Big Think
Big Think is the leading source of expert-driven, actionable, educational content -- with thousands of videos, featuring experts ranging from Bill Clinton to Bill Nye, we help you get smarter, faster. We aim to help you explore the big ideas and core skills that define knowledge in the 21st century, so you can apply them to the questions and challenges in your own life.

1705 videos
Biohacking: Why I’ll live to be 180 years old | Dave Asprey Biohacking: Why I’ll live to be 180 years old | Dave Asprey
15 hours ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge From computer hacking to biohacking, Dave Asprey has embarked on a quest to reverse the aging process. - As a teenager, founder of Bulletproof, Dave Asprey, began experiencing health issues that typically plague older adults. - After surrounding himself with anti-aging researchers and scientists, he discovered the tools of biohacking could dramatically change his life and improve his health. - He's now confident he'll live to at least 180 years old. "It turns out that those tools that make older people young make younger people kick ass," he says. Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur, professional biohacker, the New York Times bestselling author of Game Changers, Head Strong and The Bulletproof Diet, the creator of Bulletproof Coffee, and the host of Bulletproof Radio, the Webby Award–winning, number one–ranked podcast. His new book is Super Human: The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever (https://amzn.to/2TMRWEp) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/biohacking Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Ethnic chauvinism: Why the whole world shouldn’t look like America | Sean McFate Ethnic chauvinism: Why the whole world shouldn’t look like America | Sean McFate
1 day ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge We are constantly trying to force the world to look like us — we need to move on. - When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, many Americans jumped for joy. At the time, some believed there weren't going to be any more political disagreements anywhere in the world. They thought American democracy had won the "war of ideas." - American exceptionalism has sought to create a world order that's really a mirror image of ourselves — a liberal world order founded on the DNA of American thinking. To many abroad this looks like ethnic chauvinism. - We need to move on from this way of thinking, and consider that sometimes "problem-solving," in global affairs, means the world makes us look like how it wants to be. Dr. Sean McFate is an adviser to Oxford University's Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, as well as a professor of strategy at the National Defense University and Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Washington, DC. Additionally, he is the author of several books, including "Shadow War", "The Modern Mercenary" and his latest, "The New Rules of War" ( https://amzn.to/2zagMo2) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/sean-mcfate-ethnic-chauvinism Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to heal trauma with meaning: A case study in emotional evolution How to heal trauma with meaning: A case study in emotional evolution
1 day ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge As tempting as it may be to run away from emotionally-difficult situations, it's important we confront them head-on. - Impossible-sounding things are possible in hospitals — however, there are times when we hit dead ends. In these moments, it's important to not run away, but to confront what's happening head-on. - For a lot of us, one of the ways to give meaning to terrible moments is to see what you can learn from them. - Sometimes certain information can "flood" us in ways that aren't helpful, and it's important to figure out what types of data you are able to take in — process — at certain times. BJ Miller, MD, is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco where he practices and teaches palliative medicine. He has been profiled in The New York Times Magazine, and interviewed on Super Soul Sunday, The Tim Ferriss Show, and On Being with Krista Tippett, and has spoken at the Aspen Ideas Festival and around the world. He is the author of "A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death” https://amzn.to/30rkG8l If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
3 ways to find a meaningful job, or find purpose in the job you already have | Aaron Hurst 3 ways to find a meaningful job, or find purpose in the job you already have | Aaron Hurst
2 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Broaching the question "What is my purpose?" is daunting – it's a grandiose idea, but research can make it a little more approachable if work is where you find your meaning. It turns out you can redesign your job to have maximum purpose. - There are 3 ways people find meaning at work, what Aaron Hurst calls the three elevations of impact. About a third of the population finds meaning at an individual level, from seeing the direct impact of their work on other people. Another third of people find their purpose at an organizational level. And the last third of people find meaning at a social level. - "What's interesting about these three elevations of impact is they enable us to find meaning in any job if we approach it the right way. And it shows how accessible purpose can be when we take responsibility for it in our work," says Hurst. Aaron Hurst is a globally recognized entrepreneur who works to create communities that are empowered to realize their potential. He is the CEO of Imperative, a B Corp advocating for Purpose-Oriented Workers and supporting the organizations that embrace them. Hurst is the author of The Purpose Economy (2014) and a regular advisor and thought partner for many global brands. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Michio Kaku: 99.99% of species go extinct. What is humanity’s future? Michio Kaku: 99.99% of species go extinct. What is humanity’s future?
