Big Think
Big Think is the leading source of expert-driven, actionable, educational content -- with thousands of videos, featuring experts ranging from Bill Clinton to Bill Nye, we help you get smarter, faster. We aim to help you explore the big ideas and core skills that define knowledge in the 21st century, so you can apply them to the questions and challenges in your own life.

1640 videos
Lateral thinking: The reason you’ve heard of Nintendo and Marvel | David Epstein Lateral thinking: The reason you’ve heard of Nintendo and Marvel | David Epstein
1 day ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Since the explosion of the knowledge economy in the 1990s, generalist inventors have been making larger and more important contributions than specialists. - One theory is that the rise of rapid communication technologies allowed the information created by specialists to be rapidly disseminated, meaning generalists can combine information across disciplines to invent something new. - Here, David Epstein explains how Nintendo's Game Boy was a case of "lateral thinking with withered technology." He also relays the findings of a fascinating study that found the common factor of success among comic book authors. David Epstein is the author of the New York Times bestseller The Sports Gene. He has masters degrees in environmental science and journalism and has worked as an investigative reporter for ProPublica and as a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. His latest book is Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World (https://amzn.to/2Xy5Afz) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Louis C.K., #MeToo, and accountability: Why binary thinking doesn't help | Pete Holmes Louis C.K., #MeToo, and accountability: Why binary thinking doesn't help | Pete Holmes
2 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge We may not learn and grow beyond the #MeToo era if we keep thinking in black and white, says comedian Pete Holmes. - The collective suffering society is going through with the #MeToo movement is the earmark that real change is happening, says comedian Pete Holmes. Abusers need to acknowledge their wrongdoing and, where possible, be open about their evolution and growth. - Comedian Louis C.K.'s abuses and return to the stage have divided the comedy community and society on a broader scale. The debate predominately has two narratives: Either C.K. is a monster, or he is a symbol of artistic freedom. - The truth, says Holmes, is likely in the middle, and our need to take a binary stance won't help us confront and grow from these complicated issues. Pete Holmes is a comedian, writer, cartoonist, "Christ-leaning spiritual seeker", and podcast host. His wildly popular podcast, You Made It Weird, is a comedic exploration of the meaning of life with guests ranging from Deepak Chopra and Elizabeth Gilbert to Seth Rogen and Garry Shandling. He is the author of Comedy Sex God (https://amzn.to/2HoF7dB) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/louis-c-k-metoo-and-accountability-why-binary-thinking-doesnt-help Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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‘Civility’ is a loaded word, and we need it more than ever | Eli Pariser ‘Civility’ is a loaded word, and we need it more than ever | Eli Pariser
3 days ago En
Eli Pariser explains why we can't just think of civility as being polite to one another. - Often, disenfranchised groups are seen as acting uncivil when they protest their conditions, such as the civil rights movement, the #metoo movement, and others. - In this way, the word 'civility' can be subverted to refer to maintaining the status quo. Instead, we should reframe our idea of civility as a respect for human dignity, rather than mere politeness. Eli Pariser has dedicated his career to figuring out how technology can elevate important topics in the world. He is the co-founder of Upworthy and bestselling author of The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You (https://amzn.to/2MLjryg) *The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/civil-discourse Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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What’s wrong with the internet? We’d rather “display” than communicate. | Jonathan Rauch What’s wrong with the internet? We’d rather “display” than communicate. | Jonathan Rauch
4 days ago En
Jonathan Rauch explains why the internet is so hostile to the truth, and what we can do to change that. - Disruptive technologies tend to regress humanity back to our default mode: deeply ingrained tribalism. - Rather than using the internet to communicate, many people use it to display their colors or group affinity, like tribespeople wearing face paint. Fake news spreads faster than truth in these tribal environments. - How can we solve this problem without censorship? Platforms like Facebook and Google are tilting the playing field to be more pro-truth by asking people to stop, think, and take responsibility. Jonathan Rauch is the author of six books and many articles on public policy, culture, and government. He is a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, a contributing editor of The Atlantic, and recipient of the 2005 National Magazine Award. He is the author of "Government's End: Why Washington Stopped Working" https://amzn.to/2KerGAK Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/whats-wrong-with-the-internet-wed-rather-display-than-communicate If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Is nationalism ever a force for good? | Jared Diamond Is nationalism ever a force for good? | Jared Diamond
5 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge! Subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Nationalism isn't always a bad thing. When a country doesn't have self-confidence, and a collective sense of identity, that is also a problem. - The optimal situation, in the case of nationalism, is that a nation's citizens have a healthy amount of it. For instance, as Jared Diamond points out in this video, Finland seems to have a nationalism based in reality — and largely founded on their unique language. It imbues them with an innate pride but doesn't compel them to conquer the world. Also, nationalism that is used to be inclusive, rather than exclusive, can help a nation transcend its darkest moments. Jared Diamond, a noted polymath, is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among his many awards are the U.S. National Medal of Science, Japan's Cosmos Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of the international best-selling books Guns, Germs, and Steel; Collapse; Why Is Sex Fun?; The World Until Yesterday; and The Third Chimpanzee, and is the presenter of TV documentary series based on three of those books. He is the author of "Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis" (http://bit.ly/jardiamond) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/nationalism-2638773344 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How toxic people wage emotional warfare on others | Bill Eddy How toxic people wage emotional warfare on others | Bill Eddy
6 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge! Subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Expect emotional warfare where there are high-conflict people. - High-conflict emotional warfare exists everywhere there are high-conflict people. - Their strategy is usually to seduce someone get other people to agree with them on attacking someone else. In mental health terms, this is called "splitting," where you split people into all good and all bad. Splitting is linked to borderline and narcissistic personality disorders. - High-conflict people dominate by sowing division, at all levels of society — from school boards to state governments. Bill Eddy is the co-founder and president of the High Conflict Institute, a company devoted to helping individuals and organizations deal with high-conflict people. Eddy is a Certified Family Law Specialist and Senior Family Mediator at the National Conflict Resolution Center in San Diego. He is also a Licensed Clinical Social worker with twelve years' experience providing therapy to children, adults, couples and families in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient clinics. His latest book is "Why We Elect Narcissists and Sociopaths―and How We Can Stop" (https://amzn.to/2vpWKUH) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-toxic-people-wage-emotional-warfare-on-others Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Mind-altering drugs: The magical history of LSD and mushrooms | Michael Pollan Mind-altering drugs: The magical history of LSD and mushrooms | Michael Pollan
