Deep Look
DEEP LOOK is a science video series that explores big science by going very, very small, from KQED and PBS Digital Studios. We use macro photography and microscopy in glorious 4K resolution, to see science up close ... really, really close. SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Support Deep Look on Patreon!! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook On Twitter: Laura Klivans: Host/Writer @lauraklivans Joshua Cassidy: Lead Producer / Cinematographer @Jkcassidy Teodros Hailye: Animator Jenny Oh: Producer @plattyjo Gabriela Quiros: Coordinating Producer Craig Rosa: Series Producer @craigrosa Seth G. Samuel: Composer @sethgsamuel Kia Simon: Editor and Motion Graphics: @KiaSimon -- KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

134 videos
Firebrats and Silverfish Are Rocking Some Old-School Looks | Deep Look Firebrats and Silverfish Are Rocking Some Old-School Looks | Deep Look
5 days ago En
What *is* that bizarre fishlike thing squirming in your sink at night? Firebrats and silverfish are pretty darn similar to some of the earliest insects on Earth. With three long filaments poking out their back, no wings and mini-me babies, they have something to teach us about survival. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Look closely at the firebrat munching on cereal in your kitchen or getting cozy in a pile of newspapers. You’ll see traits some of the earliest insects had around 400 million years ago. Take its three tail-looking filaments. The two outer ones are called cerci. They work like antennae, detecting chemicals and predators like house centipedes. Other insects, like cockroaches, have a short pair of cerci. But very few insects have the middle filament that firebrats and silverfish possess. Called the median caudal filament, it has tiny hairs that can detect the faintest air currents. --- What do firebrats eat? Cereal, spices and books – both the pages and the glue in the binding. Only a handful of the 500 to 600 species of firebrats and silverfish live with us. In nature, they feed on leaves, stems, needles and bark. “And they will also eat, well, each other,” said entomologist Art Appel from Auburn University. --- Are firebrats dangerous? No, they don’t bite or sting. --- What is the difference between silverfish and firebrats? Silverfish generally prefer cooler parts of the house, while firebrats are drawn to warmer corners, like a water heater – hence their name. --- Does evolution have a goal? When you look at a firebrat, with its ancient traits, you might wonder why it hasn’t changed to be more like other insects. For example, when insects developed wings around 325 million years ago this led to an explosion in insect diversity. So why did firebrats remain wingless, like the earliest insects? “When we see a creature that looks pretty similar to things that were probably living 400 million years ago, we think, ‘Why isn’t that creature doing a better job of being modern?’” said Sandra Schachat, a doctoral student who researches insect evolution at Stanford University. “But the way that evolution works is that it doesn't really have an optimum that things are being driven towards. You don’t need to be the most abundant species in your habitat in order to survive. You only need to be abundant enough that you can maintain some kind of population over time.” ---+ Find additional resources and a transcript on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1972757/firebrats-and-silverfish-are-rocking-some-old-school-looks ---+ More Deep Look episodes: Here’s How That Annoying Fly Dodges Your Swatter https://youtu.be/jBPFCvEhv9Y These Termites Turn Your House into a Palace of Poop https://youtu.be/DYPQ1Tjp0ew ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to these 5 fans on our Community Tab who identified what gives the firebrats and silverfish the ability to digest cellulose - special enzymes! Catto The Steel City Storm The GoldenDunsparce Junior Meren Imchen ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Daniel Weinstein Egg-Roll Karen Reynolds Wild Turkey Josh Kuroda Chris B Emrick dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Allison & Maka Masuda Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Nathan Jewsbury Kelly Hong Kevin Judge Leonhardt Wille Gerardo Alfaro Elizabeth Ann Ditz Laurel Przybylski Mary Truland Sonia Tanlimco Robert Amling Supernovabetty Sayantan Dasgupta Roberta K Wright Joshua Murallon Robertson Cindy McGill Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Carrie Mukaida Aurora monoirre Silvan Rick Wong Levi Cai Syniurge Cristen Rasmussen Carlos Carrasco Misia Clive Kristy Freeman Nicolette Ray Nathan Wright Titania Juang Kallie Moore Caitlin McDonough Scott Faunce SueEllen McCann Noreen Herrington Blanca Vides Teresa Lavell Louis O'Neill Tearra Guice Laura Sanborn Aurora Mitchell Adam Kurtz KW TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, California, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #deeplook #silverfish #firebrat
These Acrobatic Beach Hoppers Shred All Night Long | Deep Look These Acrobatic Beach Hoppers Shred All Night Long | Deep Look
2 weeks ago En
As the sun sets, hordes of tiny crustaceans called beach hoppers –– also known as sand hoppers –– emerge from underground burrows to frolic and feast. They eat so much decaying seaweed and other beach wrack that by morning all that’s left are ghostly outlines in the sand. Watch and Subscribe to PBS Terra: https://www.youtube.com/pbsterra SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt​ DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Night falls, and the beaches come alive with sand hoppers – hungry, jumping shrimp-like creatures that look a lot like giant translucent fleas. No, it’s not a horror movie, and these animals “don’t bite or suck your blood. They’re much more than fleas,” says Jenny Dugan of the Marine Science Institute at UC Santa Barbara. Through her research on sandy beach ecology, Dugan has spent years developing a respect for beach hoppers and their under-appreciated ecological role. The small crustaceans, sometimes as large as two inches, are remarkably in tune with the tides. The mature adult beach hoppers only emerge from their burrows at night when the tide is retreating – which is the best time to find fresh kelp, and less of a risk being seen by predators. Researchers refer to these animals as shredders because they do the necessary work of breaking down and recycling nutrients in beach wrack and kelp, the first step in sending nutrients into the food chain. The presence of sustainable populations of beach hoppers is an indicator of the overall health of a sandy beach ecosystem. --- Where do beach hoppers live? Beach hoppers – also known as sand hoppers – live on sandy beaches in subtropical and temperate zones all over the world. North and South America, Europe, Africa, New Zealand and Australia all have a variety of native species of beach hoppers. On beaches with large amounts of kelp, seagrass and seaweeds washing ashore, you are bound to find sand hoppers too. --- Do beach hoppers bite people? No. Beach hoppers do not bite! They might look like a giant flea, but they aren’t fleas. They are a type of crustacean. Their favorite food is kelp, but they will eat anything that makes up beach wrack – the piles of organic matter that wash ashore on sandy beaches. --- How do beach hoppers know where they are going? Research indicates that some species of beach hoppers use cues from the moon and the sun to orient themselves, and to stay in sync with the ebb and flow cycles of the tides. ---+ Find additional resources and a transcript on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1972559/these-acrobatic-beach-hoppers-shred-all-night-long ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: The Snail-Smashing, Fish-Spearing, Eye-Popping Mantis