4 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Mother Nature and the laws of physics have a death warrant out for humanity, says Michio Kaku. Can we escape it? - The great science fiction writer Isaac Asimov put a terrifying question on humanity's radar: Where will we be 50,000 years from now? - Humanity is close to exhausting the known laws of physics; it's the unknown – the unified theory of everything – that could dominate our destiny in the coming millennia. And that destiny is almost certainly tied to space travel. Why? - "Extinction is the norm," says Michio Kaku, 99.99% of all species on Earth eventually go extinct. "Mother Nature and the laws of physics have a death warrant for humanity," says Kaku. "[U]ltimately our destiny will be in outer space." Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). His latest book is "The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth" (https://amzn.to/2N8dQ3G) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/99-99-of-species-go-extinct-what-is-humanitys-future Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to fix America’s broken higher education system | Lumina Prize winner Greater Commons How to fix America’s broken higher education system | Lumina Prize winner Greater Commons
5 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Todd McLeod, the founder of Greater Commons (https://greatercommons.com), has a 12-step plan to transform higher education in the U.S., improve our lives, and improve society. - Half of all students who begin their higher education journey drop out, 68 percent of Americans never attain a higher education degree, and 73 percent of Americans go into fields unrelated to their higher education degree. - Clearly, something is wrong with how we approach higher education. In turn, this approach contributes to societal ills, like unrealized contributions to humanity, unrealized potential, debt, despair, and pessimism. -Professor and founder of Greater Commons Todd McLeod has a twelve-step plan designed to revolutionize higher education in the U.S. to ensure that the higher education system can keep pace with the rapidly changing world. Todd McLeod is the founder of Greater Commons, an online learning platform where individuals can learn and teach new skills. He has also worked as a tenured professor in California, teaching multiple disciplines such as business, information systems, computer science, and online education. In 2019, Lumina Foundation and Big Think teamed up to create the Lumina Prize (https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/lumina-prize-for-education-startups), a search to find the most innovative and scalable ideas in post-secondary education. You can see the winners of the Lumina Prize here: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/education-prize-winners Congratulations to PeerForward and Greater Commons! Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/american-higher-education-is-in-crisis-heres-a-plan-to-revolutionize-it If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How Silicon Valley went from Republican to Democrat | Margaret O’Mara How Silicon Valley went from Republican to Democrat | Margaret O’Mara
6 days ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Silicon Valley started as a Republican stronghold. How did it turn so liberal? - From its inception right up until the 1980s, Silicon Valley, and particularly its leaders, were Republican leaning. Dave Packard, cofounder of Hewlett-Packard, was Richard Nixon's deputy secretary of defense. - This trend changes in the 1990s, when the techie generation who came of age during the Vietnam War and Watergate represent a more cynical and liberal class of leaders. In 1984, Steve Jobs admitted he'd never voted. - In the late '80s and '90s, politicians like Bill Clinton, Al Gore, and Newt Gingrich start sitting down and talking with futurists, supercomputing specialists, and Turing Prize winners to understand how this world is evolving and how the innovative energy Silicon Valley could be harnessed to bring America into the 21st century. Margaret O’Mara is the author of "The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America." (https://amzn.to/2MiUSrg) She is a professor of history at the University of Washington, where she writes and teaches about the history of U.S. politics, the growth of the high-tech economy, and the connections between the two. https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews:https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-silicon-valley-went-from-conservative-to-anti-establishment-to-liberal Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Do aliens exist? If they did, would we know? | NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller Do aliens exist? If they did, would we know? | NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge We still don't have proof of intelligent life beyond that on Earth. - One of the biggest questions is whether we are alone in the universe — could there be other intelligent life, besides us, out there? Currently, we don't have any evidence aliens exist. - There may have been a chance for a civilization to start billions of years before life began on Earth — one that is far more advanced, technologically speaking, than us. However, they're not making it very obvious. We have no proof of this. - If such an advanced civilization exists, though, it probably relies on solar energy to fuels its everyday activities. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. For more information, visit NASA.gov If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Immigration: Why the well-meaning ‘successful immigrant’ narrative is faulty | Adam Waytz Immigration: Why the well-meaning ‘successful immigrant’ narrative is faulty | Adam Waytz
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge We tend to promote foreigners by broadcasting their economic values, instead of their intrinsic humanity. - There's a tendency to fight dehumanizing narratives about immigrants and refugees with stories about how much value they have to the United States, in terms of economic and academic achievements and abilities. - Though these counternarratives might come from a good place, Adam Waytz doesn't believe they "really consider people in terms of human dignity." They fail to call out immigrants and refugees inherent dignity. - The image of the deceased Aylan Kurdi washed ashore evoked immense sympathy for refugees. Besides showcasing their economic values, it highlighted their shared humanity. Adam Waytz is an award-winning social psychologist and associate professor at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Harvard Business Review, the Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. He is the first person to receive twice the Theoretical Innovation Prize from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. He is also the winner of the SAGE Young Scholar Award and the International Social Cognition Network’s Early Career Award. His latest book is "The Power of Human: How Our Shared Humanity Can Help Us Create a Better World” (https://amzn.to/31s1EP8) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/adam-waytz-immigration Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
The incredible history of the 2nd Amendment and America’s gun violence problem | Jill Lepore The incredible history of the 2nd Amendment and America’s gun violence problem | Jill Lepore
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Gun safety laws have a historical precedent in the 1939 court case U.S. v Miller. - In 1765, the Britain Parliament passed a Stamp Act, but people in New England rebelled against it. In response to this, the king sent two regimens of the British army to Boston to occupy the city. They were much despised by Bostonians, and this occuptation led to the Boston Massacre in 1770. Since then, many have interpreted the Second Amendment to mean the right of the people to bear arms to aid them in a possible insurrection against the government. - The Supreme Court in 1939 in U.S. v Miller, decided unanimously that gun safety laws are perfectly constitutional — the justices declared that the Second Amendment does not protect the rights of an individual to carry firearms. They said the Second Amendment protects the right of people to form militias, or to participate in the common defense. - According to many historians, bearing arms evokes a military use for the common defense — not for shooting rabbits or for the insurrection against one's government. It seems the purpose of the law is to allow citizens to participate in defense of the country against a common enemy. Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper '41 Professor of American History at Harvard University. She is also a staff writer at The New Yorker. A prize-winning professor, she teaches classes in evidence, historical methods, humanistic inquiry, and American history. Much of her scholarship explores absences and asymmetries in the historical record, with a particular emphasis on the histories and technologies of evidence and of privacy. As a wide-ranging and prolific essayist, Lepore writes about American history, law, literature, and politics. She is the author of many award-winning books. Her latest book is These Truths: A History of the United States (https://amzn.to/2MWB5gN) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/jill-lepore-guns Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Smart drugs: All-natural brain enhancers made by mother nature | Dave Asprey Smart drugs: All-natural brain enhancers made by mother nature | Dave Asprey
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Can nicotine keep Alzheimer's at bay? Dave Asprey explains how natural drugs can create super humans. - Nootropics are colloquially known as 'smart drugs' – substances that increase cognitive function in healthy people. The word nootropic is a combination of two Greek words, noos meaning 'mind' and tropein meaning 'towards'. - Dave Asprey discusses two naturally occurring smart drugs: Caffeine and nicotine. The latter might be a surprise, but while smoking, chewing tobacco and vaping have negative health consequences, there's evidence to suggest microdosing one milligram of nicotine, about 5% to 10% of a cigarette's worth, may protect against Alzheimer's. - Beyond naturally occurring smart drugs, Asprey discusses aniracetam, a pharmaceutical cognitive enhancer pioneered in Russia that may improve memory input and recall. Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur, professional biohacker, the New York Times bestselling author of Game Changers, Head Strong and The Bulletproof Diet, the creator of Bulletproof Coffee, and the host of Bulletproof Radio, the Webby Award–winning, number one–ranked podcast. His new book is Super Human The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever (2019).https://amzn.to/2YWWWXV If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Automated trucks: Blue-collar disaster or economic win? | Andrew Yang Automated trucks: Blue-collar disaster or economic win? | Andrew Yang
1 week ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Why Silicon Valley wants to automate 3.5 million blue-collar truck drivers out of existence. - There are 3.5 million truck drivers in the U.S.; it's the most common job in 29 states. Yet there is a $168 billion financial incentive for Silicon Valley to automate truck drivers. - The pros? Automation will lower the 4,000-person annual death toll caused by truck collisions, and it will save companies and consumers money. - The cons? Truck drivers with families to support and loans to pay will soon have to compete with a robot truck that doesn't need to sleep. That kind of economic hardship doesn't exist in a vacuum; it will ripple outward in unexpected ways. Andrew Yang is an entrepreneur and author who is running for President as a Democrat in 2020. In his book The War on Normal People: The Truth About America's Disappearing Jobs and Why Universal Basic Income Is Our Future (https://amzn.to/2YRhW6l), he explains the mounting crisis of the automation of labor and makes the case for the Freedom Dividend, a Universal Basic Income of $1,000 a month for every American as well as other policies to progress to the next stage of capitalism. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Getting 16.4 million people better post-secondary education? Lumina Foundation has a plan for that. Getting 16.4 million people better post-secondary education? Lumina Foundation has a plan for that.