6 days ago En
Why did government officials stop psychedelics from reaching mainstream culture? - In the '60s drugs escape the lab and become a very important ingredient In the creation of the counterculture. Timothy Leary, a psychologist at Harvard in 1960, has something to do with this. - In Cambridge, he starts the Harvard Psilocybin Project which focuses its research into learning more about this promising drug. Because of its medicinal properties, and apparent positive effect on mental health, Leary believed that everyone should use acid, or psilocybin. - Richard Nixon called Leary the most dangerous man in America. He felt that LSD and other drugs were sapping the will of American boys to fight in Vietnam. For the past twenty-five years, Michael Pollan has been writing books and articles about the places where nature and culture intersect: on our plates, in our farms and gardens, and in the built environment. His latest is How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence - https://amzn.to/2R1PJn4 He is the author four New York Times bestsellers: Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual (2010); In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto (2008); The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006) and The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World (2001). The Omnivore’s Dilemma was named one of the ten best books of 2006 by both the New York Times and the Washington Post. It also won the California Book Award, the Northern California Book Award, the James Beard Award, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. A young readers edition called The Omnivore’s Dilemma: the Secrets Behind What You Eat was published in 2009. The Botany of Desire received the Borders Original Voices Award for the best non-fiction work of 2001, and was recognized as a best book of the year by the American Booksellers Association and Amazon.com. PBS premiered a two-hour special documentary based on The Botany of Desire in fall 2009. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/mind-altering-drugs-the-magical-history-of-lsd-and-mushrooms Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why are IQ scores rising? Industrialization rewired our minds. | David Epstein Why are IQ scores rising? Industrialization rewired our minds. | David Epstein
1 week ago En
If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ 300 years of industrialization have boosted our IQ scores in one very specific way. - Human intelligence is increasing by approximately 3 IQ points per decade, a phenomenon known as the Flynn effect. - The increases come from one area of intelligence in particular: abstract thinking, which can be tested using puzzles like Raven's Progressive Matrices. Watch this video to see two kinds of puzzles: One your modern mind is perfectly geared for, and another that might just fool you. - In this video, David Epstein recounts a natural experiment in the Soviet Union in the 1930s that tested the intelligence of isolated subsistence farmers compared to people who had been exposed to industrialization. The experiment revealed fascinating information about abstract thinking, intelligence transfer, and how modern life has changed the way we perceive the world. David Epstein is the author of the New York Times bestseller The Sports Gene. He has masters degrees in environmental science and journalism and has worked as an investigative reporter for ProPublica and as a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. His latest book is Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World (https://amzn.to/2Xy5Afz) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-are-iq-scores-rising-industrialization-rewired-our-minds Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How fast is Earth traveling through space? That depends. | Michelle Thaller How fast is Earth traveling through space? That depends. | Michelle Thaller
1 week ago En
If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ We are hurtling through space. But where are we going? - How fast are you, planet Earth, our solar system, and the galaxy moving right now? There's no one answer to that question because we're going in several directions and multiple speeds all at the same time. How is that possible? - Within the Milky Way galaxy, our solar system is orbiting around a massive black hole at the center of galaxy at half a million miles an hour. Separately, the Milky Way galaxy is in the Virgo Supercluster, which is falling into the Great Attractor, a huge group of galaxies called the Laniakea Supercluster, at one and a half million miles an hour. - And all of that is superimposed on top of the natural expansion of the universe, which isn't really a speed, but is happening at 75 kilometers per second per megaparsec. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-fast-is-earth-moving-through-space Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Criminal reform: Why wake-up calls are windows of opportunity | Bishop Omar Jahwar Criminal reform: Why wake-up calls are windows of opportunity | Bishop Omar Jahwar
1 week ago En
If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ Here's how we can use the concept of 'impact impression' for criminal reform. - In his work in criminal reform, Bishop Omar Jahwar recounts how a person's life trajectory can typically be traced back to a moment of trauma or an 'impact impression'. - An impact impression has two outcomes: It can be an awakening that steers people in a positive direction where they seek help, or it can become a negative spiral that lands them in prison. In the latter case, supporting people in undoing the damage and mental scars they've incurred from such impact impressions can help reduce recidivism. Bishop Omar Jahwar is a Pastor and internationally renowned community leader dedicated to ending senseless violence, strengthening communities and promoting strong families. His efforts to revive Urban Culture began over 20 years ago on the streets of Dallas, TX. *The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/criminal-reform-why-wake-up-calls-are-windows-of-opportunity Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Self-command: Learn this powerful thinking tool | Emily Chamlee-Wright Self-command: Learn this powerful thinking tool | Emily Chamlee-Wright
1 week ago En
When should you censor yourself, and when should you speak up? Emily Chamlee-Wright explains moral philosopher Adam Smith's 'impartial spectator'. 18th-century moral philosopher Adam Smith argued that you could measure the appropriateness of your words and actions by satisfying an imaginary judge he called the impartial spectator. Switching perspectives to listen to that impartial spectator is a difficult skill as it requires self-command to triumph over self-love. Wise people imagine the spectator's response and use it to help steer productive discourse – especially in difficult and chaotic debates. Self-command is an intellectual virtue. It's a thinking tool that helps us know when to self-censor and when to speak up in the interest of civil discourse and truth seeking. Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright is the president and CEO of the Institute for Humane Studies, which supports and partners with scholars working within the classical liberal tradition. She was previously Provost and Dean at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. Prior to joining Washington College, she was Elbert Neese Professor of Economics and Associate Dean at Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/self-command-learn-this-powerful-thinking-tool Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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What makes a good leader: strength or smarts? | Nicholas Christakis What makes a good leader: strength or smarts? | Nicholas Christakis
