winner moves from data to discovery | Jim Allison
1 week ago En
How do you develop the next big idea? You pull together people who are both curious and passionate. - In 2018, Dr. Jim Allison was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for discovering an effective way to attack cancer through immunology. - In pursuing this discovery, he recruited other scientists who were curious, who cared about and were committed to science. "You have to put up with a lot of failure, 'cause if you're not, you're probably doing boring stuff," Allison says. - When it comes to developing a theory that works, it's critical to ask as many people as possible on a project for their hypotheses on why a particular outcome may take place. By pulling together these ideas, and testing them, better data can be accumulated. Jim Allison is the subject of Jim Allison: Breakthrough, a documentary narrated by Woody Harrelson that brings filmmakers and scientists together to tell the story of a Nobel Prize-winning cancer discovery that changed the world. In cinemas September 2019.
Surviving Y2K: What did we learn from the biggest tech scare in history? Surviving Y2K: What did we learn from the biggest tech scare in history?
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - In terms of programming, the year 2000 was perhaps the biggest digital change to date across the world. The reason for this is because, in the years before, two digits were allocated to computing related to the year. With 2000, three had to be allocated. - Programmers around the world came together and successfully drove the Y2K conversion. The freedom they were given by politicians, who didn't entirely understand the problem, gave programmers the space they needed to make the changes expediently. - When goals are clearly stated—in this case, December 31, 1999—people understand that there is a deadline on when they have to be done with their work before bad things happen. As a result of the teamwork operating under a clearly stated goal, there were no major catastrophes when the new year rolled in. Tony Saldanha is a Fortune 25 executive in the Global Business Services (GBS) and Information Technology area. During a 27-year career at Procter & Gamble, Saldanha ran IT and GBS in every region of the world, helping create a multi-billion dollar best-in-class operation. He currently provides advice to boards and CEOs in Fortune 500 companies on digital transformation, especially on internal business operations. His latest book is Why Digital Transformations Fail: The Surprising Disciplines of How to Take Off and Stay Ahead (https://amzn.to/2AUHjGL) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How can we best help students? Cultivate their love for learning. | John Hardin How can we best help students? Cultivate their love for learning. | John Hardin
2 weeks ago En
So much has changed since 1893. Why not the education system? - In 1893, a committee of ten leaders in education chaired by Charles Eliot, the president of Harvard University, produced a report that aimed to unify the various education systems and philosophies across America, with the goal of giving the same education to everyone. - That framework is still operating in the U.S. today—but should it be? John Hardin, vice president of Stand Together Ventures, points out that this uniform approach does not take into account the unique interests and skills of each kid. It might even squash children's love of learning, rather than cultivating it. John is the vice president of leadership engagement for Stand Together Ventures. He works with the Ventures community to develop bold partnerships and innovations that accelerate the efforts of Stand Together to help every person realize their full potential. Previously, John was the director of university relations at the Charles Koch Foundation. Before that, he worked in golf course construction, and he was in school for a long time, earning a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from The Citadel, a master’s degree in theological studies from Duke University, and a doctorate in U.S. history from the University of Maryland at College Park. John lives in South Carolina with his wife, Jessica, and their boys, John and Sullivan. This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Sink or swim: How to survive waves of change in a fast-paced industry | Rita McGrath Sink or swim: How to survive waves of change in a fast-paced industry | Rita McGrath
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Here's how to best position yourself for taking advantage of the unexpected. - Why are companies like Apple on top of the world while others like Blackberry have been relegated to a minor market share? Why is Netflix king and Blockbuster extinct? Netflix spotted a strategic inflection point and capitalized on it, says Rita Gunther McGrath. - A strategic inflection point is a shift in the external environment that changes the assumptions upon which a business is based—it could be technology, social norms, or a company's reputation. People and organizations who see inflection points early and respond to them with a small investment or an experiment have an advantage. They will swim while their competitors may sink. Rita Gunther McGrath, a professor at Columbia Business School, is one of the world’s top experts on innovation and growth. She is the best-selling author of The End of Competitive Advantage (Harvard Business Review Press, 2013). Her new book Seeing Around Corners: How to Spot Inflection Points in Business Before They Happen (https://amzn.to/357lJg9) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success | Matt Candler Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success | Matt Candler
2 weeks ago En
Can we radically shift our perception of who should be enacting real change in K-12 education? - The right kind of education reform will happen with people instead of to people. - Part of this requires redefining who the "experts" are in education. It might be beneficial to loosen control on the part of those that train principals and teachers. - If educators can view themselves as hosts to the conversation of what schools could look like, the movement for change becomes more courageous. Matt Candler is founder and board chair of 4.0 Schools. To date, 4.0’s invested in more than 1,000 founders, equipping them to run trials of better ways to teach and learn across the US. Matt’s past gigs include: teacher/coach/principal in public and private schools; HQ Ops and Comms at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics and later at Chicago Public Schools; helping people launch education ventures at LearningNext, KIPP, NYC Charter Center, New Schools for New Orleans. Matt learns best when he's making and breaking things, so he makes electric motorcycles after his kids go to bed. Learn more about that at nightshiftbikes.com.