1 week ago En
Lumina Foundation wants to help 16.4 million people get a quality credential by 2025, and they're looking for entrepreneurs with the vision to help realize that goal. - Lumina Foundation's goal is to help people across the U.S. get a quality post-secondary education. - To do that, they're providing grants, helping to shape policy, and they're investing in innovative entrepreneurs through the Lumina Impact Ventures program. - They are looking to partner with entrepreneurs who are dedicated to helping students gain a fulfilling post-secondary education and for whom Lumina Foundation can be a strong value-add partner. - Lumina Foundation is partnering with entrepreneurs with innovative ideas to improve our education system through Lumina Impact Ventures, and why Big Think is helping them find the best ideas about the future of learning and work. - You can see the winners of the Lumina Prize here - congratulations to PeerForward and Greater Commons! https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/education-prize-winners Elizabeth Garlow is Lumina's impact investment officer. She most recently served as a community solutions fellow and domestic policy advisor at The White House during the Obama Administration, where she managed the President's Promise Zones initiative, working closely with local leaders to create jobs, improve educational outcomes, reduce crime and support overall economic growth. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more here: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/lumina-foundation-education Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Keeping democracy alive: Whistleblowing, civil disobedience, and discourse | Allison Stanger Keeping democracy alive: Whistleblowing, civil disobedience, and discourse | Allison Stanger
1 week ago En
From the Revolutionary War, to Rosa Parks and #MeToo, whistleblowing and civil disobedience are in America's DNA. - The first U.S. whistleblower protection law was passed unanimously in 1778 in response to the misconduct of Navy Commodore Esek Hopkins. - Whistleblowing and civil disobedience are tools of discourse that keep elites honest and protect democracy. - The difference? Whistleblowers are insiders who expose improper conduct to the authorities or to the press. Civil disobedience starts with outsiders whose actions slowly gain popular support, which then catalyzes change. Allison Stanger is the Russell Leng ’60 Professor of International Politics and Economics at Middlebury College, a New America Cybersecurity Fellow, and an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is also the author of "One Nation Under Contract: The Outsourcing of American Power and the Future of Foreign Policy" and has contributed to Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Financial Times, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, USA Today, U.S. News and World Report, and The Washington Post. Her latest book, "Whistleblowers: Honesty in America from Washington to Trump" is available for pre-order (https://amzn.to/2YtTIja) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/whistleblowing Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/whistleblowing Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Writing a will: What to leave behind after you die | BJ Miller Writing a will: What to leave behind after you die | BJ Miller
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge It may be an uncomfortable thing to do, but creating a will can save your loved ones a lot of headaches after you're gone. - A will is not a simple, one-piece-of-paper kind of document. There are many different kinds of wills: There's a will to handle your things. There's a will to handle your body. And there are wills to handle your legacy. - If you don't prepare a will, and if you don't set up a trust, and if you don't arrange your advance directives, then you, and your loved ones, fall into these default legal mechanisms that aren't necessarily always commonsensical. - In ethical wills, which are gaining popularity today, deceased individuals pass along tips of wisdom or things they've learned to those who survive them — this is an opportunity for them to pass along the narrative of how they say life, what they thought of themselves and others, and what they hope for their loved ones. BJ Miller, MD, is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco where he practices and teaches palliative medicine. He has been profiled in The New York Times Magazine, and interviewed on Super Soul Sunday, The Tim Ferriss Show, and On Being with Krista Tippett, and has spoken at the Aspen Ideas Festival and around the world. Miller’s relationship with palliative care stems from an accident while an undergraduate at Princeton – an electric shock was nearly fatal and required the amputation of three limbs. He is the co-author of A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death (https://amzn.to/2SABQwN) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
The best hospitals have more superbugs. Do patients have a right to know? | Matt McCarthy The best hospitals have more superbugs. Do patients have a right to know? | Matt McCarthy
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge The premier hospitals tend to have the most superbugs — they also have the best experts. - Many of the best hospitals also have superbugs within their walls. - One medical dilemma is whether to tell patients about a superbug's presence: will it inhibit them from seeking care? -The best hospitals may have the most superbugs, but they also have the experts who know how to treat patients sickened by bacteria, and possess some of the most powerful antibiotics around. Matt McCarthy, MD, graduated from Harvard Medical School and went on to complete his internal medicine residency at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the author of two national bestsellers, "The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly" and "Odd Man Out." His newest book, "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic" is on-sale now (https://amzn.to/2Kv90dJ). McCarthy is also an assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell and a staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to suffer like a total pro: Comedian Pete Holmes on ego, judgment, and feeling special How to suffer like a total pro: Comedian Pete Holmes on ego, judgment, and feeling special
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Suffering can buffer us, and make us more polished versions of ourselves — if we have the right attitude. - When you're going through a moment that tests your patience, even causes you to psychologically suffer, sometimes you have to step back and say, "Yes, thank you." - Suffering is like sandpaper, and, if we choose, it can buffer us and make us better versions of ourselves. - Also, it's critical to find a quiet place within where just the fundamental fact that you are participating in reality imbues you with enough value and dignity to draw upon at any moment. Regardless of exterior sentiments about you. Pete Holmes is a comedian, writer, cartoonist, "Christ-leaning spiritual seeker", and podcast host. His wildly popular podcast, You Made It Weird, is a comedic exploration of the meaning of life with guests ranging from Deepak Chopra and Elizabeth Gilbert to Seth Rogen and Garry Shandling. He is the author of "Comedy Sex God" (https://amzn.to/2yQPPWB) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Sleep hacking: How to control your mitochondrial clocks | Dave Asprey Sleep hacking: How to control your mitochondrial clocks | Dave Asprey
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Light controls your body clock. Hack it to get better sleep. - You can go a month without food, or three or four days without water, but try to go three or four days without sleep. "It's at least as important as water. But you don't see people going on water diets very often, but you do see people who just don't get enough sleep all the time," says Dave Asprey - Quality sleep is foundational to good health, helping to ward off diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer's. It's also a key strategy for anti-aging. - Dave Asprey shares what he's learned about sleep hacking: Don't eat after the sun goes down, turn the lights down as much as you can after the sun goes down, and black out your room – you'll need more than regular black-out curtains. Watch the video to find out why. Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur, professional biohacker, the New York Times bestselling author of Game Changers, Head Strong and The Bulletproof Diet, the creator of Bulletproof Coffee, and the host of Bulletproof Radio, the Webby Award–winning, number one–ranked podcast. His new book is Super HumanThe Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever (https://amzn.to/31mhXNv) Read more here: https://bigthink.com/videos/get-better-sleep If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Computing history: From government secrets to a failed tech utopia Computing history: From government secrets to a failed tech utopia