Shrimp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm1ChtK9QDU California Floater Mussels Take Fish For and Epic Joyride https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7p_w4zE3s4 ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following 5 fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for identifying the parts of the body the beach hopper use to jump - the uropods - abdominal appendages and parts of their tail. // Δ V S T I N // Sourabh Kamat Jared Blake AngryFox07 sushil singh ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Daniel Weinstein Egg-Roll Karen Reynolds Wild Turkey Josh Kuroda Chris B Emrick dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Allison & Maka Masuda Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Nathan Jewsbury Kelly Hong Kevin Judge Leonhardt Wille Gerardo Alfaro Elizabeth Ann Ditz Laurel Przybylski Mary Truland Sonia Tanlimco Robert Amling Supernovabetty Sayantan Dasgupta Roberta K Wright Joshua Murallon Robertson Cindy McGill Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Carrie Mukaida Aurora monoirre Silvan Rick Wong Levi Cai Syniurge Cristen Rasmussen Carlos Carrasco Misia Clive Kristy Freeman Nicolette Ray Nathan Wright Titania Juang Kallie Moore Caitlin McDonough Scott Faunce SueEllen McCann Noreen Herrington Blanca Vides Teresa Lavell Louis O'Neill Tearra Guice Laura Sanborn Aurora Mitchell Adam Kurtz KW TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/​ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience​ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, California, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #beachhopper #sandhopper #deeplook
These Mites Rain Down To Save Your Strawberries | Deep Look These Mites Rain Down To Save Your Strawberries | Deep Look
1 month ago En
Two tiny mites duke it out on strawberry plants throughout California. One is a spider mite that sucks the juices out of the delicious crop and destroys it. The other, persimilis, is a crafty predator that growers drop by the thousands from high-tech drones to protect their fields. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Individual spider mites are barely visible, about the size of a grain of salt, but together they cause huge damage to crops around the world. They suck sap from the leaves and stems of crops and houseplants, leaving yellow or dry rusty leaves and tangles of fine silk. Farmers can use pesticides to knock them back, but spider mites quickly develop resistance, making them particularly stubborn pests. So many farmers turn to biological control agents. One of the most popular is another type of mite commonly called persimilis. This predatory mite hunts down spider mites and their eggs. But spreading the tiny hunters over vast agricultural fields is a challenge, so some growers are turning to companies like Parabug to disperse the predators by air using drones. Now, entomologist Christian Nansen and engineer Zhaodan Kong at UC Davis are looking at ways to automate this entire process of crop protection. They’re developing a strategy using drones armed with special cameras to detect changes in the way sunlight bounces off plants' leaves. Software using machine learning algorithms would then read the subtle changes in the leaves' reflectance and come up with a diagnosis about what was causing the stress. If the system suspects a spider mite infestation it could then summon a second drone, packed with predatory mites. The team is working on developing software to accurately drop the predators right on the trouble areas. “The idea is that these natural predators are like tiny paratroopers coming in on the drones,” said Nansen, “with a special eye in the sky that sees exactly where they need to go.” --- What are spider mites? Spider mites are not insects. They're arachnids, more closely related to spiders and ticks. --- How do I get rid of spider mites? One of the best ways to get rid of spider mites on houseplants and garden crops is to spray the plant with water to knock the mites off. There are pesticides that will kill them, but spider mites have a knack for becoming resistant. Oils are also used to smother the mites. Biological control agents like predatory mites can be particularly effective. ---+ Find additional resources and a transcript on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1972295/these-mites-rain-down-to-save-your-strawberries ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Samurai Wasps Say 'Smell Ya Later, Stink Bugs' | Deep Look https://youtu.be/T8y2XmjdXqw How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks | Deep Look https://youtu.be/_IoOJu2_FKE ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to these 5 fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for identifying the sharp mouthparts of the Persimilis mite - chelicerae! Ivar Golubenko Yann Cohen RandomAlex SARA FATIMA ZeGamingCuber ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Alex Burt Humburg Shebastian Reyes Egg-Roll Daniel Weinstein Josh Kuroda Chris B Emrick Wild Turkey Karen Reynolds dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Nathan Jewsbury Kevin Judge Kelly Hong Robert Amling Laurel Przybylski Gerardo Alfaro Elizabeth Ann Ditz Leonhardt Wille Sonia Tanlimco Mary Truland Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Supernovabetty Sayantan Dasgupta Carrie Mukaida monoirre Joshua Murallon Robertson Cindy McGill Silvan Aurora Rick Wong Roberta K Wright Titania Juang Levi Cai Guillaume Morin Nathan Wright Misia Clive Carlos Carrasco Kristy Freeman Caitlin McDonough Noreen Herrington Blanca Vides Teresa Lavell Cristen Rasmussen Nicolette Ray Dogman Kallie Moore Syniurge Scott Faunce SueEllen McCann Tearra Guice Geidi Rodriguez Louis O'Neill Laura Sanborn Aurora Mitchell KW Adam Kurtz TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, California, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
These Silk-Swinging Caterpillars Will Ruin Your Picnic | Deep Look These Silk-Swinging Caterpillars Will Ruin Your Picnic | Deep Look
1 month ago En
California oak moth caterpillars eat all the leaves on an oak, leaving a brown skeleton. Then they rappel down on a strand of silk, twirling and swinging. If you were enjoying the shade, good luck getting out of their way. For the oak, the caterpillars are a bigger deal –– will the tree survive? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- It’s an event that scientists still can’t explain. Every few years, a light-brown moth native to California seems to appear out of nowhere up and down the state. These California oak moths surround a few trees, usually coast live oaks. Females beat their wings frantically to attract a mate. Once they lay their eggs, the tree is in trouble. Bright-yellow, orange and black caterpillars, known as California oakworms, cover its leaves after a few months. “They will completely devour one tree, while the tree right next to it seems completely untouched,” said Peter Oboyski, executive director of the Essig Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Berkeley. “That suggests that the females are all laying their eggs on the same tree. Is it because they’re attracted to each other? Or is it because this tree is particularly yummy and the tree next to it maybe has too many defensive chemicals? A lot of what’s interesting about this story is all the mystery around it.” --- --- What are those clouds of moths around that oak? In the San Francisco Bay Area, California oak moths emerge in mid-June and in early to mid-October. As the sun sets, you’ll see clouds of them fluttering around an oak, often a coast live oak. Moths lay their white and red eggs on the oak’s leaves or on plants below the tree. The moths that fly in June lay eggs from which caterpillars hatch in early July. The moths that fly in mid-October lay eggs that hatch at the end of the month. These