How academic freedom strengthens the bonds of accumulated knowledge | Nicholas Christakis How academic freedom strengthens the bonds of accumulated knowledge | Nicholas Christakis
2 weeks ago En
As humans, we teach each other. But do we take for granted our freedom to do so? - Humans are unique in that we learn socially and actively teach each other lessons of survival. - Freedom of expression allows accumulated knowledge, that which is passed down through generations and across cultures, to flourish within and benefit society. Nicholas A. Christakis is a physician, sociologist, and director of the Human Nature Lab at Yale University, where he is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society. Follow him on Twitter @NAChristakis The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of Stand Together, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Steven Pinker: Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion Steven Pinker: Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion
2 weeks ago En
- If channels of expression aren't kept open, there runs a risk of pluralistic ignorance. - We all have the right to express ideas even if they're incorrect. How would we know whether an idea is right or wrong without expressing and evaluating it? Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations. He grew up in Montreal and earned his BA from McGill and his PhD from Harvard. Currently Johnstone Professor of Psychology at Harvard, he has also taught at Stanford and MIT. He has won numerous prizes for his research, his teaching, and his nine books, including The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, The Better Angels of Our Nature, The Sense of Style, and Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress (https://amzn.to/2pGndxG). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of Stand Together, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Stand-Together/academic-freedom-from-delusion Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion | Steven Pinker Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion | Steven Pinker
2 weeks ago En
- If channels of expression aren't kept open, there runs a risk of pluralistic ignorance. - We all have the right to express ideas even if they're incorrect. How would we know whether an idea is right or wrong without expressing and evaluating it? Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist who conducts research in visual cognition, psycholinguistics, and social relations. He grew up in Montreal and earned his BA from McGill and his Ph.D. from Harvard. Currently Johnstone Professor of Psychology at Harvard, he has also taught at Stanford and MIT. He has won numerous prizes for his research, his teaching, and his nine books, including The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, The Better Angels of Our Nature, and The Sense of Style. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, a Humanist of the Year, a recipient of nine honorary doctorates, and one of Foreign Policy’s “World’s Top 100 Public Intellectuals” and Time’s “100 Most Influential People in the World Today.” He is Chair of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary, and writes frequently for The New York Times, The Guardian, and other publications. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
What most people get wrong about volunteering through work | Aaron Hurst What most people get wrong about volunteering through work | Aaron Hurst
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How can the music industry inform the system of K-12 education? | John Hardin How can the music industry inform the system of K-12 education? | John Hardin
3 weeks ago En
- The history of the music industry has been one of bundling and un-bundling: Originally, the only place you could hear your favorite song was on the radio, if you were lucky. But then you could buy a single on a 45. Then, individual songs became bundled again on LPs. Then, you could buy them un-bundled through mp3s. - This process of bundling and un-bundling has taken place in many industries and institutions over time. The result is greater choice, more personalization, and a better experience. - But this hasn't really happened in education. Instead, education has been delivered in a one-size-fits all bundle that's not really relevant for every student. How can we fix this? John Hardin is the vice president of leadership engagement for Stand Together Ventures. He works with the Ventures community to develop bold partnerships and innovations that accelerate the efforts of Stand Together to help every person realize their full potential. Previously, John was the director of university relations at the Charles Koch Foundation. Before that, he worked in golf course construction, and he was in school for a long time, earning a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from The Citadel, a master’s degree in theological studies from Duke University, and a doctorate in U.S. history from the University of Maryland at College Park. John lives in South Carolina with his wife, Jessica, and their boys, John and Sullivan. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/yes-every-kid/music-industry-education Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Hormone Hacking: How to engineer your quality of life | Dave Asprey Hormone Hacking: How to engineer your quality of life | Dave Asprey
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Has misinformation clouded our understanding of the anti-aging power of hormones? - Hormone therapy and supplementation have often been associated with cancer and unwanted side effects. - However, this connection is fueled by misinformation and faulty sources of testosterone and estrogen outside the human body. - When taken correctly, bioidentical hormone supplements can dial back the aging process and spark a zest for life while decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in both men and women. Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur, professional biohacker, the New York Times bestselling author of Game Changers, Head Strong and The Bulletproof Diet, the creator of Bulletproof Coffee, and the host of Bulletproof Radio, the Webby Award–winning, number one–ranked podcast. His new book is Super Human he Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever (https://amzn.to/2mGJEl3) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/hormone-hacking Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Blockchain simplified: How it eliminates the middleman | Tony Saldanha Blockchain simplified: How it eliminates the middleman | Tony Saldanha