2 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Historian Maragaret O'Mara explains why a tech utopia was, and still might be, a pipe dream. - Elon Musk isn't the first technologist to worry about robot overlords. The early computers of the '40s and '50s were referred to as electronic brains, and people regarded them with fascination and fear. -Until the 1960s, computing power was wielded only by corporations and the government. Then, out of the 1960s counterculture rose a generation of technologists with a techno-utopic vision: Give everyone a personal computer as a tool for empowerment and enlightenment, rather than being siloed machines of government secrets and war. - The personal computing movement thought technology would solve inequality, racism, and war – but as we now know, it did not. History seems to suggest that humans, not tech alone, must be the agents of change. Margaret O’Mara is the author of "The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America" (https://amzn.to/2LZJ3pU) She is a professor of history at the University of Washington, where she writes and teaches about the history of U.S. politics, the growth of the high-tech economy, and the connections between the two. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
College education is still a class luxury in America. PeerForward is changing that. | Aloysia Jean College education is still a class luxury in America. PeerForward is changing that. | Aloysia Jean
2 weeks ago En
Like it or not, most jobs still require some kind of secondary degree. PeerForward (https://www.peerforward.org) is working with low-income communities to ensure that students aren't excluded based on their zip code. - More than two-thirds of American jobs require some kind of secondary education. Unfortunately, kids growing up in a low-income area simply do not have the same resources as wealthier areas when it comes to applying for college or making it to graduation. - PeerForward works with students in low-income areas to get them into college by helping them identify their target college, find and apply for financial aid, and consider how their choice of major connects to their future career. - PeerForward now is expanding onto college campuses to help students persist to earning a degree. The organization hopes to reach 10,000 college students by 2024. - PeerForward is a winner of the Lumina Prize. Discover what they're about here: http://bit.ly/2YmFd0L Aloysia “AJ” Jean is a communities engagement specialist at PeerForward, where she is focused on creating and implementing innovative solutions for college access and college persistence programs serving low-income and first-generation students. AJ is a PeerForward Alumna 2011. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/college-low-income Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Rules for civil engagement: How to talk with someone unlike yourself | Jon Zimmerman Rules for civil engagement: How to talk with someone unlike yourself | Jon Zimmerman
2 weeks ago En
Here are some practical ways to disagree and get along with someone at the same time. - There are a basic set of rules you can use when talking with someone who believes different things than you do, says Jonathan Zimmerman. - Statements like, "You're a blankety-blank" close discussions rather than open them. Instead, say, "You know, that's interesting. That's not the way I see it. Tell me more about why you think that." Being more open about your intentions can help, too. Tell the person that you see the issue from a different angle, and ask them what they think of your view. - A key rule for civil discourse, especially in this political climate, is to recognize the difference between emotion and argument. The depth of conviction with which something is said is not a substitute for argument quality or truth. Jonathan Zimmerman is Professor of History of Education at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. A former Peace Corps volunteer and high school social studies teacher, Zimmerman is the author of Campus Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know and six other books. He is also a frequent contributor to The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New York Review of Books, and other popular periodicals. His latest is The Case for Contention: Teaching Controversial Issues in American Schools (https://amzn.to/2ZnAZ5j) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/rules-for-civil-engagement-how-to-talk-with-someone-unlike-yourself Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/
Добавлена Учить
What proof is there that the universe is evolving? | Michelle Thaller What proof is there that the universe is evolving? | Michelle Thaller
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Stargazing is a form of time travel. - Light moves at 186,000 miles per second. - As fast as light speed is, when you think about how large the universe is, light takes time — a lot of time — to actually get to us from distant objects. - The sun is about 93 million miles away. At 186,000 miles per second, it takes about eight minutes for its light to reach us here on Earth. Because of this, when you look up at the sun, with eye protection, you're actually seeing the star as it was nearly 10 minutes ago — not as it is in real time. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/michelle-thaller-2639494132 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How your immortal consciousness will travel the universe | Michio Kaku How your immortal consciousness will travel the universe | Michio Kaku
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Someday we'll beam to the moon for afternoon tea, and be back in New York for dinner. - In about 100 years, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku believes we'll explore the universe as pure consciousness — traveling at the speed of light, looking at asteroids, comets, meteors, and eventually the stars. "All of this within the laws of physics," he says. - Through recent brain imaging, we know know that the prefrontal cortex of teenagers is fully formed. This induces them to take risks. Also, when guys who talk with pretty girls, we also know it's that blood drains from their brains. Well, their prefrontal cortex. This makes them liable to act "mentally retarded." - The Connectome Project will map the entire brain in about 100 years. Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). His latest book is The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Eart (https://amzn.to/2Ydy6r8) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/michio-kaku-2639431116 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Is panpsychism accurate? Modern physics delivers a reality check. | Dr. Susan Schneider Is panpsychism accurate? Modern physics delivers a reality check. | Dr. Susan Schneider
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If philosophers don't try to mesh their long-held views with new scientific insights, then we have a problem. - According to panpsychists, all of reality is infused with experience. In other words, the fundamental ingredient of reality, they believe, has the felt quality of experience in it. - In this view, the reason that we humans are conscious is that we're configured based on these fundamental experiential ingredients. - If philosophers don't try to mesh their long-held views with what we're discovering from good science, then we have a problem. For instance, panpsychism may be due for for update: panprotopsychism, a view that says as these fundamental ingredients combine, they give rise to conscious experience and that those fundamental ingredients are "quasimental." Dr. Susan Schneider is the NASA/Baruch Blumberg Chair at the Library of Congress and NASA and the director of the AI, Mind and Society Group at the University of Connecticut. Her work has been featured by the New York Times, Scientific American, Smithsonian, Fox TV, History Channel, and more. Her two-year NASA project explored superintelligent AI. Previously, she was at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton devising tests for AI consciousness. Her books include The Language of Thought, The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness, and Science Fiction and Philosophy. Her latest, Artificial You: AI and the Future of Your Mind, is available for pre-order: https://amzn.to/32VYJ2L If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/susan-schneider Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to optimize your gut and brain bacteria | Dave Asprey How to optimize your gut and brain bacteria | Dave Asprey