caterpillars develop very slowly over winter and turn into the pupae from which moths will emerge in mid-June. That’s why California oak moths often lay their eggs on coast live oaks so that the evergreen trees can provide foliage for their hungry caterpillars through the winter. --- Should you get rid of California oak moths? Even though it’s harrowing to watch caterpillars defoliate an oak, Oboyski said that healthy trees usually survive the onslaught and grow back their leaves. ---+ Find additional resources and a transcript on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1972082/these-silk-swinging-caterpillars-will-ruin-your-picnic ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Why Is The Very Hungry Caterpillar So Dang Hungry? https://youtu.be/el_lPd2oFV4 It’s a Goopy Mess When Pines and Beetles Duke it Out https://youtu.be/wR5O48zsbnc ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following 5 fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for identifying why the female oak moth is fanning her wings - to spread her pheromones to attract males! TorterraGrey8 mr egg Average Viewer Miguel Jose Jared Blake ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Alex Burt Humburg Shebastian Reyes Egg-Roll Daniel Weinstein Josh Kuroda Chris B Emrick Wild Turkey Karen Reynolds dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Nathan Jewsbury Kevin Judge Kelly Hong Robert Amling Laurel Przybylski Gerardo Alfaro Elizabeth Ann Ditz Leonhardt Wille Sonia Tanlimco Mary Truland Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Supernovabetty Sayantan Dasgupta Carrie Mukaida monoirre Joshua Murallon Robertson Cindy McGill Silvan Aurora Rick Wong Roberta K Wright Titania Juang Levi Cai Guillaume Morin Nathan Wright Misia Clive Carlos Carrasco Kristy Freeman Caitlin McDonough Noreen Herrington Blanca Vides Teresa Lavell Cristen Rasmussen Nicolette Ray Dogman Kallie Moore Syniurge Scott Faunce SueEllen McCann Tearra Guice Geidi Rodriguez Louis O'Neill Laura Sanborn Aurora Mitchell KW Adam Kurtz TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, California, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
Here’s How That Annoying Fly Dodges Your Swatter | Deep Look Here’s How That Annoying Fly Dodges Your Swatter | Deep Look
3 months ago En
A fly has a pair of tiny, dumbbell-shaped limbs called halteres that were once a second pair of wings. They wield them to make razor-sharp turns and land out of reach on your ceiling. But don't despair – there *is* a trick to smacking these infuriating insects. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Flies are formidable opponents, with an arsenal of tools they carry all over their bodies. For starters, their hair and antennae help a fly sense us as we walk up to them. And a fly’s eyes and tiny brain process information 10 times faster than human eyes and brains. “Compared to flies, humans are slow and sluggish creatures,” said Sanjay Sane, who researches flies at the National Centre for Biological Sciences at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bangalore, India. Once the fly escapes your swatter and is in the air, it’s in its element and your job is even tougher. Seen up close and slowed down, a fly’s aerobatics are impressive: It makes razor-sharp turns with ease and at great speed. What makes this possible is a pair of modified wings called halteres, a Greek word for dumbbell, which describes their shape. All of the 200,000 species of flies that scientists have described have a pair of halteres and a pair of wings. (That includes mosquitoes, which, wouldn’t you know it, are flies too). Most other insects – bees, butterflies, dragonflies – have four wings and no halteres. --- How do flies’ halteres work? As a fly turns, its halteres sense the rotation. In a split second, neurons at the base of the halteres send information to the fly’s muscles to steer its wings and keep its head steady. “Houseflies flap their wings about 200 times per second, which means they really only have five milliseconds to figure out what the next wingbeat is going to be like. And if you’re using vision that takes too long to do,” said Jessica Fox, who studies flies at Case Western Reserve University, in Ohio. “They really need a mechanical receptor in order to be able to sense their body rotations and correct them on the timescale that they need.” --- How do flies land and stay on the ceiling? Their halteres allow them to rotate quickly to land on the ceiling. Once they’re there, they hang upside down with tiny hooks and sticky pads on their feet. The pads, called pulvilli, have microscopic hairs that excrete a liquid that sticks to the surface. --- How do I swat a fly? “Flies process information about moving objects but they cannot process static objects, Sane explained. “Thus, the best way to approach a fly is in small, quasi-static steps such that they do not see you as a moving object.” ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1971058/heres-how-that-annoying-fly-dodges-your-swatter/ ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the these 5 fans on our Community Tab for identifying the tiny limbs beneath a fly's wings - halteres: Tom Riddle Unknown Gamer CaeliGlori TorterraGrey8 Juanma G.V. ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Justin Bull Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Daniel Weinstein Egg-Roll Karen Reynolds Wild Turkey Chris B Emrick Josh Kuroda Tea Torvinen dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Elizabeth Ann Ditz Kevin Judge Leonhardt Wille Laurel Przybylski Dia Kelly Hong Robert Amling Gerardo Alfaro luna Mary Truland Sayantan Dasgupta Supernovabetty Joshua Murallon Robertson Aurora Pamela Parker Carrie Mukaida Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Cindy McGill Laura Sanborn Silvan Wendland monoirre Rick Wong Carlos Carrasco Titania Juang Roberta K Wright Misia Clive Nathan Wright Sonia Tanlimco Levi Cai Nicolette Ray Teresa Lavell Caitlin McDonough Kristy Freeman Blanca Vides Alexandre Valdetaro Guillaume Morin Noreen Herrington Scott Faunce Cristen Rasmussen Dogman Louis O'Neill Kallie Moore Geidi Rodriguez Syniurge SueEllen McCann KW Joao Ascensao Aurora Mitchell Sharon Merritt Adam Kurtz TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
See Sea Slugs Scour Seagrass by the Seashore | Deep Look See Sea Slugs Scour Seagrass by the Seashore | Deep Look
3 months ago En
Eelgrass sea hares may look like lazy, zebra-striped spoonfuls of jello, but these sea slugs are actually environmental heroes. Their voracious appetite for algae helps keep underwater meadow ecosystems in balance–which is great news for sea otters. Deep Look Mollusk Playlist! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wtLrlIKvJE&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBKKj0mY_irUMTg_yS5VEHY SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Eelgrass sea hares are tiny aquatic slugs named for the bunny-like tentacles on top of their head. They can be found munching on the microscopic algae that grow on the surface of eelgrass, a type of marine seagrass. Also known as the Taylor’s sea hare, these humble, zebra-striped slices of green jello are actually crucial to the health of their ecosystem. They don’t eat the grass itself; instead they help the meadows grow by clearing the way for sunlight to reach the plants, scraping the blades of grass clean with their rows of tiny teeth. The seagrass, in turn, serves as a safe haven to lay their eggs, and protection from predators like crabs and fish. The blades of grass also protect more than just these voracious little cleaners. At Elkhorn Slough, a large winding estuary off of Monterey Bay, the eelgrass beds form a habitat for a diverse community of animals and plant life, which includes sea otters, Dungeness crabs, clams, skeleton shrimp and various fish. For decades, nutrient overload from agricultural runoff has caused excessive algae blooms in Elkhorn Slough, as the thick algal mats block out the sunlight needed for the grass to grow. But with the reintroduction of sea otters to Elkhorn Slough in the 1980’s, ecologists observed a balancing effect on the system. The otters started eating the crabs that eat the sea hares. Because of this trophic cascade, the slug population grew, and their appetite for algae helped keep the eelgrass clean, counterbalancing the effects of the algal blooms. --- Is a sea hare a nudibranch? Nudibranchs and sea hares are both different types of sea slugs. There are various species of nudibranchs and sea hares. All sea slugs are a kind of mollusk. --- What is a trophic cascade? A trophic cascade occurs when the addition or removal of a top predator has a dramatic effect on the food web, drastically changing the structure of an ecosystem, and how nutrients cycle through it. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1970711/sea-hares-scrub-seagrass-by-the-seashore/ ---+ For more information: Paper on the ecological effects of sea otters, and their relationship to eelgrass and sea hares, by Brent Hughes, Sonoma State University - https://www.pnas.org/content/110/38/15313 Katharyn Boyer’s Lab at San Francisco State’s Estuary and Ocean Science Center, focusing on eelgrass ecology and restoration work in the San Francisco Bay http://online.sfsu.edu/katboyer/Boyer_Lab/Home.html ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Justin Bull Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Daniel Weinstein Egg-Roll Karen Reynolds Wild Turkey Chris B Emrick Josh Kuroda Tea Torvinen dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Elizabeth Ann Ditz Kevin Judge Leonhardt Wille Laurel Przybylski Dia Kelly Hong Robert Amling Gerardo Alfaro luna Mary Truland Sayantan Dasgupta Supernovabetty Joshua Murallon Robertson Aurora Pamela Parker Carrie Mukaida Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Cindy McGill Laura Sanborn Silvan Wendland monoirre Rick Wong Carlos Carrasco Titania Juang Roberta K Wright Misia Clive Nathan Wright Sonia Tanlimco Levi Cai Nicolette Ray Teresa Lavell Caitlin McDonough Kristy Freeman Blanca Vides Alexandre Valdetaro Guillaume Morin Noreen Herrington Scott Faunce Cristen Rasmussen Dogman Louis O'Neill Kallie Moore Geidi Rodriguez Syniurge SueEllen McCann KW Joao Ascensao Aurora Mitchell Sharon Merritt Adam Kurtz TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #seahares #seaslug #seaslugs
Ever Seen a Starfish Gallop? | Deep Look Ever Seen a Starfish Gallop? | Deep Look
4 months ago En
They may look cute and colorful, but starfish are actually voracious predators. To sniff out and capture their prey, they rely on hundreds of water-propelled tube feet, each with a fiercely independent streak. Watch the new PBS Terra science show, OVERVIEW: https://youtu.be/Lt9qYvKFumM SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- On a visit to a friend’s lab in Tokyo, marine biologists Amy Johnson and Olaf Ellers witnessed something they’d never seen before. The starfish in Tatsuo Motokawa’s lab weren’t content slowly gliding across the floor of their tank, they bounced and galloped, zooming around their enclosure. For one of the most familiar animals in the sea, this was a new behavior, never before described in the scientific literature. “It was an absolute epiphany,” said Johnson who studies how sea stars move and teaches marine biology along with Ellers at Bowdoin college in Maine. “ That moment we first saw them bounce completely transformed everything we were planning to do with our research.” Since then, Johnson and Ellers have worked to change the way we understand these animals who have successfully made a home on this planet for at least 450 million years. --- What do starfish eat? Most sea stars are predators. They hunt a variety of marine animals including bivalves like mussels and clams but also sponges, snails, algae. Some sea stars are scavengers that consume detritus. How do starfish breathe? Sea stars mostly transpire through their tube feet which have very thin walls. Oxygenated water travels to other parts of the starfish’s body through its water vascular system. Do all starfish have five arms? Nope! There are many types of sea stars and while most have five arms there are stars with fewer or more. Sea stars have radial symmetry, but may have evolved from a bilateral ancestor (with right and left sides). ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1970271/starfish-gallop-with-hundreds-of-tubular-feet/ ---+ For more information: Article: Sea star inspired crawling and bouncing https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsif.2019.0700 ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be Reborn | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak2xqH5h0YY&t=44s A Sand Dollar's Breakfast is Totally Metal | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxZdBPDNiF4 Decorator Crabs Make High Fashion at Low Tide | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwQcv7TyX04 For Pacific Mole Crabs It's Dig or Die | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfoYD8pAsMw ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the first five to ID both names for the water inlet structure on a starfish - the sieve plate or madreporite! Elise Wade Pet Owner younis ahmed Mospus the Spider MacKenzie Piacenti ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Justin Bull Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Daniel Weinstein Egg-Roll Karen Reynolds Wild Turkey Chris B Emrick Josh Kuroda Tea Torvinen dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Elizabeth Ann Ditz Kevin Judge Leonhardt Wille Laurel Przybylski Dia Kelly Hong Robert Amling Gerardo Alfaro luna Mary Truland Sayantan Dasgupta Supernovabetty Joshua Murallon Robertson Aurora Pamela Parker Carrie Mukaida Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Cindy McGill Laura Sanborn Silvan Wendland monoirre Rick Wong Carlos Carrasco Titania Juang Roberta K Wright Misia Clive Nathan Wright Sonia Tanlimco Levi Cai Nicolette Ray Teresa Lavell Caitlin McDonough Kristy Freeman Blanca Vides Alexandre Valdetaro Guillaume Morin Noreen Herrington Scott Faunce Cristen Rasmussen Dogman Louis O'Neill Kallie Moore Geidi Rodriguez Syniurge SueEllen McCann KW Joao Ascensao Aurora Mitchell Sharon Merritt Adam Kurtz TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #starfish #seastar #deeplook
Watch These Peregrine Falcons Become Fierce Parents | Deep Look Watch These Peregrine Falcons Become Fierce Parents | Deep Look
4 months ago En
High up in their 300-foot tower penthouse, falcon stars Annie and Grinnell's romance quickly gets real, as they face the tough demands of raising a family. They furiously guard their eggs from invaders, then stuff their screaming newborn chicks with meat. Will these kids ever leave the nest? Watch Self Evident on PBS Voices! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQkloQHtdo4&list=PL1mtdjDVOoOoOprSD5CrM3bvGeNvgkzGS DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) wildlife and nature series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Grinnell, a male peregrine falcon, looked up from his nest and started screaming. It was late March and he was taking a turn warming the four eggs he and his partner, Annie, were caring for in their home atop the bell tower at the University of California, Berkeley. A young female peregrine falcon, quite a bit larger than Grinnell, was lurking on the ledge above him. Young peregrine falcons will often come around the site where a pair is already nesting to check it out and plot a possible takeover. She walked right up to Grinnell in the nest and shrieked almost in his face. Grinnell spread his wings wide and swiftly chased her off the tower. Grinnell had reason to be territorial. He and Annie have been raising chicks on this 300-foot tower since 2017. Peregrine falcons are the fastest animals in the world: When in hot pursuit of a pigeon or other bird to pluck from midair they can reach 240 miles per hour – faster than a single engine plane. But even these raptor superstars need to settle down with a mate and have some babies to whom they can pass on their love for meat. When they do, they often pick a tall building in a city. Peregrine falcons regularly make their homes in cities across the United States, from New York to Chicago to San Francisco. --- --- Why do peregrine falcons nest on tall buildings? Tall buildings – just like the cliffs they live on in the wild – give peregrine falcons protection from predators, a perch from which to hunt pigeons and other birds and ledges where they can lay their eggs. --- Do peregrine falcons make nests? Peregrines don’t build a nest of twigs and leaves. In the wild, they lay their eggs on a ledge in a cliff into which the female has scratched a bowl-shaped depression called a scrape to prevent her eggs from rolling away. --- Why did the peregrine falcon nearly go extinct? The pesticide DDT, used heavily in the 1940s and until 1972 in the United States to control mosquitoes and agricultural pests, accumulated in peregrines’ bodies. It thwarted the development of their embryos. And it reduced the amount of calcium in the eggs, which resulted in eggshells so thin that they broke when parents sat on them. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1969983/raising-peregrine-falcon-chicks-is-a-real-cliff-hanger/ ---+ For more information: Watch Annie and Grinnell live on three cameras on the Cal Falcons channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmjo8Rlp6q98TZlG8TDF4GQ/featured ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Justin Bull Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Daniel Weinstein Egg-Roll Karen Reynolds Wild Turkey Chris B Emrick Josh Kuroda Tea Torvinen dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Tianxing Wang Elizabeth Ann Ditz Kevin Judge Leonhardt Wille Laurel Przybylski Dia Kelly Hong Robert Amling Gerardo Alfaro luna Mary Truland Sayantan Dasgupta Supernovabetty Joshua Murallon Robertson Aurora Pamela Parker Carrie Mukaida Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Cindy McGill Laura Sanborn Silvan Wendland monoirre Rick Wong Carlos Carrasco Titania Juang Roberta K Wright Misia Clive Nathan Wright Sonia Tanlimco Levi Cai Nicolette Ray Teresa Lavell Caitlin McDonough Kristy Freeman Blanca Vides Alexandre Valdetaro Guillaume Morin Noreen Herrington Scott Faunce Cristen Rasmussen Dogman Louis O'Neill Kallie Moore Geidi Rodriguez Syniurge SueEllen McCann KW Joao Ascensao Aurora Mitchell Sharon Merritt Adam Kurtz TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #peregrine #falcon #deeplook
Is a Spider's Web a Part of Its Mind? | Deep Look Is a Spider's Web a Part of Its Mind? | Deep Look
5 months ago En
Orb weaver spiders build exquisite spiral webs not only to catch insects, but to extend their senses. Once they shrink-wrap their prey with silk, the nearly blind spiders can store them for later, and read their web's strands as a kind of memory map to guide them back. Take the PBS Digital Studios Survey! http://to.pbs.org/2020survey SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look: http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) wildlife and nature series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- The more than 48,000 spider species create a wide variety of web styles. There are over 4,000 different species of orb weaver spiders alone; these are the eight-legged spinners that create the famous spiral-shaped webs. Anyone who’s watched orb weavers in action has seen them use their exquisite creations to deftly ensnare flying insects. Impressive as this, the webs function as much more than deadly traps. Webs play an integral role in everything an orb weaver does. When spiders are hungry, they can tighten the web’s strands and even adjust its size and shape, depending on what size of prey they’re in the mood for. These species are only able to see light, dark and a little movement, but they are somehow able to quickly navigate their webs, pinpointing their unlucky victims and binding them in silk, a meal saved for later. Because they can do so much with such tiny brains, some researchers think orb weavers use their webs as a form of extended cognition, outsourcing advanced mental tasks like problem-solving and memory. For example, once they have killed and wrapped their prey, a spider can store it for later, then easily find it again. They don’t need to remember every single thread they have spun — just a few previous steps. By using their webs to do some of their thinking for them, orb weavers may be preserving precious brain power for other necessary and complex tasks like capturing prey. --- Where do orb weavers spiders live? Orb weaver species live everywhere on planet earth except for Antarctica and the Arctic. As long as there is abundant food (i.e. insects) and a place to build their web, you are likely to find an orb weaver. --- What other kinds of spider webs are there besides orb webs? In addition to the signature spiral-shaped designs made by orb weavers, spider webs come in various other styles, such as tangles (aka cobwebs), funnels and sheets. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1969661/is-a-spiders-web-a-part-of-its-mind/ ---+ For more information: The work of Thomas Hesselberg http://www.thomashesselberg.com/ Hilton Japyassú’s work on extended cognition in spiders https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10071-017-1069-7 ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the top five emjoi and ascii artists for this episode! Eevee Extreme (55 votes) Amber Shepherd (20) Second Maker by KS (16) Seth Holton (16) Faixan Lol (10) ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Justin Bull Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Egg-Roll Josh Kuroda Daniel Weinstein Chris B Emrick Karen Reynolds Daniel Pang Tea Torvinen dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Nathan Z Tianxing Wang luna Kelly Hong Kevin Judge Elizabeth Ann Ditz Laurel Przybylski Gerardo Alfaro Leonhardt Wille Robert Amling Mary Truland Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Supernovabetty Laura Sanborn Sayantan Dasgupta Cindy McGill Pamela Parker Joshua Murallon Robertson monoirre Silvan Wendland Aurora Dia Roberta K Wright Sonia Tanlimco Levi Cai Guillaume Morin Misia Clive Caitlin McDonough Rick Wong Nathan Wright Titania Juang Carlos Carrasco Nicolette Ray Kristy Freeman Alexandre Valdetaro Syniurge Dogman Cristen Rasmussen Geidi Rodriguez Blanca Vides Scott Faunce Noreen Herrington Kallie Moore SueEllen McCann Teresa Lavell Louis O'Neill Aurora Mitchell Sharon Merritt Pushkar Chitale KW Joao Ascensao TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #orbweaverspiders #spiders #spiderwebs
This is NOT a Dandelion. | Deep Look This is NOT a Dandelion. | Deep Look
5 months ago En