4 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge What's the big promise of blockchain in business? Its ability to eliminate the middle man. - Blockchain is basically a ledger of people's transactions. It is the underlying programming on top of which the cryptocurrency bitcoin was developed. - Blockchain doesn't allow for people's transactions to be hacked because everyone has access to a record of the values exchanged. Because of this, it is said to be unhackable. - Blockchain has many potential uses, such as in accounting systems. This is already the case in Dubai, where its used for the city's stock exchange, and in the Baltic states, such as Latvia and Lithuania, for their political processes. Tony Saldanha is a Fortune 25 executive in the Global Business Services (GBS) and Information Technology area. During a 27-year career at Procter & Gamble, Saldanha ran IT and GBS in every region of the world, helping create a multi-billion dollar best-in-class operation. He currently provides advice to boards and CEOs in Fortune 500 companies on digital transformation, especially on internal business operations. He is the author of "Why Digital Transformations Fail: The Surprising Disciplines of How to Take Off and Stay Ahead" (https://amzn.to/2ld13l3) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How does stress affect a child’s development and academic potential? | Pamela Cantor How does stress affect a child’s development and academic potential? | Pamela Cantor
1 month ago En
Understanding cognitive development and stress in children can add context to systems of education. - The majority of growth of the human brain happens after birth. - While unrelenting stress can damage developing structures of the limbic system, calibrated challenge can positively stimulate brain growth. Teachers have an important role in assuring students of their safety when taking on new challenges. Pamela Cantor, M.D. practiced child psychiatry for nearly two decades, specializing in trauma. She founded Turnaround for Children after co-authoring a study on the impact of the 9/11 attacks on New York City schoolchildren. She is a Visiting Scholar in Education at Harvard University and a leader of the Science of Learning and Development Alliance. This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
You should be skeptical when it comes to hyped-up AI. Here’s why | Gary Marcus You should be skeptical when it comes to hyped-up AI. Here’s why | Gary Marcus
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge These questions can help us think more critically about new developments in artificial intelligence. - The media often exaggerate and overhype the latest discoveries in artificial intelligence. - It's important to add context to new findings by asking questions: Is there a demo available? How narrow was the task the computer performed? - A more robust approach to artificial intelligence involves solving problems in generalized situations rather than just laboratory demonstrations. Dr. Gary Marcus is the director of the NYU Infant Language Learning Center, and a professor of psychology at New York University. He is the author of "The Birth of the Mind," "The Algebraic Mind: Integrating Connectionism and Cognitive Science," and "Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind." Marcus's research on developmental cognitive neuroscience has been published in over forty articles in leading journals, and in 1996 he won the Robert L. Fantz award for new investigators in cognitive development. Marcus contributed an idea to Big Think's "Dangerous Ideas" blog, suggesting that we should develop Google-like chips to implant in our brains and enhance our memory. His latest book is "Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust" (https://amzn.to/2kpujnY) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Without academic freedom, we might never see the truth. Here’s why. | Nicholas Christakis Without academic freedom, we might never see the truth. Here’s why. | Nicholas Christakis
1 month ago En
Sometimes, academic expression can make people uncomfortable. But this tension is a feature, not a bug. - The way we communicate is dictated in part by the setting that that communication takes place in. You're supposed to tell your doctor everything; on the other hand, you wouldn't tell your business competitor much at all. - In academia, communication is supposed to be somewhat provocative. The reaction to a provocative idea can't be to silence the one expressing it, but to approach it from the other side of the argument. One way to think about this is that if you don't understand the other side of an issue, then you can't claim to understand the issue. Nicholas A. Christakis is a physician, sociologist, and director of the Human Nature Lab at Yale University, where he is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society (https://amzn.to/2lVmve9). Follow him on Twitter @NAChristakis The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How can cognitive science inform the future of education? | Lindsay Portnoy How can cognitive science inform the future of education? | Lindsay Portnoy
1 month ago En
The science of learning is decades ahead of the education system. How can we bring education into the present? - The education field has a wealth of cognitive science research that reveals how people learn, yet the applied practice happening is schools shows an enormous disconnect. - Things like school bells, siloed 'one-hour-one-subject' classes, traditional grades, and standardized testing are outdated design features of the education system. - Equitably educating all learners across diverse populations to help them be as successful as possible will require education innovators to put cognitive science to work in the field, and to re-educate policymakers on what school could look like. Lindsay Portnoy, PhD, is a cognitive scientist working to translate research-based practices in teaching and learning to improve curriculum, assessment, and the intentional integration of emerging practices and tools to support all learners. A former public school teacher, Portnoy has spent nearly two decades working in preK–12, higher ed, and informal educational settings. She is an Associate Teaching Professor at Northeastern University’s Graduate School of Education and is cofounder and chief learning officer at Killer Snails. This video is supported by "yes. every kid.", an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
The hackable technology that worries even a legendary con man | Frank W. Abagnale The hackable technology that worries even a legendary con man | Frank W. Abagnale