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge What you eat – and when – can make you superhuman. - The importance of the microbiome has really come to the fore in the last five years. Viome, a company that analyzed the feces of 100,000 people, has discovered 10,000 new types of gut bacteria. - Additionally, Improved imaging technology led scientists to discover you don't have just one microbiome, you have two. The second one is in your brain, populated by the same bacteria that live in your gut. - Simple habits can foster healthy gut and brain bacteria, which can help you live longer and age more slowly. Eat mostly vegetables, take fiber and prebiotics, and practice intermittent fasting, says Dave Asprey. Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur, professional biohacker, the New York Times bestselling author of Game Changers, Head Strong and The Bulletproof Diet, the creator of Bulletproof Coffee, and the host of Bulletproof Radio, the Webby Award–winning, number one–ranked podcast. His new book, available for pre-order, is Super Human The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever (https://amzn.to/2K5Gmjm) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/healthier-microbiome Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to study better and avoid a test-day disaster | David Epstein How to study better and avoid a test-day disaster | David Epstein
3 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Want to learn better? Here's a lesson from cognitive psychology. - Getting hints makes students feel like they're learning, but a cognitive psychology study on monkeys, specifically on two rhesus macaques called Oberon and MacDuff, has proven that getting hints backfires when it comes to test day. - If you're relying on outside help, you're not employing what's called the 'generation effect'. The generation effect refers to the mental effort of generating an answer, which actually primes your brain for learning. - How can you study better? Test yourself before you're ready, and know that learning is supposed to be frustrating and difficult. If if feels too easy, it might be a sign you're not generating independent answers. David Epstein is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Range: Why Generalist Triumph in a Specialized World (https://amzn.to/2xzQJ90) and The Sports Gene. He has master's degrees in environmental science and journalism and has worked as an investigative reporter for ProPublica and a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. He lives in Washington, DC. premiere If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
You can crowdsource innovation. Here’s how Lumina does it. | Elizabeth Garlow You can crowdsource innovation. Here’s how Lumina does it. | Elizabeth Garlow
3 weeks ago En
What are the best ideas out there to innovate our rapidly changing education system? The Lumina Foundation has partnered with Big Think to find them. - The conventional model of innovation involves piloting a product, scaling it, and then mainstreaming it. - However, the Lumina Foundation believes that this model won't work quite so well for education: Instead, rapidly prototyping and iterating different ideas is the likely the best way to create a more equitable education system for our rapidly changing society. - That's why the Lumina Foundation is partnering with entrepreneurs with innovative ideas to improve our education system through Lumina Impact Ventures, and why Big Think is helping them find the best ideas about the future of learning and work. - You can see the winners of the Lumina Prize here: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/education-prize-winners – Congratulations to PeerForward and Greater Commons! Elizabeth Garlow is Lumina's impact investment officer. She most recently served as a community solutions fellow and domestic policy advisor at The White House during the Obama Administration, where she managed the President's Promise Zones initiative, working closely with local leaders to create jobs, improve educational outcomes, reduce crime and support overall economic growth. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Lumina-Foundation/education-prize-winners Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Have you accidentally offended someone? Here’s advice for you and them. | Allison Stanger Have you accidentally offended someone? Here’s advice for you and them. | Allison Stanger
3 weeks ago En
Here's what to say in an era where many people are too afraid to say anything. - In a diverse world, we run the risk of accidentally saying something that will offend someone. That does not mean you should automatically be disqualified from continuing in the discussion. We cannot have a 'one strike you're out' reaction, says Allison Stanger. - If you offend someone inadvertently, it's extremely important that you apologize and say 'That was not my intention.' Apologizing is the foundation for being able to move forward, and if the offense caused was accidental, there's no reason not to apologize. - If you are the person who has been offended, realize that people make mistakes when they think out loud and engage in discourse. We cannot stamp out implicit biases but people can grow self-aware and learn from their mistakes. Try to be more generous to people who accidentally offend you. Allison Stanger is the Russell Leng ’60 Professor of International Politics and Economics at Middlebury College, a New America Cybersecurity Fellow, and an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is also the author of "One Nation Under Contract: The Outsourcing of American Power and the Future of Foreign Policy" and has contributed to Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Financial Times, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, USA Today, U.S. News and World Report, and The Washington Post. Her latest book is "Whistleblowers: Honesty in America from Washington to Trump, coming out Sept https://amzn.to/2M7Buwu Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Grief isn’t a pathology. It’s an altered state of mind. | BJ Miller, MD Grief isn’t a pathology. It’s an altered state of mind. | BJ Miller, MD
4 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - When it comes to moving forward, the slightly harder path — but in the long run, the way easier path — would be for us to develop the skill of grieving. - Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's theories about the five stages may be off, but she gave us a lens from which to come to understand the process of grieving. - The fact that you grieve is a testimony to your love. BJ Miller, MD, is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco where he practices and teaches palliative medicine. He has been profiled in The New York Times Magazine, and interviewed on Super Soul Sunday, The Tim Ferriss Show, and On Being with Krista Tippett, and has spoken at the Aspen Ideas Festival and around the world. Miller’s relationship with palliative care stems from an accident while an undergraduate at Princeton – an electric shock was nearly fatal and required the amputation of three limbs. He is the co-author of A Beginner's Guide to the End: Practical Advice for Living Life and Facing Death (https://amzn.to/2SABQwN) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/grief Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Silicon Valley: How Stanford, science, and war made tech history | Margaret O'Mara Silicon Valley: How Stanford, science, and war made tech history | Margaret O'Mara