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge by subscribing to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge When it comes to leadership, we're quite picky on who we let govern us. - Research suggests that human beings are equipped for, and even prefer, a kind of mild hierarchy. - However, there is a certain alchemy behind successful leaders. For instance, we don't want leaders that are too powerful or too autocratic or are too able to impose punishment on ourselves. - The best leaders foster connections, friendships, and cooperation among their subordinates. Nicholas A. Christakis is a physician, sociologist, and director of the Human Nature Lab at Yale University, where he is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science. His most recent book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society. (https://amzn.to/2VpXp3S) Follow him on Twitter @NAChristakis Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How America could become a dictatorship in 10 years | Jared Diamond How America could become a dictatorship in 10 years | Jared Diamond
1 week ago En
- Much like in marriage, you also have to have to have political compromise in a country. - During the last few decades, American elected representatives and our electorates succeeded in reaching compromise about difficult issues. However, political compromise seems to be breaking down today. - This breakdown, Diamond posits, is the "most serious" problem the United States faces because it could preciptate the rise of a dictatorship in the country. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/politics-2638648890 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Michio Kaku: Why flat-Earth theory and anti-vax conspiracies exist Michio Kaku: Why flat-Earth theory and anti-vax conspiracies exist
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge by subscribing to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - If you see animals when you look at clouds or see faces in pieces of wood, that's called pareidolia: the phenomenon of making familiar objects from vague stimuli. - Humans evolved to be superstitious, and Michio Kaku posits that there is a gene for superstition and magical thinking. Nine times out of 10, your beliefs can be wrong, but one time out of 10 it saved your ancestors' butts, says Kaku. -Flat Earthers and anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists exist now, and they will still exist in 1,000 years, says Kaku. It's natural. Humans evolved to believe in nonsense, but it's by becoming good at something totally unnatural to us – science – that reason can prevail. Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). He is the author of The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth (https://amzn.to/314zgD5) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-flat-earth-theory-and-anti-vax-conspiracies-exist Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The key to ending online hate? Treat it like a virus. | Sarah Ruger The key to ending online hate? Treat it like a virus. | Sarah Ruger
2 weeks ago En
It will take a crack team of scientists, programmers and philosophers to cure on the online hate pandemic. - If online hate is a contagion, as suggested by neuroscientist Joel Finkelstein, then perhaps the most effective course of action will come from treating it as a virus: Gather an interdisciplinary team of minds to study the mechanics of the virus and treat it. - The internet is as big a disruption to society as the printing press was. Sarah Ruger sees the road toward social peace as one where neuroscientists, technologists, conflict resolution theorists and philosophers all work together to create a digital culture that brings out the best in humanity, not the worst. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/the-key-to-ending-online-hate-treat-it-like-a-virus Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Is the universe a hologram? The strange physics of black holes | Michelle Thaller Is the universe a hologram? The strange physics of black holes | Michelle Thaller
2 weeks ago En
Black holes may give us a glimpse of the underlying nature of reality. - Since energy cannot be destroyed, only transformed, some argue that information — arguably a form of energy — cannot be destroyed either. So then, what happens to information when it is absorbed into a black hole? Scientists don't know for certain, but some posit that it may be possible for it to leak away from the black hole over time. - Black holes may hold information in a two-dimensional manner similar to a hologram, which take on three dimensions when light is shone through them. Some theorize that the underlying nature of reality can be glimpsed through black holes — that all the information about the entire universe is somehow held on a two-dimensional space of something. - To better understand how black holes work, as well as the elements surrounding them, we may need a level of physics to be developed. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/black-holes Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How social narratives stop us from being happy | Andrea Breanna How social narratives stop us from being happy | Andrea Breanna
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Many of us are trying to fit into existing roles that aren't specially crafted for us, and, as a result, we don't fit perfectly in them. This causes us a lot of stress and anxiety. - Though many people aren't transgender, they can still relate to the feeling of not completely fitting in, and having to figure out their own path. Often finding out own way directly overlaps with figuring out what makes us happy. - When someone is trans, it is possible for them to feel attracted to either gender. For example, Breanna wishes she could tell her teenage self that it is possible to "be a girl and like girls."Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Comedian Pete Holmes on depression and negative emotion Comedian Pete Holmes on depression and negative emotion
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Everyone's experience with depression is different, but for comedian Pete Holmes the key to living with depression has been to observe his own thoughts in an impartial way. - Holmes' method, taught to him by psychologist and spiritual leader Ram Dass, is to connect to his base consciousness and think about himself and his emotions in the third person. - You can't push depression away, but you can shift your mindset to help better cope with depression, anxiety, and negative emotions. If you feel depressed, you can connect with a crisis counselor anytime in the US. Pete Holmes is a comedian, writer, cartoonist, "Christ-leaning spiritual seeker", and podcast host. His wildly popular podcast, You Made It Weird, is a comedic exploration of the meaning of life with guests ranging from Deepak Chopra and Elizabeth Gilbert to Seth Rogen and Garry Shandling. He is the author of Comedy Sex God (https://amzn.to/2HoF7dB) Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Neuroprosthetics and deep brain stimulation: Two big neuroscience breakthroughs | Susan Hockfield Neuroprosthetics and deep brain stimulation: Two big neuroscience breakthroughs | Susan Hockfield