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Before we release new technology into the ether, we need to make safeguards so that bad actors can't misuse them. - Right now cybercrime is basically a financial crime — it's a business of stealing people's money or stealing their data. Data has value. - We develop a lot of technology — we need to always ask the question how the new innovation can be misused and make safeguards so that it cannot be done. - Because we currently don't do these things, we have hackable vehicles, pacemakers, and laptops. Frank W. Abagnale is one of the world's most respected authorities on the subjects of forgery, embezzlement and secure documents. Mr. Abagnale has been associated with the FBI for over four decades. He lectures extensively at the FBI Academy and for the field offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He is a faculty member at the National Advocacy Center (NAC) which is operated by the Department of Justice, Executive Office for United States Attorneys. More than 14,000 financial institutions, corporations and law enforcement agencies use his fraud prevention programs. His latest book is Scam Me If You Can: Simple Strategies to Outsmart Today's Rip-off Artists (https://amzn.to/2lYowGn) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Truth vs Reality: How we evolved to survive, not to see what’s really there | Donald Hoffman Truth vs Reality: How we evolved to survive, not to see what’s really there | Donald Hoffman
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Take the circumstances in your life seriously, but not literally. Here's why. - Galileo was quite controversial, in part, because he argued that Earth moved around the sun, despite people's senses deluding them that the world was static. - Evolution may have primed us to see the world in terms of payoffs rather than absolute reality — this has actually helped us survive. Those who win payoffs are more likely to pass on their genes, which encode these strategies to get to the "next level" of life. - It's important to listen to people's objections because they may bring something to your attention outside your ken. Learn from them to make your ideas sharper. Donald Hoffman is professor of cognitive science at the University of California, Irvine. His writing has appeared in Scientific American and Edge, and his work has been featured in the Atlantic, Wired, and Quanta. He resides in Irvine, California. His latest book is "The Case Against Reality: Why Evolution Hid the Truth from Our Eyes" https://amzn.to/2lAuCMS If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/donald-hoffman-reality Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
AI: Our New Best Friend | Intel's Lama Nachman AI: Our New Best Friend | Intel's Lama Nachman
1 month ago En
The fourth wave of the Industrial Revolution is here. If change is led by the right people, we will have ethical machines, says Intel's Lama Nachman. - We're entering the fourth wave of the Industrial Revolution, says Genevieve Bell, cultural anthropologist and fellow at Intel. You can chart humanity's progress through four disruptive stages: Steam engine, electricity, computers, and now AI. - AI is already all around us, but what will it look like at scale? What will life be like when "suddenly all the objects around us are capable of action without us directing them?" asks Bell. Will fully scaled AI be a boon or an existential threat to humanity? - Speaking at The Nantucket Project, Lama Nachman, director of Intel's Anticipator Computing Lab, affirms her optimism. "My belief is that, really, ethical people and ethical researchers are the ones who are going to build ethical machines." Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Intel-The-Nantucket-Project/your-new-best-friend Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Machines probably aren’t interested in global takeover. Here’s why. | Gary Marcus Machines probably aren’t interested in global takeover. Here’s why. | Gary Marcus
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge What most people worry about when it comes to artificial intelligence likely comes from science-fiction fantasy. - When someone says they fear artificial intelligence, what are they imagining? Robots taking over the world is the stuff of science-fiction fantasy. - Despite decades of beating humans at the game of Go, AI has never developed the desire to take over actual territory. The reality is that machines are not resourceful and have no interest in us. - Although AI plays an increasingly important role in our lives, we have a ways to go before deep learning and machines are solving all of our problems. Dr. Gary Marcus is the director of the NYU Infant Language Learning Center, and a professor of psychology at New York University. He is the author of "The Birth of the Mind," "The Algebraic Mind: Integrating Connectionism and Cognitive Science," and "Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind." Marcus's research on developmental cognitive neuroscience has been published in over forty articles in leading journals, and in 1996 he won the Robert L. Fantz award for new investigators in cognitive development. Marcus contributed an idea to Big Think's "Dangerous Ideas" blog, suggesting that we should develop Google-like chips to implant in our brains and enhance our memory. His latest book is Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust (https://amzn.to/2lO5NgK) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Academic freedom: What it is, what it isn’t and why there’s confusion | Robert Quinn Academic freedom: What it is, what it isn’t and why there’s confusion | Robert Quinn
1 month ago En
Academics are often attacked for having the audacity to pursue their research wherever it leads. But engaging with difficult, challenging ideas is a large part of what academia is about. - Academic expression is neither free expression nor political, though it is connected to both. Because of this misunderstanding, academic expression is often attacked, not because of the quality of scholars' ideas, but because of scholars' audacity in sharing them. - The Scholars at Risk network is working to ensure that academics of all stripes have the academic freedom they need to pursue their work. - In this video, Robert Quinn stresses that this is not a left/right issue, nor is it something that's only happening halfway across the world, and he explains why it's so important to defend academic freedom. Robert Quinn is a human rights advocate, lawyer, lecturer, writer and founding executive director of Scholars at Risk, an international network of more than 500 higher education institutions and thousands of individuals in 39 countries dedicated to protecting at-risk scholars, promoting academic freedom, and defending everyone’s freedom to think, question and share ideas. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/academic-freedom Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