4 weeks ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge The history of Silicon Valley: The rise of a technological unicorn. - In the first part of the 20th century, Silicon Valley wasn't known as the "Silicon Valley." It was the "Santa Clara Valley." It was an agricultural region, best known for being the "Prune Capital of America. - In terms of getting its start, Sherman Fairchild created Fairchild Semiconductor in the area because he had inherited a lot of money from IBM stock. In this way, IBM is sort of the granddaddy of all computer companies because of this. - Remaking another Silicon Valley in the world would be tough — but not impossible. The region has become what it is today because it succeeded in a certain kind of time. Margaret O’Mara is the author of THE CODE: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America (https://amzn.to/2M6c7Lx). She is a professor of history at the University of Washington, where she writes and teaches about the history of U.S. politics, the growth of the high-tech economy, and the connections between the two. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/silicon-valley Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
The problem with problem solving? It isn’t ridiculous enough. | Dan Seewald The problem with problem solving? It isn’t ridiculous enough. | Dan Seewald
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Ask very silly questions to spur very serious innovation. - To get really innovative solutions to complex problems, you need to abandon logic, says Dan Seewald. - Asking provocative and ridiculous 'what if?' questions pushes us down lateral paths of thinking versus the vertical or logical path. The latter approach is practical but it doesn't break new ground. - Breaking with tradition through lateral thinking allows us to solve really serious problems, from climate change to political turmoil. Or, as Dan Seewald explains, it could just help you solve all your laundry headaches. Dan Seewald is the founder and CEO of Deliberate Innovation and designer of the Deliberate Innovation System™, which combines rigorous innovation techniques with the inspirational practices used in coaching high-performance athletes. He did his graduate studies at New York University in political economy and entrepreneurship and has a B.S. in Accounting from the College of New Jersey. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
The biggest threat to America? Americans. | Jared Diamond The biggest threat to America? Americans. | Jared Diamond
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Pulitzer Prize-winner Jared Diamond explains why some nations make it through epic crises and why others fail. - "A country is not going to resolve a national crisis unless it acknowledges that it's in a crisis," says Jared Diamond. "If you don't, you're going to get nowhere. Many Americans still don't recognize today that the United States is descending into a crisis." - The U.S. tends to focus on "bad countries" like China, Canada and Mexico as the root of its problems, however Diamond points out the missing piece: Americans are generating their own problems. - The crisis the U.S. is experiencing is not cause for despair. The U.S. has survived many tragedies, such as the War of Independence and the Great Depression – history is proof that the U.S. can get through this current crisis too. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/the-biggest-threat-to-america-americans Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Where the evidence of fake news is really hiding | Eli Pariser Where the evidence of fake news is really hiding | Eli Pariser
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge When it comes to sniffing out whether a source is credible or not, even journalists can sometimes take the wrong approach. - We all think that we're competent consumers of news media, but the research shows that even journalists struggle with identifying fact from fiction. - When judging whether a piece of media is true or not, most of us focus too much on the source itself. Knowledge has a context, and it's important to look at that context when trying to validate a source. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Eli Pariser has dedicated his career to figuring out how technology can elevate important topics in the world. He is the co-founder of Upworthy and bestselling author of The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You (https://amzn.to/2Z4LM4s) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/identify-fake-news Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Become an intellectual explorer: Master the art of conversation | Emily Chamlee-Wright Become an intellectual explorer: Master the art of conversation | Emily Chamlee-Wright
1 month ago En
Want to be smarter than you were yesterday? Learn to have better conversations using these 3 design principles. - What is a great conversation? They are the ones that leave us feeling smarter or more curious, with a sense that we have discovered something, understood something about another person, or have been challenged. - There are 3 design principles that lead to great conversations: humility, critical thinking, and sympathetic listening. - Critical thinking is the celebrated cornerstone of liberalism, but next time you're in a challenging and rewarding conversation, try to engage sympathetic listening too. Understanding why another intelligent person holds ideas that are at odds with your own is often more enlightening than merely hunting for logic errors. Dr. Emily Chamlee-Wright is the president and CEO of the Institute for Humane Studies, which supports and partners with scholars working within the classical liberal tradition. She was previously Provost and Dean at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. Prior to joining Washington College, she was Elbert Neese Professor of Economics and Associate Dean at Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/master-conversation If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Moon mission 2.0: What humanity will learn by going back to the Moon | Michelle Thaller Moon mission 2.0: What humanity will learn by going back to the Moon | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Going back to the moon will give us fresh insights about the creation of our solar system. - July 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the moon landing — Apollo 11. - Today, we have a strong scientific case for returning to the moon: the original rock samples that we took from the moon revolutionized our view of how Earth and the solar system formed. We could now glean even more insights with fresh, nonchemically-altered samples. - NASA plans to send humans to a crater in the South Pole of the moon because it's safer there, and would allow for better communications with people back on Earth. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/nasa-moon Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Climate change: A slow-burn existential threat | Jon Gertner Climate change: A slow-burn existential threat | Jon Gertner
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - There are islands in the Chesapeake Bay that have already succumbed to sea level rise, one of them is Holland Island. - Even in a best case scenario, the consensus is that we'll get at least two feet of sea level rise by the year 2100. - One big question is: What will happen when flooding gets worse and worse and people decide there's no hope for them anymore to live in their respective towns. Jon Gertner is a journalist and historian whose stories on science, technology, and nature have appeared in a host of national magazines. Since 2003 he has worked mainly as a feature writer for the New York Times Magazine. His first book, The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, was a New York Times bestseller. His latest is The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey into Greenland's Buried Past and Our Perilous Future (https://amzn.to/2L917gH) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/climate-change-2639195938 Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How doctors really decide who lives and who dies | Matt McCarthy How doctors really decide who lives and who dies | Matt McCarthy
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Should doctors allow their expertise to trump patient's personal goals — or should they yield to it? - Our health care system right now prizes efficiency, rather than embedding an ethics committee throughout a patient's treatment. - The challenge of being a medical ethicist is bringing "airy" concepts into clinical practice. - Sometimes the solutions to ethical issues become established via legal precedent. Matt McCarthy, MD, graduated from Harvard Medical School and went on to complete his internal medicine residency at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the author of two national bestsellers, "The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly" and "Odd Man Out." His newest book, "Superbugs," is on-sale now. (https://amzn.to/2XRroSS) McCarthy is also an assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell and a staff physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Want a shortcut to better living? Psychedelics may be it. | Michael Pollan Want a shortcut to better living? Psychedelics may be it. | Michael Pollan