Not every yellow bloom ― or fluffy white globe ― taking over your backyard is a dandelion. Some of them are close relatives called catsears. But both of them have a little secret. To tell them apart and discover why they’re so successful you need to peek under their petals. Take the PBS Digital Studios Survey: http://to.pbs.org/2020survey SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Gardeners cursing as they yank out yellow blooms from the ground might be misplacing their anger. Not everything that looks like a dandelion is one. Dandelions have many doppelgangers, among them the most successful plant you’ve never heard of: catsears. Bees and butterflies love the nectar and pollen provided by dandelions and catsears, and little songbirds like lesser goldfinches feed on their seeds. But it’s hard to convince some gardeners of their virtues. “Most people who have a nice turf want only grasses,” said Joe DiTomaso, a weed researcher who retired from the University of California, Davis. Whether you’re a friend or a foe, telling dandelions and catsears apart could be useful ― if only to know thine enemy ― and a fun way to ponder what makes these yellow blooms so successful. --- How do you tell if it’s a dandelion? Under a dandelion’s ― and a catsear’s ― petals you’ll see green structures that hold the bloom. They’re called phyllaries. In catsears, they all point up. In dandelions, some phyllaries curl down. Dandelion and common catsear leaves have a similar shape, with toothed edges that give dandelions their name ― an adaptation from the French dent-de-lion, or lion’s tooth. The leaves of the common catsear are more lobed than pointy and they’re furry, while dandelions’ are smooth. Both leaves are edible, prepared in salads or sautéed. One other way to tell them apart is that each stem of catsears branches into multiple blooms, while dandelions have only one bloom per stem. -- What other plants look like dandelions? A plant by the scientific name of Leontodon resembles dandelions so much that it is known as false dandelion. It is also known as lesser hawkbit, said DiTomaso. “Where it’s confusing is its leaves look fairly similar and it has one flower per stem like dandelion, so a lot of people think it’s dandelion,” he said. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1969214/this-is-not-a-dandelion ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest https://youtu.be/oPbH1YhsdP8 Why Do Tumbleweeds Tumble? https://youtu.be/dATZsuPdOnM ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the first five to correctly explain which flower was a dandelion and which was a catsear! TorterraGrey8 Original Name Ary Mailhos ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass Justin Bull Burt Humburg Alex Shebastian Reyes Egg-Roll Josh Kuroda Daniel Weinstein Chris B Emrick Karen Reynolds Daniel Pang Tea Torvinen dane rosseter David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube Nathan Z Tianxing Wang luna Kelly Hong Kevin Judge Elizabeth Ann Ditz Laurel Przybylski Gerardo Alfaro Leonhardt Wille Robert Amling Mary Truland Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Supernovabetty Laura Sanborn Sayantan Dasgupta Cindy McGill Pamela Parker Joshua Murallon Robertson monoirre Silvan Wendland Aurora Dia Roberta K Wright Sonia Tanlimco Levi Cai Guillaume Morin Misia Clive Caitlin McDonough Rick Wong Nathan Wright Titania Juang Carlos Carrasco Nicolette Ray Kristy Freeman Alexandre Valdetaro Syniurge Dogman Cristen Rasmussen Geidi Rodriguez Blanca Vides Scott Faunce Noreen Herrington Kallie Moore SueEllen McCann Teresa Lavell Louis O'Neill Aurora Mitchell Sharon Merritt Pushkar Chitale KW Joao Ascensao TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
What Actually Makes Water Roll Off a Duck's Back? | Deep Look What Actually Makes Water Roll Off a Duck's Back? | Deep Look
6 months ago En
Ducks and geese spend *a lot* of time preening their all-weather feathers. This obsessive grooming – and a little styling wax from a hidden spot on their back side – maintains the microscopic feather structure that keeps them warm and dry in frigid waters. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Summer is a great time to be a bird watcher in California. Ducks, geese, and many other species of aquatic birds come to California to breed, build nests and raise broods. If you go to your local pond right now, chances are good that you will see a mallard or Canada goose paddling along with a gaggle of its offspring in tow. But watch for too long and you might find yourself wondering “how do these birds stay warm and dry in the water?” It’s a question that Jack Dumbacher, curator of ornithology and mammalogy at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco has been asked many times. The secret to waterproof waterfowl, it turns out, lies in their feathers. “Aquatic bird feathers are really different than those of other birds,” Dumbacher said. --- What do ducks eat? Ducks eat a lot of different things, from snails and tadpoles to grass and fruit. Some ducks specialize in a certain food like fish, while others are more general in their appetites. Is it OK to feed bread to ducks? Bread is like junk food to ducks and geese because it doesn’t contain the nutrition they need from their typical diet in the wild. Foods like insects and aquatic plants contain more nutrients than carbohydrate-rich bread. How do ducks float? In addition to keeping them warm and helping them fly, ducks rely on their feathers to make them buoyant in water. Soft fuzzy down feathers keep a layer of warm air next to the bird’s skin. The larger vaned feathers create the contour of the duck and keep water out. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1968261/what-actually-makes-water-roll-off-a-ducks-back ---+ For more information: This 2016 study by scientists at the University of Debrecen in Hungary, shows that aquatic birds like ducks and geese not only have feathers with denser, more tightly knit microstructures than their terrestrial counterparts, but they also have more of them. https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1365-2435.12820 ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: What Makes Owls So Quiet and So Deadly? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a68fIQzaDBY&t=39s You've Heard of a Murder of Crows. How About a Crow Funeral? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixYVFZnNl6s&t=87s ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the first five to correctly identify the the tiny hooks that keep feathers from splitting apart - barbicels! Avi Harris Mariana C Pyxis Pinkeu Panda0914 geraete 01 ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Alexandre Valdetaro Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Cindy McGill Companion Cube Cristen Rasmussen Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Pang Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dia Dogman Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Julie Smith Devous Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kelly Hong Kevin Judge Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Madhuri Yechuri Mary Truland Misia Clive monoirre Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Pamela Parker Pauley Rick Wong Robert Amling Roberta K Wright Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen Teresa Lavell TierZoo Titania Juang ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
Cape Sundews Trap Bugs In A Sticky Situation | Deep Look Cape Sundews Trap Bugs In A Sticky Situation | Deep Look
7 months ago En