If America’s education system is outdated, how can we evolve? | Derrell Bradford If America’s education system is outdated, how can we evolve? | Derrell Bradford
1 month ago En
Specialization in education is just one way of optimizing the system for the future. - The current education system wasn't designed to accommodate the dynamism required today. - Derrell Bradford of 50CAN points out that, while education reform in the past has done some great things for many students in America, there is a definite need to evolve. That evolution involves maintaining the positive aspects of the education system and overcoming the negative. - This video is supported by yes. every kid. (https://yeseverykid.com), an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform. Derrell is the executive vice president of 50CAN where he advocates to improve educational opportunities and options for families across the country. Derrell also recruits and trains local leaders across the 50CAN network and leads the network’s National Voices fellowship; a seminar focused on education policy, political collaboration, and media. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/yes-every-kid/education-reform Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Michio Kaku: Feedback loops are creating consciousness Michio Kaku: Feedback loops are creating consciousness
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Our ability to make predictions about the future distinguishes our level of consciousness. - One of the great questions in all of science is where consciousness comes from. - When it comes to consciousness, Kaku believes different species have different levels of consciousness, based on their feedback loops needed to survive in space, society, and time. - According to the theoretical physicist, human beings' ability to use past experiences, memories, to predict the future makes us distinct among animals — and even robots (they're currently unable to understand, or operate within, a social hierarchy). Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). He is the author of "The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth" (https://amzn.to/2lQyjy4) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/what-is-consciousness-michio-kaku Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How less professionalism will get you ahead in the workplace of the future | Aaron Hurst How less professionalism will get you ahead in the workplace of the future | Aaron Hurst
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge When it comes to job security in the future, instead of acting "professional" you may want to act more human. - Dell and the Institute for the Future recently conducted a study that found 85 percent of the jobs in 2030 don't exist today. - Having the conversation with kids on what they want to be when they grow up is becoming increasingly irrelevant because of this. They will need to be more adaptable for what future jobs may arise. - We commonly describe a "professional" as someone who can do the same thing multiple times with the same result. However, where A.I. is most effective is in producing the same output via consistent, repeatable activity. Because of this, it's being as "unprofessional" as possible that may secure a job — that is, acting in a way that is not predictable. Acting on your humanity may enable you to thrive. Aaron Hurst is a globally recognized entrepreneur who works to create communities that are empowered to realize their potential. He is the CEO of Imperative, a B Corp advocating for Purpose-Oriented Workers and supporting the organizations that embrace them. Hurst is the author of The Purpose Economy (2014) and a regular advisor and thought partner for many global brands. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/workplace-of-the-future Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
The biggest problem in AI? Machines have no common sense. | Gary Marcus The biggest problem in AI? Machines have no common sense. | Gary Marcus
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Correlation doesn't equal causation — we all know this. Well, except robots. - There are a lot of people in the tech world who think that if we collect as much data as much, and run a lot of statistics, that we will be able to develop robots where artificial "intelligence" organically emerges. - However, many A.I.'s that currently exist aren't close to being "intelligent," it's difficult to even program common sense into them. The reason for this is because correlation doesn't always equal causation — robots that operate on correlation alone may have skewed algorithms in which to operate in the real world. - When it comes to performing simple tasks, such as opening a door, we currently don't know how to encode that information — the varied process that is sometimes required in differing situations, i.e. jiggling the key, turning the key just right — into a language that a computer can understand. Dr. Gary Marcus is the director of the NYU Infant Language Learning Center, and a professor of psychology at New York University. He is the author of "The Birth of the Mind," "The Algebraic Mind: Integrating Connectionism and Cognitive Science," and "Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind." Marcus's research on developmental cognitive neuroscience has been published in over forty articles in leading journals, and in 1996 he won the Robert L. Fantz award for new investigators in cognitive development. Marcus contributed an idea to Big Think's "Dangerous Ideas" blog, suggesting that we should develop Google-like chips to implant in our brains and enhance our memory. His latest book is Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust (https://amzn.to/2kCk8wn) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/machines-have-no-common-sense- Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Revolutionary K-12 education might look like a creative incubator | Catherine Fraise Revolutionary K-12 education might look like a creative incubator | Catherine Fraise
1 month ago En