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge - Tripping on psychedelics may turn banal insights into "sticky" and "revealed truths" that change the way we live our lives. - For instance, LSD may be able to help smokers cut their addiction. How so? By allowing them to have a perspective shift on its effects. - Sometimes the insights made during psychotherapy, after years of counseling, can be made with an LSD trip in a single afternoon. Michael Pollan is the author of How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence (https://amzn.to/32tYc7I) and seven previous books including Cooked, Food Rules, In Defense of Food, The Omnivore's Dilemma and The Botany of Desire, which received the Borders Original Voices Award for the best non-fiction work of 2001, and was recognized as a best book of the year by the American Booksellers Association and Amazon.com. PBS premiered a two-hour special documentary based on The Botany of Desire in fall 2009. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How neuroscience shows the highs and lows of humanity | Adam Waytz How neuroscience shows the highs and lows of humanity | Adam Waytz
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Here's what neuroscience and psychology have to say about how people humanize and dehumanize one another. - When humans think about other humans versus inanimate objects, that difference can be seen in activated brain regions on fMRI scans. - Studies reveal that those brain regions don't light up equally when we look at all people – we tend to humanize some people and dehumanize others when we see things like homelessness, drug addiction, different ethnicities or someone in an outgroup. - On the other hand, humanization can be increased by something seemingly trivial: human touch. Studies show that NBA teams who touch more on the court play better together, and that the touch of a loved one can reduce pain. Adam Waytz is an award-winning social psychologist and associate professor at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Harvard Business Review, the Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. He is the first person to receive twice the Theoretical Innovation Prize from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. He is also the winner of the SAGE Young Scholar Award and the International Social Cognition Network’s Early Career Award. His latest book is "The Power of Human: How Our Shared Humanity Can Help Us Create a Better World" (https://amzn.to/32pz3LC) If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/how-neuroscience-shows-the-highs-and-lows-of-humanity Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
What do mentors do? They introduce you to your future self. | Bishop Omar Jahwar What do mentors do? They introduce you to your future self. | Bishop Omar Jahwar
1 month ago En
Bishop Omar Jahwar explains that before mentors can inspire others, they have to be inspired themselves. - What kind of work does a mentor do? Many expect that mentors can only help others that have been in the same situation as their mentees, but this is not the case. - What matters is that mentors can see their mentees' potential so that they can help them move away from the situation that they are in and towards the person that they actually are. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/mentors Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Michio Kaku: Mental communication and infinite knowledge are on the horizon Michio Kaku: Mental communication and infinite knowledge are on the horizon
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to defeat moral grandstanders (and stay classy while doing it) | Brandon Warmke How to defeat moral grandstanders (and stay classy while doing it) | Brandon Warmke
1 month ago En
These effective strategies can minimize harmful moral grandstanding – in yourself and in others. - What is moral grandstanding? Here's a comprehensive explanation of the psychology that drives this disruptive and divisive online behavior. - Moral grandstanding may have very serious consequences for social discourse, but calling it out and shaming moral grandstanders is unproductive, says Brandon Warmke. - To defeat moral grandstanding, you can do several things. Before posting anything online, ask yourself: 'Am I doing this to do good or am I doing this to look good?'. You can deny attention and praise to moral grandstanders, and you can redirect your own impulse to signal morality into actual volunteer work instead of online posts. Brandon Warmke, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Bowling Green State University. He is currently writing two books, Grandstanding: The Use and Abuse of Moral Talk and Why It’s OK to Mind Your Own Business, both with philosopher Justin Tosi. Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/how-to-defeat-moral-grandstanders-and-stay-classy-while-doing-it If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/sponsored-institute-for-humane-studies/how-to-defeat-moral-grandstanders-and-stay-classy-while-doing-it Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
How to boost your career in a ruthless job market | Neil Irwin How to boost your career in a ruthless job market | Neil Irwin
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Sometimes the way to rise to the top is by moving sideways. - Modern jobs come with a tour of duty expectation — that is, you provide a certain commitment to the employer, and the employer provides a certain commitment to you, but it's not forever. After a few years, results and options are re-evaluated. - Rather than thinking of a career ladder, it's more important in the modern job market to view it as a career lattice — a grid. It's not always about moving up, sometimes it's about moving sideways or even down slightly. Why? That way you can cut across different specialties and see how they fit together. - One of the most important aspects about working at a company isn't just the money you are paid — it's about the experiences they give you and how they set you up for the future. On top of getting a raise, you should be mindful how an employer is trying to help you expand your horizons so that you can rise to the top of the lattice. Neil Irwin is a senior economic correspondent at The New York Times, where he was a founding member of The Upshot, the Times’s site for analytical journalism. He was previously the author of The Alchemists: Three Central Bankers and a World on Fire, a New York Times bestselling account of the global financial crisis and its aftermath that was short-listed for the McKinsey-Financial Times Business Book of the Year award. His latest book is How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World: The Definitive Guide to Adapting and Succeeding in High-Performance Careers https://amzn.to/2JgTFNp If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/stand-out-in-job-market Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Arctic amplification: How the albedo effect speeds up global warming | Jon Gertner Arctic amplification: How the albedo effect speeds up global warming | Jon Gertner
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge The more Greenland melts, the more Greenland melts. Here's why. - The Arctic is currently warming about twice as fast as the rest of the world. - Ice is white and bright and is able to reflect solar energy back into space. When it melts and exposes dark, open ocean, that open ocean absorbs more sunlight and more energy. This creates a kind of feedback loop. - The darkness absorbs more solar energy — more sunlight. In turn, this accelerates the melt of the ice. Jon Gertner is a journalist and historian whose stories on science, technology, and nature have appeared in a host of national magazines. Since 2003 he has worked mainly as a feature writer for the New York Times Magazine. His first book, "The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation", was a New York Times bestseller. His latest is "The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey into Greenland's Buried Past and Our Perilous Future" https://amzn.to/2L917gH If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Superhuman innovators: How experimentation and struggle fuel new ideas | David Epstein Superhuman innovators: How experimentation and struggle fuel new ideas | David Epstein