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge by subscribing to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Neuroscience is working to conquer some of the human body's cruelest conditions: Paralysis, brain disease, and schizophrenia. - Neuroscience and engineering are uniting in mind-blowing ways that will drastically improve the quality of life for people with conditions like epilepsy, paralysis or schizophrenia. - Researchers have developed a brain-computer interface the size of a baby aspirin that can restore mobility to people with paralysis or amputated limbs. It rewires neural messages from the brain's motor cortex to a robotic arm, or reroutes it to the person's own muscles. - Deep brain stimulation is another wonder of neuroscience that can effectively manage brain conditions like epilepsy, Parkinson's, and may one day mitigate schizophrenia so people can live normal, independent lives. Susan Hockfield is a neuroscientist based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 2004 to 2012, she served as the 16th president of the university. Hockfield was the first woman, and the first life scientist, to lead the institute. Prior to MIT, she worked at Yale University, where she served in myriad capacities. Among them, the William Edward Gilbert Professor of Neurobiology, Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Provost. She is the author of "The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution" (https://amzn.to/2EfEZMT) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/neuroprosthetics-and-deep-brain-stimulation-two-big-neuroscience-breakthroughs Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Stand up against religious discrimination – even if it’s not your religion | Eboo Patel Stand up against religious discrimination – even if it’s not your religion | Eboo Patel
3 weeks ago En
As religious diversity increases in the United States, we must learn to channel religious identity into interfaith cooperation. - Religious diversity is the norm in American life, and that diversity is only increasing, says Eboo Patel. - Using the most painful moment of his life as a lesson, Eboo Patel explains why it's crucial to be positive and proactive about engaging religious identity towards interfaith cooperation. Eboo Patel is the founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), a national nonprofit working to make interfaith cooperation a social norm. He is the author of the books Acts of Faith, Sacred Ground, Interfaith Leadership and Out of Many Faiths (https://amzn.to/2HxUKk7). Eboo holds a doctorate in the sociology of religion from Oxford University, where he studied on a Rhodes scholarship Out of Many Faiths: Religious Diversity and the American Promise . The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/stand-up-against-religious-discrimination-even-if-its-not-your-religion Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The psychology of moral grandstanding | Brandon Warmke The psychology of moral grandstanding | Brandon Warmke
3 weeks ago En
Moral grandstanding is a vanity project that sabotages public discourse says moral philosopher Brandon Warmke. - Moral grandstanding is the use of moral talk for self-promotion. Moral grandstanders have egotistical motives: they may want to signal that they have superhuman insight into a topic, paint themselves as a victim, or show that they care more than others. - Moral philosophers view moral grandstanding as a net negative. They argue that it contributes to political polarization, increases levels of cynicism about moral talk and its value in public life, and it causes outrage exhaustion. - Grandstanders are also a kind of social free rider, says Brandon Warmke. They get the benefits of being heard without contributing to any valuable discourse. It's selfish behavior at best, and divisive behavior at worst. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/the-psychology-of-moral-grandstanding Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Michio Kaku forecasts the future of space travel Michio Kaku forecasts the future of space travel
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge by subscribing to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Mega-rich entrepreneurs are taking us where no human being has gone before. - During the first golden era of space exploration, we went to the moon. Then we sort of dropped the ball for 50 years. - The problem is space travel is very expensive, especially the way governments do space travel. - Because it costs $10,000 to put a pound of anything into orbit around the planet, we need to have an infusion of public and private funds. That's where billionaires such as Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos come into the picture. With their help, we have new energies, new strategies, and new plans to go back into outer space. Michio Kaku is a futurist, popularizer of science, and theoretical physicist, as well as a bestselling author and the host of two radio programs. He is the co-founder of string field theory (a branch of string theory), and continues Einstein’s search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified theory. He holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics and a joint appointment at City College of New York and the Graduate Center of C.U.N.Y. He is also a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. His latest book is The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth (https://amzn.to/2HupId6) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/michio-kaku-2637674377 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Will the 1% act on inequality before the riots start? | Jared Diamond Will the 1% act on inequality before the riots start? | Jared Diamond
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge by subscribing to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Riots may ensue as more poor Americans recognize their "miserable" long-term prospects. - How bad is wealth inequality in the United States? About 1 percent of Americans hold 80 percent of the money. - In the United States, the correlation between the income of parents and the income of their children when they grow up is higher than in any other country in the world. - One of the big underlying reasons for poverty is receiving a crummy education, which in turn leads to crummy jobs. When people recognize their miserable long-term prospects, they are more likely to partake in riots. Jared Diamond, a noted polymath, is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among his many awards are the U.S. National Medal of Science, Japan's Cosmos Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of the international best-selling books Guns, Germs, and Steel; Collapse; Why Is Sex Fun?; The World Until Yesterday; and The Third Chimpanzee, and is the presenter of TV documentary series based on three of those books. He is the author of "Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis" (http://bit.ly/jardiamond) Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How AI will liberate doctors from keyboards and basements | Eric Topol How AI will liberate doctors from keyboards and basements | Eric Topol
4 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of learning. Subscribe to Big Think Edge here: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Machines can help doctors by spotting abnormalities in X-rays or MRA scans that the physicians themselves may have missed. - A.I. can also help physicians by analyzing data and, through the use of algorithms, produce possible diagnoses. - The freed up time, as doctors make their rounds, can help physicians establish better connections with their patients, which in turn can lead to better treatment plans. Eric Topol, a professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at Scripps, is an executive vice president at Scripps Research and the founder and director of Scripps Research Translational Institute (previously Scripps Translational Science Institute). His work melds genomics, big data, and both information technologies and digital health technologies to advance the promise of personalized medicine. He is the author of Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again (https://amzn.to/2DQ1xmX) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/ai-2637549115 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Fascism and conspiracy theories: The symptoms of broken communication | John Cameron Mitchell Fascism and conspiracy theories: The symptoms of broken communication | John Cameron Mitchell