- As America's mainstream education systems continue to disappoint both parents and students, schooling alternatives present a fresh opportunity and revolutionary approach to teaching children. - Collaborative learning communities help students to discover themselves and their passions while parents play an active role in their education. Inspired by Montessori, Catherine Fraise founded Workspace to provide children the opportunity to learn and grow outside the four walls of "school." - This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform. Catherine Fraise is passionate about creating learning environments where children thrive. She created Workspace Education as a low-cost prototype of a new educational model. Imagine going to school in a Google-like environment and creating your best.life.ever. Families create custom personalized pathways for their children, choosing from the universe of learning opportunities available globally, assisted by a professional education team. Workspace has in-house educators and parents can bring in their own educators also and participate in the creation of engaging learning experiences. Workspace is a coworking/colearning space that allows families to maximize their family time and fulfillment, as well as provide a truly customized education to fit the needs of every child. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How to outsmart a scam: Strategies from legendary con man Frank W. Abagnale How to outsmart a scam: Strategies from legendary con man Frank W. Abagnale
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Frank W. Abagnale says scammers don't discriminate — here's what you can do to protect yourself. - In today's world, anyone can be targeted by scams -- even famous con man Frank W. Abagnale. For this reason he shares his top advice for protecting yourself against fraud. - When receiving a suspicious call, be aware of the two major red flags of immediacy and info-sharing. Is the person asking for money, and they need it right now? Does the person want sensitive personal information like a social security number or date of birth? If the answer to either of those questions is yes, it's probably a scam. - Scammers obtain much of their info from a victim's social media accounts. Caution is key for prevention, and education is the most powerful tool in outsmarting this type of crime. Frank W. Abagnale is one of the world's most respected authorities on the subjects of forgery, embezzlement and secure documents. Mr. Abagnale has been associated with the FBI for over four decades. He lectures extensively at the FBI Academy and for the field offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He is a faculty member at the National Advocacy Center (NAC) which is operated by the Department of Justice, Executive Office for United States Attorneys. More than 14,000 financial institutions, corporations and law enforcement agencies use his fraud prevention programs. He is the author of "Scam Me If You Can: Simple Strategies to Outsmart Today's Rip-off Artists" (https://amzn.to/2lYowGn) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/outsmart-a-scam Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Silicon Valley wants to be a meritocracy. Here’s why it’s not. | Margret O'Mara Silicon Valley wants to be a meritocracy. Here’s why it’s not. | Margret O'Mara
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're a great engineer, you can get ahead in Silicon Valley — to a certain extent. - Silicon Valley prides itself on rewarding good engineers, regardless of gender or race. But that may not actually reflect reality. - The Valley started out as a Mad Men-esque place, where women in particular were excluded. That culture still persists in the form of venture capitalists funding many of today's startups. - Furthermore, many in Silicon Valley fail to acknowledge how becoming a startup founder is often restricted to certain groups of people and how more diversity can ultimately result in a better product or service. Margaret O’Mara is the author of "The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America." (https://amzn.to/2m26zH7) She is a professor of history at the University of Washington, where she writes and teaches about the history of U.S. politics, the growth of the high-tech economy, and the connections between the two. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/silicon-valley-meritocracy Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
What NASA can teach us about education reform | Matt Candler What NASA can teach us about education reform | Matt Candler
1 month ago En
If teachers weren't taught to fear failure, could they see greater success in the mission of education? - Founder of 4.0 Schools, Matt Candler, questions why school has stayed overwhelmingly the same the past 100 years. As a teacher, he sees the future of schools embracing mutual curiosity in both students and educators. - He points to the example of NASA scientists, who approach missions with the idea that failure is welcome and necessary. Failure during preparation ensures the mission will succeed when the time comes to perform. - Candler suggests that this idea should hold up in discussions of education reform and how teachers are trained in their approach to learning. Read more here: https://bigthink.com/yes-every-kid/creative-education-reform Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Create your breakout moment: Take risks to get the job you really want | Sally Susman Create your breakout moment: Take risks to get the job you really want | Sally Susman
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge By putting yourself out there and overcoming anxieties, you just might land your dream job. - When it comes to advancing your career, taking those first steps can be intimidating. Making a big move often incites anxiety and fear surrounding imperfection. - Sally Susman, Executive Vice President and Chief Corporate Affairs Officer at Pfizer, reminds that the pursuit of perfection can be the enemy of taking that next step. She urges us to express ambition and embrace rejection, which should be considered a temporary setback — not a death sentence. - Go for the bold move, whether that means moving to a new city or entering a new field. Taking the risk could lead to your breakout moment in your career. Sally Susman is Executive Vice President and Chief Corporate Affairs Officer at Pfizer. She directs Pfizer's global communications and public affairs activities, as well as heads the firm's corporate responsibility group. Earlier in her career, she spent eight years in government service focused on international trade issues. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/get-your-dream-job Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