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Why Django Reinhardt might just be the greatest musical innovator you've never heard of. - David Epstein recounts the incredible life of 20th-century Roma guitarist Django Reinhardt, who couldn't read or write and who suffered a horrific accident that made two of his fret fingers useless. - Reinhardt didn't stop playing, instead he invented a new style that revolutionized the music scene and gave birth to the modern guitar solo, inspiring artists like Jimi Hendrix. - Anyone can innovate, says Epstein, it is in no way dependent on a formal education. In fact, our creative work may fare better if we learn like babies do: through trial, error, and struggle. David Epstein is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Range: Why Generalist Triumph in a Specialized World (https://amzn.to/2xzQJ90) and The Sports Gene. He has master's degrees in environmental science and journalism and has worked as an investigative reporter for ProPublica and a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. He lives in Washington, DC. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Why failing to preserve biodiversity is a profound disrespect | Susan Hockfield Why failing to preserve biodiversity is a profound disrespect | Susan Hockfield
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Here are just two of the practical and philosophical crises surrounding biodiversity breakdown. - A loss of biodiversity limits the ways we can use biodiversity to make our world better. Hockfield reminds us that biodiversity is a "bank account" of natural assistance. - For example, it is key in producing better crops to feed growing populations. How will we double food productivity (which we must do to survive) when we lose the wild plants we crossbreed agricultural crops with? - There is much more to lose than this bank account, however. It is a deep philosophical dilemma that humans have and will continue to wipe out organisms that have struggled their way into existence over the course of 5 billion years. Susan Hockfield is a neuroscientist based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 2004 to 2012, she served as the 16th president of the university. Hockfield was the first woman, and the first life scientist, to lead the institute. Prior to MIT, she worked at Yale University, where she served in myriad capacities. Among them, the William Edward Gilbert Professor of Neurobiology, Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Provost. The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution https://amzn.to/2EfEZMT If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
The only way to “build a wall” without destroying the U.S. | Jared Diamond The only way to “build a wall” without destroying the U.S. | Jared Diamond
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge There's more than one kind of wall that we can build. Building the right kind of wall might even be good for the U.S. - In times of crisis, we often 'build a wall' that separates the part of our lives that feels out of control from the parts that are more in control. - This is healthy and can help us maintain perspective. - Nations, too, build walls during times of crisis. But those walls can't be designed to isolate ourselves from others; rather, they need to delineate what is working and what isn't. Jared Diamond, a noted polymath, is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among his many awards are the U.S. National Medal of Science, Japan's Cosmos Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of the international best-selling books: "Guns, Germs, and Steel"; "Collapse"; "Why Is Sex Fun?"; "The World Until Yesterday"; and "The Third Chimpanzee", and is the presenter of TV documentary series based on three of those books. His latest is "Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis" http://bit.ly/jardiamond If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/american-isolationism Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Understanding what tolerance means in a highly polarized America | Sarah Ruger Understanding what tolerance means in a highly polarized America | Sarah Ruger
1 month ago En
Changing people's minds isn't how we end polarization. Tolerance is the gateway to peaceful coexistence. - The goal of tolerance is not for everyone to arrive at a consensus on divisive issues, or to accept each other's views. Sarah Ruger suggests that tolerance is learning how to coexist peacefully through difference. - Tolerance is a word with a lot of baggage, but tolerance is not patronizing or insulting; it is a starting point for something better. - Peaceful coexistence and a focus on common goals enables people of all convictions to work towards positive social ends like innovation, social progress, and the defense of equal rights. Sarah Ruger directs free expression initiatives for the Charles Koch Institute and Foundation. She is a passionate advocate for open inquiry, free speech rights, and engagement that respects the dignity inherent in every individual. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/Charles-Koch-Foundation/understanding-what-tolerance-means-in-a-highly-polarized-america Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
That black hole photo: How event horizons bend time, space, and light | Michelle Thaller That black hole photo: How event horizons bend time, space, and light | Michelle Thaller
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge The recent photo of a black hole is something extraordinary. Here's why. - Black holes are usually surrounded by disks of very, very bright, very hot material. And that's how we find them. - Black holes themselves give off no radiation at all. Any light gets absorbed into the black hole — all forms of light, from gamma rays to radio waves. - A black hole's gravity is so strong it actually bends space itself. What does this mean? There's no way to get out of the black hole — out of the event horizon — because space and time themselves are bent into the black hole. Dr. Michelle Thaller is an astronomer who studies binary stars and the life cycles of stars. She is Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA. She went to college at Harvard University, completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif. then started working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Spitzer Space Telescope. After a hugely successful mission, she moved on to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in the Washington D.C. area. In her off-hours often puts on about 30lbs of Elizabethan garb and performs intricate Renaissance dances. If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/space Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Michio Kaku: There are 2 types of god. Only one is within the boundary of science. Michio Kaku: There are 2 types of god. Only one is within the boundary of science.
1 month ago En
Give yourself the gift of knowledge — subscribe to Big Think Edge: http://bit.ly/bigthinkedge Does God exist? The answer rests outside the "normal" boundaries of science. - Science is about natural law, while religion is about ethics. As long as you keep these two separate, Kaku says, there's no problem at all. - Problems arise, however, when the natural sciences begin to "pontificate upon ethics" and when religious people begin to pontificate about natural law. - Albert Einstein believed in the "god of Spinoza" — not a personal god, but one who has set order and harmony in the fabric of the universe. "You can put the laws of physics as we know them on a simple sheet of paper — amazing! It didn't have to be that way," says Kaku. - The existence of God is not testable because such a review is not reproducible or falsifiable, as most scientific investigations are. In this sense, Kaku says the question and answer whether God exists rests outside the "normal" boundaries of science. Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, as well as New York University (NYU). His latest book is "The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth" https://amzn.to/314zgD5 If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/rightsholders/bigthink/ Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/god Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Добавлена Учить
Loading...