4 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of learning. Subscribe to Big Think Edge here: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge The lost practice of face-to-face communication has made the world a more extreme place. - The world was saner when we spoke face-to-face, argues John Cameron Mitchell. Not looking someone in the eye when you talk to them raises the potential for miscommunication and conflict. - Social media has been an incredible force for activism and human rights, but it's also negatively affected our relationship with the media. We are now bombarded 24/7 with news that either drives us to anger or apathy. - Sitting behind a screen makes polarization worse, and polarization is fertile ground for conspiracy theories and fascism, which Cameron describes as irrationally blaming someone else for your problems. John Cameron Mitchell directed, starred in and co-wrote, with Stephen Trask, the musical film Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001), for which he received the Best Director Award at the Sundance Festival and was nominated for a Golden Globe as Best Actor. His recent Broadway production garnered the 2014 Tony Award for Best Revival of Musical and a 2015 Special Tony for his return to the role. His latest work is the radio-cinema podcast "Anthem: Homunculus." Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/fascism-and-conspiracy-theories-the-symptoms-of-broken-communication Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Nanotechnology vs. cancer: How tiny particles sniff out the deadly disease | Susan Hockfield Nanotechnology vs. cancer: How tiny particles sniff out the deadly disease | Susan Hockfield
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of learning. Subscribe to Big Think Edge here: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge We may be able to detect cancer soon by simply peeing on a stick. - Cancer is an aberrant function of a normal cell, where the regulators of that cell's dividing are broken and the cell starts to divide without regulation. Left to its own devices, that dividing without regulation will overcome the entire body. - Until we have a cure, early detection is the holy grail. MIT professor Sangeeta Bhatia is currently devising a simple urine test that works just like a pregnancy test to detect cancer the moment it starts. - How does it work? Nanoparticles are injected into the body that force specific peptides, previously invisible signs of cancer, to be easily detected in urine. In the future, this test may be part of your yearly physical check-up. Susan Hockfield is a neuroscientist based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 2004 to 2012, she served as the 16th president of the university. Hockfield was the first woman, and the first life scientist, to lead the institute. Prior to MIT, she worked at Yale University, where she served in myriad capacities. Among them, the William Edward Gilbert Professor of Neurobiology, Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Provost. She is the author of "The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution" (https://amzn.to/2EfEZMT) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/cancer-detection-test Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Befriend your ideological opposite. It’s fun. | Nadine Strossen Befriend your ideological opposite. It’s fun. | Nadine Strossen
1 month ago En
Step inside the unlikely friendship of a former ACLU president and an ultra-conservative Supreme Court Justice. - Former president of the ACLU Nadine Strossen and Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia were unlikely friends. They debated each other at events all over the world, and because of that developed a deep and rewarding friendship – despite their immense differences. - Scalia, a famous conservative, was invited to circles that were not his "home territory", such as the ACLU, to debate his views. Here, Strossen expresses her gratitude and respect for his commitment to the exchange of ideas. - "It's really sad that people seem to think that if you disagree with somebody on some issues you can't be mutually respectful, you can't enjoy each other's company, you can't learn from each other and grow in yourself," says Strossen. She is the author of HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship (https://amzn.to/2JLim6C) The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/friends-ideas Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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‘Fighting the good fight’: Why free speech has no political party | Jonathan Zimmerman ‘Fighting the good fight’: Why free speech has no political party | Jonathan Zimmerman
1 month ago En
What can and can't you say? A brief glimpse of precedent-setting free speech cases in the United States. - There's a reason you're free to wear clothing with protest statements on them today. In 1968, 19-year-old Paul Robert Cohen was arrested for disturbing the peace by wearing a jacked that read "F*ck the Draft" in a California courthouse. His case went to the U.S. Supreme Court, which decided that being offended by the jacket did not merit censorship. - Jonathan Zimmerman argues that the history of debate in the U.S. – of who gets to say what, and how that has evolved – should be taught to every American. - Zimmerman also says it's ahistorical for free speech to be cast as a conservative issue. For much of U.S. history, champions of free speech were those who fought for social justice to help the powerless keep the only power they had: their voices. Jonathan Zimmerman is Professor of History of Education at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. A former Peace Corps volunteer and high school social studies teacher, Zimmerman is the author of "Campus Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know" and six other books. He is also a frequent contributor to The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New York Review of Books, and other popular periodicals. His latest book is "The Case for Contention: Teaching Controversial Issues in American Schools (https://amzn.to/2Q7PeHF) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/free-speech-history Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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God was watching me. And I was watching porn. | Pete Holmes God was watching me. And I was watching porn. | Pete Holmes
1 month ago En
Comedian Pete Holmes details his struggle with faith, sex, and God. He is the author of Comedy Sex God (https://amzn.to/2HoF7dB) - Holmes explains how he lost his faith after a long struggle with what he calls his Christian, puritanical, shame psychology. - He found the antidote to internalized shame was 'thoughtless, irrational love'. Love should be as indiscriminate as light, he says. Many people only give conditional love to themselves and others. - Sexuality is not a mistake, says Holmes. Pretending to be pure by saying frack instead of fuck, and not seeing R-rated movies and being really "nice" is not what a connection to the divine is about. Pete Holmes is a comedian, writer, cartoonist, "Christ-leaning spiritual seeker", and podcast host. His wildly popular podcast, You Made It Weird, is a comedic exploration of the meaning of life with guests ranging from Deepak Chopra and Elizabeth Gilbert to Seth Rogen and Garry Shandling. He is the author of Comedy Sex God (https://amzn.to/2HoF7dB) Forget Mother's Day? Give your mom the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. 50% OFF UNTIL MAY 15! http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Which voter type are you? How politicians divide and conquer. | Bill Eddy Which voter type are you? How politicians divide and conquer. | Bill Eddy