If reality is a data structure, can the simulation theory hold up? | Donald Hoffman If reality is a data structure, can the simulation theory hold up? | Donald Hoffman
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Exploring the idea that objects we perceive in everyday life do not reflect objective reality. - Professor of cognitive science Donald Hoffman presents his theory that the world we perceive is a virtual reality. Hoffman has tested this theory by running successful computer simulations that suggest there is no objective reality. - When it comes to Nick Bostrom's simulation theory, Hoffman agrees with parts and disagrees with others. Hoffman argues that, while space time and physical objects do not correspond with objective reality, conscious experiences like the smell of garlic and the feel of velvet cannot be produced by the simulation. - "You can't start with unconscious ingredients and boot up consciousness," Hoffman says. Hoffman is professor of cognitive science at the University of California, Irvine. His writing has appeared in Scientific American and Edge, and his work has been featured in the Atlantic, Wired, and Quanta. He resides in Irvine, California. His latets book is "The Case Against Reality: Why Evolution Hid the Truth from Our Eyes" (https://amzn.to/2lAuCMS) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/virtual-reality Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
What creates a mass shooter? It might be the conditioning of men. | Michael Kaufman What creates a mass shooter? It might be the conditioning of men. | Michael Kaufman
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge When you combine feelings of resentment with the societal praise of leaving one's mark, it forms a lethal cocktail. The common characteristic of mass shootings in America is that they are being perpetrated by men. Masculinity, in the modern day, still entails that men fight and act on their aggressive impulses. When men, who are taught to "leave their mark," experience isolation and loneliness, they often leave their stamp on horrendous atrocities. Michael Kaufman, PhD, is the co-founder of the White Ribbon Campaign, the largest effort in the world of men working to end violence against women. As a writer and speaker, he has worked across America and in almost 50 countries, including extensively with the United Nations, numerous governments, NGOs, and businesses. He is the author or editor of eight books on gender issues, on democracy and development studies, including The Guy's Guide to Feminism, Theorizing Masculinities, and most recently, The Time Has Come: Why Men Must Join the Gender Equality Revolution. https://amzn.to/2lC2sRF If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
What happens to your digital life after you die? | BJ Miller What happens to your digital life after you die? | BJ Miller
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge How to deal with death in the digital age and save your loved ones from headache - Death brings new challenges as we must consider the likelihood that our digital presence will outlive us. Whether it's through social media or an online bank account, the majority of people lead a digital life that they'll leave behind. - BJ Miller, assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, suggests preparing to close out your digital life with steps like itemizing digital accounts and passwords. - Miller also recommends including a spouse on any credit card accounts. These precautions will save loved ones major time and headache after you're gone. BJ Miller, MD, is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco where he practices and teaches palliative medicine. He has been profiled in The New York Times Magazine, and interviewed on Super Soul Sunday, The Tim Ferriss Show, and On Being with Krista Tippett, and has spoken at the Aspen Ideas Festival and around the world. He is the author of "A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death" (https://amzn.to/2zIHVyZ) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Have conservative groups mastered the art of internet activism? | Jen Schradie Have conservative groups mastered the art of internet activism? | Jen Schradie
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Left-leaning groups don't seem to have made as full use of the internet as right-leaning ones. As one conservative put it, Paul Revere had a horse, but they have the internet. - Initially, people saw the internet as a tool for driving more participatory, pluralistic, and personal discussions, especially around politics. - However, with the exception of major movements like Occupy Wall Street, left-leaning groups haven't made as much use of the internet as right-leaning ones. In her research, Jen Schradie found that liberals see the internet as one tool of many to advocate for fairness; the trouble is, the idea of "fairness" brings together many disparate groups, making it difficult to present an organized, unified front, especially online. - Conservatives see the internet as a vehicle for freedom — freedom from the state, free markets, and freedom of information. Conservatives made the internet their platform, where they could organize and discuss issues that they didn't believe were being represented in the media. Jen Schradie is a sociologist and Assistant Professor at the Observatoire sociologique du changement at Sciences Po in Paris. Her work has been featured on CNN and the BBC and in the New Yorker, the Washington Post, Time, the Daily Beast, and Buzzfeed, among other media. She was awarded the Public Sociology Alumni Prize at University of California, Berkeley, and has directed six documentary films. She is the author of The Revolution That Wasn't: How Digital Activism Favors Conservatives (https://amzn.to/2LeCcWV) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Why employees have the upper hand now more than ever before | Aaron Hurst Why employees have the upper hand now more than ever before | Aaron Hurst
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Today, if a business wants to be successful, it should pay attention to employee fulfillment. - Employee satisfaction, as a concept, didn't emerge until the rise of the industrial economy and unionization. If employees were unhappy, management could predict a strike and stoppage of work. - Since then, the standard for management has been to consider employee engagement an accurate measure of satisfaction. Instead, research suggests the focus should be employee fulfillment: Do employees have the ability to reflect on and create meaning around their work? - Now, in the information economy, employees are often the means of value creation. This provides a unique advantage in which management must consider employee fulfillment in order to remain profitable. Aaron Hurst is a globally recognized entrepreneur who works to create communities that are empowered to realize their potential. He is the CEO of Imperative, a B Corp advocating for Purpose-Oriented Workers and supporting the organizations that embrace them. Hurst is the author of The Purpose Economy (2014) and a regular advisor and thought partner for many global brands. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