1 month ago En
Miss Mother's Day? Give your mom the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. 50% off UNTIL MAY 15: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge There's a reason people are "triggered" during voting time. - People seeking to win an election often use emotional words to trigger voters. - These emotional words tend to trigger people into four different groups: loyalists, riled-up resisters, mild moderates, and disenchanted drop-outs. - What we see today is people getting into power with less than a majority of people because they're able to divide this four-way voter split. Bill Eddy is the co-founder and president of the High Conflict Institute, a company devoted to helping individuals and organizations deal with high-conflict people. Eddy is a Certified Family Law Specialist and Senior Family Mediator at the National Conflict Resolution Center in San Diego. He is also a Licensed Clinical Social worker with twelve years' experience providing therapy to children, adults, couples and families in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient clinics. His latest book is "Why We Elect Narcissists and Sociopaths―and How We Can Stop" (https://amzn.to/2vpWKUH) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/politics-2637000462 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Jared Diamond's immigration thought experiment: Divide the strong and weak Jared Diamond's immigration thought experiment: Divide the strong and weak
1 month ago En
It's Mother's Day tomorrow! Give your mom the gift of knowledge with a subscription to Big Think Edge. 50% OFF NOW: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Don't denigrate immigrants, says Jared Diamond. You are one. - Every American, without exception, is an immigrant. Native Americans immigrated 13,000 years ago, and everybody else has immigrated within the last 400 years. - The decision to emigrate is made by people who are healthy, strong, willing to undertake risks, and face the unknown. Those are also essential qualities for innovating. - It's no coincidence that the great majority of American Nobel Prize winners are either first-generation immigrants or the children of first-generation immigrants. Jared Diamond, a noted polymath, is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among his many awards are the U.S. National Medal of Science, Japan's Cosmos Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of the international best-selling books Guns, Germs, and Steel; Collapse; Why Is Sex Fun?; The World Until Yesterday; and The Third Chimpanzee, and is the presenter of TV documentary series based on three of those books. He is the author of "Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis" (http://bit.ly/jardiamond) Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Does life feel too short? Get off your ass. | Erling Kagge Does life feel too short? Get off your ass. | Erling Kagge
1 month ago En
Give your mom the gift of knowledge this Mother's Day. Get 50% off a subscription to Big Think Edge. SIGN UP NOW: https://edge.bigthink.com/users/sign_up In 1654, Blaise Pascal wrote: "All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone." That's more true today than ever. - Explorer Erling Kagge is the first person to have completed the Three Poles Challenge on foot: the North Pole, the South Pole, and the summit of Mount Everest. - The average American spends 4 hours each day on their phone. Imagine that 20% of it is productive. That still means that at the end of your life you'll have spent a cumulative 4,000 days on what Kagge calls "bullshit". - Walking is the engine of life – you can do it alone, learning to cultivate your thoughts; you can walk to meet people and learn to respect humanity; and you can walk to experience nature. Don't live through other people or through apps. Get out and explore. Explorer, art collector, publisher, and author, Erling Kagge is the first person to have completed the Three Poles Challenge on foot--the North Pole, the South Pole, and the summit of Mount Everest. He has written six books on exploration, philosophy, and art collecting, and runs Kagge Forlag, a publishing company based in Oslo, where he lives. His latest book is Walking: One Step At a Time (https://amzn.to/2WFOLiA) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/does-life-feel-too-short-get-off-your-ass Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Take a pause to let your mind work | Podcast producer John Cameron Mitchell Take a pause to let your mind work | Podcast producer John Cameron Mitchell
1 month ago En
Mother's Day is coming. Get your mom the gift of Big Think Edge - it's 50% off until May 15. SAVE HERE: https://edge.bigthink.com/users/sign_up Why the culture that destroyed attention spans is now turning to podcasts. - Taking a pause after consuming a piece of art or media is essential to our memory, emotions, and intellectual digestion, says writer, director and podcaster John Cameron Mitchell. - We live in an age full of influencers and YouTube personalities, but fewer narrative powerhouses. Storytelling takes time, skill, and requires us to make space to gather our thoughts. - Podcasts are a storytelling rebellion against so-called ADHD culture. If the internet ruined our attention spans, can the single-sense format of podcasts bring it back? John Cameron Mitchell directed, starred in and co-wrote, with Stephen Trask, the musical film Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001), for which he received the Best Director Award at the Sundance Festival and was nominated for a Golden Globe as Best Actor. His recent Broadway production garnered the 2014 Tony Award for Best Revival of Musical and a 2015 Special Tony for his return to the role. His latest work is the radio-cinema podcast Anthem: Homunculus (https://bit.ly/2vPQbuO) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/take-a-pause-to-let-your-mind-work Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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John Stuart Mill's big idea: Harsh critics make good thinkers | Keith Whittington John Stuart Mill's big idea: Harsh critics make good thinkers | Keith Whittington
1 month ago En
Keith Whittington, Professor of Politics at Princeton University, breaks down three key free speech arguments by John Stuart Mill. - 19th-century political philosopher John Stuart Mill defended the right of free societies to explore radical and dangerous ideas. - One of his arguments was based on humility: You must be prepared to be wrong, and genuinely be open to being persuaded. Put your ideas into intellectual battle by exposing them to the harshest critics. These critics will show up your flaws and make you a more sophisticated thinker. - Another of Mill's arguments was concerned with arrogance. He criticized the common tendency to want to shield other people from dangerous ideas as paternalistic. You can judge good ideas from bad ideas; you should afford everyone the same respect. Keith E. Whittington is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University. He is the author, most recently, of "Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech" (https://amzn.to/2LsLl1i), as well as "Repugnant Laws: Judicial Review of Acts of Congress from the Founding to the Present" (https://amzn.to/2V9jYsJ). Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/john-stuart-mill Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How to remember everything you read | Shane Parrish How to remember everything you read | Shane Parrish
1 month ago En
Tips on how to intensify engagement with what you're reading. One of the ways you can deconstruct an argument is being actively attuned to what you're reading. To better remember content, take a blank sheet of paper and write down what you know about that subject. You can write it in bullet points. When you later come back to what you're reading, go to that sheet and skim it – it will prime your brain for what you're going. Shane Parrish is a former Canadian intelligence officer and the founder of Farnam Street, a go-to resource that CEOs, athletes, professional coaches and entrepreneurs rely on to find signal in a world of noise. Shane's work has been featured in nearly every major publication, including Forbes, Huffington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and most recently, the New York Times. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/reading Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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A mind-blowing explanation of the speed of light | Michelle Thaller A mind-blowing explanation of the speed of light | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
Light exists outside of time. - The only things that travel at the speed of light are photons. - Nothing with any mass at all can travel at the speed of light because as it gets closer and closer to the speed of light, its mass increases. And if it were actually traveling at the speed of light, it would have an infinite mass. - Light does not experience space or time. It's not just a speed going through something. All of the universe shifts around this constant, the speed of light. Time and space itself stop when you go that speed. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/speed-of-light Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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The science of why we die | Michael Shermer The science of why we die | Michael Shermer
1 month ago En
- According to scientists the reason we die is because the second law of thermodynamics and natural selection. - The whole universe runs down, so, ultimately, even if you could lengthen your lifespan indefinitely, the universe itself will eventually die in a heat death. - We die, one predominant view goes, so that our progeny may live — because there are limited resources. Dr. Michael Shermer is the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, and Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality, and Utopia (https://amzn.to/2VKRZUI) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-we-die-2636378903 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Depression is a silent killer. A.I. is turning up the volume. | Eric Topol Depression is a silent killer. A.I. is turning up the volume. | Eric Topol
1 month ago En
- Artificial intelligence can digitize a person's state of mind by gathering data from their social media feeds and listening to them talk. - The filters you use on photos, the kinds of content you post, as well as your speech (your tone, sighs, and rate of speech) are just a few ways AI can detect depression or evaluate whether medications are working or not. - Furthermore, research shows people would rather confide their deepest feelings to an avatar than a human being. AI mental health coaches are already on the horizon – an effective and necessary development as we face a shortage of mental health professionals. Eric Topol, a professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at Scripps, is an executive vice president at Scripps Research and the founder and director of Scripps Research Translational Institute (previously Scripps Translational Science Institute). His work melds genomics, big data, and both information technologies and digital health technologies to advance the promise of personalized medicine. He is the author of Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again (https://amzn.to/2DQ1xmX) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/depression-is-a-silent-killer-a-i-is-turning-up-the-volume Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Joyless economies: Unregulated capitalism, slavery, and feudalism | Yanis Varoufakis Joyless economies: Unregulated capitalism, slavery, and feudalism | Yanis Varoufakis
1 month ago En
Modern capitalism is a "very silly" way of organizing life, says Yanis Varoufakis. - Wealth inequality in modern capitalism creates a joyless economy for both the rich and the poor, says Yanis Varoufakis. - Wealth inequality in a time of economic abundance makes society less civilized. More evenly distributed resources allow humans to create the literature, art and intellectual works that make human life richer. - The universalized depression and stress caused by inequality is "incongruent with our fantastic advances at the technological level," says Varoufakis. Yanis Varoufakis is the former finance minister of Greece and the cofounder of an international grassroots movement, DiEM25, that is campaigning for the revival of democracy in Europe. He is the author of And the Weak Suffer What They Must? and The Global Minotaur. After teaching for many years in the United States, Britain, and Australia, he is currently a professor of economics at the University of Athens. His most recent books are "Adults in the Room" and "Talking to My Daughter About the Economy: or, How Capitalism Works--and How It Fails" (https://amzn.to/2DGDyqn) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/wealth-inequality Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why stressing about aging shortens your life | Ashton Applewhite Why stressing about aging shortens your life | Ashton Applewhite
1 month ago En
Dementia, disrespect, and loneliness – that is not your future, says aging expert Ashton Applewhite. - The best anti-aging advice? Stop stereotyping old people! Cultural messaging about the pitfalls of old age causes undue stress that prematurely ages the brain and shortens life spans. - People who have a positive outlook on aging can live 7.5 years longer than those who buy into cultural stereotypes about getting old. I - t's important to look at the positives of aging, not just the risk factors: Alzheimer's rates are declining, 'mental sifting' can make us wiser, and older workers injure themselves less often than younger workers. Ashton Applewhite is a Brooklyn-based activist and writer. Her latest book, This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism, debunks many myths about late life (https://goo.gl/Ln6idn) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/stressing-about-aging-damages-your-brain-shortens-your-life Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Why pitting prejudices against each other keeps society free | Jonathan Rauch Why pitting prejudices against each other keeps society free | Jonathan Rauch
1 month ago En
Should all speech be free? How much intolerance should society tolerate? - For society to stay open and free, you don't need to eliminate prejudice. You need the opposite: All kinds of prejudice pitted against each other. - Intellectual diversity helps society as a whole learn the truth. And as long as society has rules that force ideas to be openly tested, the intolerant will not gain the upper hand. - "In America it's legal to be intolerant. It may not be right. It may not get you accepted or respected. But absolutely it's legal and it should be legal," says Jonathan Rauch. Jonathan Rauch is the author of six books and many articles on public policy, culture, and government. He is a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, a contributing editor of The Atlantic, and recipient of the 2005 National Magazine Award. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/free-speech Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Opinion journalism keeps the lights on. But at what cost? | Alice Dreger Opinion journalism keeps the lights on. But at what cost? | Alice Dreger
1 month ago En