The top 4 crises facing the world today The top 4 crises facing the world today
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If we make the right choices, there's hope for the future. - According to historian Jared Diamond, we currently have four global crises to address: the ongoing threat of nuclear attacks, climate change, running out of resources, and socioeconomic inequality. - Diamond believes there's hope for the future, though, because these problems are human caused, and must have human solutions — they are not looming doomsdays like an asteroid poised to strike Earth (of which we are currently largely helpless to address). - If we don't aim to solve these issues within the next 30 years, then we — and our children — may end up living in a "miserable world not worth living [in]." Jared Diamond, a noted polymath, is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among his many awards are the U.S. National Medal of Science, Japan's Cosmos Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of the international best-selling books Guns, Germs, and Steel; Collapse; Why Is Sex Fun?; The World Until Yesterday; and The Third Chimpanzee, and is the presenter of TV documentary series based on three of those books. His latest boo is Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis (https://amzn.to/2Uaj00E) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/jared-diamond-crises Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Upward mobility requires education. Here’s how America falls short. Upward mobility requires education. Here’s how America falls short.
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge America's educational system has become frayed by lackluster civic engagement. - One credible way to help children born into poverty get out of it is by providing them with a great education. Indeed, the best, high-paying jobs are going to go to the nations with the best-education people. - On top of helping solve socio-economic inequality, a quality education also promotes a civically-minded, knowledgable citizenry. - Education has become a partisan issue — it should be the opposite. It's also become frayed by lackluster civic engagement. Arne Duncan was one of the longest-serving members of President Barack Obama’s cabinet and among the most influential Secretaries of Education in history. He is now a managing partner with the Emerson Collective. How Schools Work: An Inside Account of Failure and Success from One of the Nation's Longest-Serving Secretaries of Education https://amzn.to/2HpdL88 If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/arne-duncan-social-mobility Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How to vastly improve your problem-solving workshops | Dan Seewald How to vastly improve your problem-solving workshops | Dan Seewald
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge To reach a breakthrough solution to any problem, it's necessary to first understand the underlying causes. - Companies often jump right into workshopping solutions to a problem before they truly understand the underlying source and "pain points" of the issue. - Deliberate Innovation CEO, Dan Seewald, advises companies to visualize and map out those unmet needs in order to discover a new path to a fresh solution. Only then should you move onto brainstorming and ideation techniques. - These important steps allow for more meaningful experimentation, as well as greater opportunity for learning and breakthroughs. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-to-solve-problems Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Space is dead: A challenge to the standard model of quantum mechanics | Lee Smolin Space is dead: A challenge to the standard model of quantum mechanics | Lee Smolin
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Since the idea of locality is dead, space itself may not be an aloof vacuum: Something welds things together, even at great distances. - Realists believe that there is an exactly understandable way the world is — one that describes processes independent of our intervention. Anti-realists, however, believe realism is too ambitious — too hard. They believe we pragmatically describe our interactions with nature — not truths that are independent of us. - In nature, properties of Particle B may be depend on what we choose to measure or manipulate with Particle A, even at great distances. - In quantum mechanics, there is no explanation for this. "It just comes out that way," says Smolin. Realists struggle with this because it would imply certain things can travel faster than light, which still seems improbable. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/lee-smolin-space Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
How Pete Holmes creates comedic flow: Try micro-visualization How Pete Holmes creates comedic flow: Try micro-visualization
2 months ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Setting a simple intention and coming prepared can help you — and those around you — win big. - Setting an intention doesn't have to be complicated, and it can make a great difference when you're hoping for a specific outcome. - When comedian Pete Holmes is preparing to record an episode of his podcast, "You Made it Weird with Pete Holmes," he takes 15 seconds to check in with himself. This way, he's primed with his own material and can help guests feel safe and comfortable to share theirs, as well. - Taking time to visualize your goal for whatever you've set out to do can help you, your colleagues, and your projects succeed. Pete Holmes is a comedian, writer, cartoonist, "Christ-leaning spiritual seeker", and podcast host. His wildly popular podcast, You Made It Weird, is a comedic exploration of the meaning of life with guests ranging from Deepak Chopra and Elizabeth Gilbert to Seth Rogen and Garry Shandling. He is the author of "Comedy Sex God" https://amzn.to/2Zktiw4 If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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