Opinion is more compelling than fact. That's tearing society apart. - Basic facts are up for debate, especially in the realm of science and politics. So which facts can you trust? Start by looking at trusted sources like Wikipedia, Snopes, and factcheck.org. - "If people with money don't start supporting fact-checking systems then fact-checking systems will become increasingly rarer," says Dreger. - Digital audiences are in the habit of sharing and reposting op-eds that agree with their existing opinions, rather than seeking out factual reporting. Opinion journalism makes money. Factual reporting makes less. That's a problem. Alice Dreger is an historian of medicine and science, a sex researcher, an award-winning writer, and an (im)patient advocate. Dreger’s latest major work is Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and the Search for Justice in Science (https://amzn.to/2DGDyqn). Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/opinion-journalism Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How listening to the universe can help quiet your self-doubt | Michelle Thaller How listening to the universe can help quiet your self-doubt | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
- We all exprience self-doubt — sometimes called 'imposter syndrome'. - NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller explains how the universe itself has been a salve for her fears. - The universe chooses people to be interested it, she says. What has the universe chosen you for? Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/imposter-syndrome Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Want to get more from books? Stop reading them cover to cover. | Shane Parrish Want to get more from books? Stop reading them cover to cover. | Shane Parrish
1 month ago En
- We've been taught to treat books like a linear experiece: start, then continue reading until the end. - But problematic because it doesnt correspond to how we actually extract knowledge from books. - Here are a few ways you can get more from reading books while investing less of your precious time. Shane Parrish is a former Canadian intelligence officer and the founder of Farnam Street, a go-to resource that CEOs, athletes, professional coaches and entrepreneurs rely on to find signal in a world of noise. Shane's work has been featured in nearly every major publication, including Forbes, Huffington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and most recently, the New York Times. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/reading-books Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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How high-conflict personalities capture high office | Bill Eddy How high-conflict personalities capture high office | Bill Eddy
1 month ago En
- High-conflict personalities possesses 4 qualities that may encourage them to become politicians. - Overly emotional communication suits high-conflict personalities and drives the media to cover them. - As with any conman, relationships with high-conflict personalities are calculated and transactional. Bill Eddy is the co-founder and president of the High Conflict Institute, a company devoted to helping individuals and organizations deal with high-conflict people. Eddy is a Certified Family Law Specialist and Senior Family Mediator at the National Conflict Resolution Center in San Diego. He is also a Licensed Clinical Social worker with twelve years' experience providing therapy to children, adults, couples and families in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient clinics. His latest book is "Why We Elect Narcissists and Sociopaths―and How We Can Stop" (https://amzn.to/2vpWKUH) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/high-conflict Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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'Resulting': Don’t mistake a bad outcome for a bad decision | Annie Duke 'Resulting': Don’t mistake a bad outcome for a bad decision | Annie Duke
1 month ago En
- Bad outcomes get criticized as evidence of bad decisions, but that's not necessarily so. - Here, poker pro Annie Duke desribes a simple thought experiment that separates decisions from outcomes. - It is quite possible to make a very good decision that, due to external factors, results in a bad outcome. Annie Duke has leveraged her expertise in the science of smart decision making to excel at pursuits as varied as championship poker to public speaking. For two decades, Annie was one of the top poker players in the world. In 2004, she bested a field of 234 players to win her first World Series of Poker (WSOP) bracelet. The same year, she triumphed in the $2 million winner-take-all, invitation-only WSOP Tournament of Champions. In 2010, she won the prestigious NBC National Heads-Up Poker Championship. She is the author of 'Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts' (https://amzn.to/2UOhJLq) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/decision-making?rebelltitem=1#rebelltitem1 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Ageism in the USA: The paradox of prejudice against the elderly | Ashton Applewhite Ageism in the USA: The paradox of prejudice against the elderly | Ashton Applewhite
1 month ago En
- Prejudice is typically perpetrated against 'the other', i.e. a group outside our own. - But ageism is prejudice against ourselves — at least, the people we will (hopefully!) become. - Different generations needs to cooperate now more than ever to solve global problems. Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Free speech on college campuses: A bottom-up approach is best | Emily Chamlee-Wright Free speech on college campuses: A bottom-up approach is best | Emily Chamlee-Wright
1 month ago En
- There are 2 different approaches to governing free speech on college campuses. - One is a morality/order approach. The other is a bottom-up approach. - Emily Chamlee-Wright says there are many benefits to having no one central authority on what is appropriate speech. Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright is the president and CEO of the Institute for Humane Studies, which supports and partners with scholars working within the classical liberal tradition. She was previously Provost and Dean at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. Prior to joining Washington College, she was Elbert Neese Professor of Economics and Associate Dean at Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/free-speech-college-campus Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Stopping climate change will pump trillions into the economy | David Wallace-Wells Stopping climate change will pump trillions into the economy | David Wallace-Wells
1 month ago En
- Climate change is no longer a financial problem, just a political one. - Mitigating climate change by decarbonizing our economy would add trillions of dollars in new investments. - Public attitudes toward climate change have shifted steadily in favor of action. Now it's up to elected leaders. David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine. He was previously the deputy editor of The Paris Review. He lives in New York City. His latest book is The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming (https://goo.gl/ih35YX) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/climate-change-economy Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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Was Oumuamua an alien spaceship? No. Here’s what it is. | Michelle Thaller Was Oumuamua an alien spaceship? No. Here’s what it is. | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
- Oumuamua, a quarter-mile long asteroid tumbling through space, is Hawaiian for "scout", or "the first of many". - It was given this name because it came from another solar system. - Some claimed 'Oumuamua was an alien technology, but there's no actual evidence for that. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/oumuamua Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
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