Cape sundews are carnivorous plants that grow in bogs, where they don't have access to many nutrients. So they exude sweet, shimmering droplets from their tentacles to lure in unsuspecting insects. Once their prey is hopelessly stuck, they wrap it up and dissolve it for a tasty meal. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- If you have houseplants, most of the time there's not a lot of visible activity. But then there are carnivorous plants, like sundews. They aren’t content to just sit still. Typically found in habitats where other plants usually can’t thrive — like bogs with nutrient-poor soil — they often need to supplement their diet with nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. Carnivorous plants have developed a way to obtain these key nutrients from another source: insects. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1966521/cape-sundews-trap-bugs-in-a-sticky-situation ---+ Why must you use distilled water with carnivorous plants? “Many carnivorous plants have evolved carnivory in response to a substantial lack of nutrients in their native soils. As a result of living in nutrient-poor soils for so long, their root systems tend to be very sensitive to minerals. It’s like if you stayed inside for months, then went out on a sunny day. Your skin is going to be extra-sensitive and could burn easily. We give them rainwater or distilled water that has these minerals removed.” ---+ What happens to the exoskeletons of the insects after they finish digesting them? “Carnivorous plants can only digest soft tissues, and insect exoskeletons (made of out chitin and other proteins) are too tough and too nutrient-poor for them to digest. Exoskeletons are left behind after digestions and depending on the plant, can be washed away by rain, or simply just “hang out” on the leaf. Many carnivores can continue to catch insects even if there is an exoskeleton left behind as long as it doesn’t impede the mechanical trapping mechanism.” ---+ Do these plants have predators? “Yes! Traditional “pests” like grasshoppers, caterpillars, aphids, scale, mealybugs, etc. can chew holes in traps or weaken developing leaves. Many can avoid the traps themselves.” ---+ The above answers were provided by David Fefferman of the Carnivorous Plant Resource. For more information: Carnivorous Plant Resource https://carnivorousplantresource.com/ The Exploratorium: Electrified Plants Video https://www.exploratorium.edu/video/electrified-plants KQED: Predatory Plant: Lure of the Cobra Lily https://www.kqed.org/science/12317/predatory-plant-lure-of-the-cobra-lily ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following five fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for first correctly identifying the sticky hairs on our sundews, called glandular trichomes, or glandular tentacles! Ary Mailhos geezluis Dylan Lawrence spontaneous creativity Carmella Papa ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alexandre Valdetaro Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Cindy McGill Companion Cube Cristen Rasmussen Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Pang Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Dia Dogman Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Julie Smith Devous Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kevin Judge Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Madhuri Yechuri Mary Truland Misia Clive monoirre Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Pamela Parker Pauley Rick Wong Robert Amling Roberta K Wright Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen Teresa Lavell TierZoo Titania Juang ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #carnivorousplants #capesundew #deeplook
Ensatina Salamanders Are Heading For a Family Split | Deep Look Ensatina Salamanders Are Heading For a Family Split | Deep Look
8 months ago En
Ensatinas are a sprawling group of colorful salamanders, each one with different strategies for avoiding predators, from bold warning colors to confusing camouflage. Their diverse family tree offers us a rare snapshot of millions of years of evolution – how one species becomes many. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Even though they sport different colors and behaviors, and are spread out across the Western coastal states, from Canada to Baja California, they are still considered one species. That is because all types of ensatinas are able to mate and have offspring with each of their neighbors. But when researchers look more closely, the two types of ensatinas at the southern tips of their range — the Monterey ensatina and the large-blotched ensatina — only rarely mate and have offspring where their populations overlap. Some combination of genetic differences, habitat preference and behavior are keeping the lineages separate. This makes ensatina salamanders a rare example of a “ring species” — an animal that spread and adapted around a geographic barrier — in this case, California’s dry Central Valley — only to come back together millions of years later as near strangers. A ring species like the ensatina is unique in that it neatly illustrates the rich story of evolution — an idea that English biologist Charles Darwin and others have supported with countless studies since 1859, when Darwin published his landmark book “On the Origin of Species.” Evolutionary scientists are looking at ensatinas to build on Darwin’s original ideas about how species form; and as a way to help understand biodiversity all across the planet. ---+ Are ensatina salamanders poisonous? They can exude a slightly toxic milky substance from poison glands in their tails, but this substance is not dangerous to predators. ---+ What is the difference between a salamander and a newt? Newts are a type of salamander, belonging to a subfamily called Pleurodelinae of the family Salamandridae. Most newts have webbed feet and a paddle-like tail, which make it easier to live in the water during the aquatic stages of their lives. Salamanders typically have longer and more rounded tails with well-developed toes for digging in soil. ---+ More info Tom Devitt on ensatinas: https://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/0_0_0/devitt_01 More Barry Sinervo's work here: Lizards Have Been Playing Rock-Paper-Scissors for 15 Million Years” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rafdHxBwIbQ ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1966227/these-sneaky-ensatina-salamanders-are-heading-for-a-family-split ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following five fans on our Community Tab for being the first to name all 3 newt species the ensatina mimics! Mildred Tara Damer Tim Garcia Noah K. Jones LunarGaming54 (Taricha torosa - California newt, Taricha sierrae - Sierra newt, and Taricha granulosa - Rough-skinned newt.) ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Alexandre Valdetaro Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Cristen Rasmussen Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Pang Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Dia Dogman Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Julie Smith Devous Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kevin Judge Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland Misia Clive monoirre Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Pamela Parker Pauley Rick Wong Robert Amling Roberta K Wright Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen Teresa Lavell TierZoo Titania Juang ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #ensatina #salamander #deeplook
Glasswing Butterflies Want To Make Something Perfectly Clear | Deep Look Glasswing Butterflies Want To Make Something Perfectly Clear | Deep Look
9 months ago En
Ever wanted to be invisible? The elusive glasswing butterfly knows just how to do it. Its transparent wings, covered in an anti-glare nano-coating, help it hide from its predators in the rainforest. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Bay Area biologists are studying a beautiful and exotic butterfly with the hope that their findings may one day improve technologies from eyeglasses to solar panels. Named for their transparent wings, glasswing butterflies have evolved a clever disappearing act to avoid their many predators in the rainforests of South and Central America. “Most things in the rainforest are either bright and flashy or they're trying their best to hide,” said Aaron Pomerantz, a doctoral candidate in the Nipam Patel Lab at UC Berkeley and the Marine Biological Laboratory. “There aren't a lot of things that are just trying to be invisible like the glasswings.” --- What are butterfly wings made of? A butterfly’s wings are mainly composed of chitin, the same tough flexible material that their exoskeleton is made of. Most butterflies’ wings and bodies are covered in row after row of tiny scales that protect the butterfly and keep water from sticking to their wing which would weigh them down. What do butterflies eat? Most butterflies use a long proboscis to drink nectar from flowers. As caterpillars, they mostly eat plants Why do butterflies have bright colors? Some butterflies try to stand out by using bright colors and clashing patterns that serve as a warning to predators. These butterflies typically eat plants rich in chemicals as caterpillars that make them poisonous or distasteful. This type of warning signal is called aposematism. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1964775/glasswing-butterflies-want-to-make-something-perfectly-clear ---+ For more information: The Patel Lab of Evolutionary Development at the Marine Research Institute in Woods Hole, MA http://www.patellab.net/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29Ts7CsJDpg Why Is The Very Hungry Caterpillar So Dang Hungry? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=el_lPd2oFV4 The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fguo3HvWjb0 ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the first five to correctly identify the microscopic waxy structures that stop the glare on glasswing butterfly's wings: nanopillars! Srijan Srivastava Roslina Tamold Renee Hau Shiny Gamer The Lucky One ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Alexandre Valdetaro Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Cristen Rasmussen Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Pang Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Roberta K Wright Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen Teresa Lavell TierZoo Titania Juang ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
Sharpshooter Insects’ Sexy Vibrations Spell Trouble in the Vineyard | Deep Look Sharpshooter Insects’ Sexy Vibrations Spell Trouble in the Vineyard | Deep Look
9 months ago En
Sharpshooter insects are beautiful, but they transmit a devastating disease that kills grapevines. When it's time to mate, they shake their abdomens to make strange calls that – when amplified in a lab – sound like a clucking chicken, a howling monkey or a motorcycle revving up. Now scientists have found a way to use their songs against them. Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Entomologist Rodrigo Krugner has spent days on end listening to insects’ intimate conversations. This esoteric and painstaking bit of spy work is for a good cause: protecting your glass of California wine and bunch of table grapes. Krugner studies the mating calls of sap-sucking insects called sharpshooters at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s research facility in Parlier, in the California Central Valley. As it turns out, the insects’ pillow talk is pretty entertaining. “They have harmonics and some are beautiful,” Krugner said. “Some sound like a baby crying, some sound like a motorcycle.” --- Why are sharpshooters a problem for grape growers? Sharpshooters make a living hopping around plants like grapevines and feeding on their sap. They dig their mouthpart into a grapevine’s xylem, the tissue that carries up water and small amounts of sugars and minerals from the roots and distributes this sap throughout the plant. While sharpshooters stuff themselves, they inject a bacterium called Xylella fastidiosa into grapevines. The bacteria cause Pierce’s disease, which kills grapevines by dehydration. Blue-green sharpshooters are the main transmitters of Pierce’s disease in California’s world-renowned wine regions of Napa and Sonoma and along the state’s coast. The invasive glassy-winged sharpshooter – a larger red and brown insect – spreads the disease in Southern California and the California Central Valley. --- How do sharpshooter insects make their mating calls? Sharpshooters vibrate their abdominal muscles to call out to potential mates on grapevines. While other insects, such as cicadas, have air sacs that help them communicate, sharpshooters use their entire bodies as noisemakers. “Insects aren’t one solid piece,” Krugner said. “The source of the signal is the muscles. Once they vibrate the muscles, the exoskeleton moves. Every tiny bit moves.” The sharpshooters’ vibrations travel down to the roots and from one vine to another. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1964051/sharpshooter-insects-sexy-vibrations-spell-trouble-in-the-vineyard ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHbwC-AIyTE For These Tiny Spiders, It's Sing or Get Served: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7qMqAgCqME ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the fan on our Deep Look Community Tab for correctly identifying the sharpshooter's special feeding mouthpart - the stylet, and the pathogen they inject - Xyllela fastidiosa: Daksh Kumar Sharma ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Alexandre Valdetaro Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #sharpshooter #insect #wine
How The Coronavirus Attacks Your Lungs | Deep Look How The Coronavirus Attacks Your Lungs | Deep Look
9 months ago En
The new coronavirus packs a devastating punch. It penetrates deep into your lungs, causing our immune cells to go haywire and damage tiny air sacs – the alveoli – where oxygen normally flows into our blood. More COVID-19 Reporting and resources from KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1963200/how-covid-19-attacks-your-lungs Educators: Engage your students in an NGSS-aligned discussion about this video on KQED Learn: https://learn.kqed.org/discussions/68. KQED Learn is a safe online platform for middle and high school students to practice academic discourse. Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- The coronavirus has had an enormous impact on our lives: how we work, communicate and congregate. At this point, we’re familiar with how to protect ourselves from the virus – and the disease it causes, COVID-19 – by washing our hands thoroughly, wearing masks and social distancing. Most people who get the virus are mildly sick and will recover at home. For others, the virus can be severe, even fatal. One significant way the virus attacks is deep in our lungs. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1963200/how-covid-19-attacks-your-lungs --- What are the symptoms of the new coronavirus? The Center for Disease Control advises on its website that “symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have COVID-19: Cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. Or at least two of these symptoms: fever; chills; Repeated shaking with chills; muscle pain; headache; sore throat; new loss of taste or smell.” --- How can I protect myself from the coronavirus? The Center for Disease Control has a comprehensive list of guidelines at cdc.gov, but the main tips to remember are: wash your hands often; avoid close contact with other people; cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover (like a mask or bandanna) when around others; cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your elbow; regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces in your home. --- If you’ve had the new coronavirus, are you now immune? The Center for Disease Control states on its website: “We do not know yet if having antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 can protect someone from getting infected with that virus again, or how long that protection might last. Scientists are doing studies to answer those questions.” ---+ For more information: KQED https://www.kqed.org/coronavirusliveupdates World Health Organization https://www.who.int/ Center for Disease Control https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Decompress with Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdKlciEDdCQBNcPi8j3XEXuTOKW8CgRgD ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Alexandre Valdetaro Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #covid19 #coronavirus #deeplook
California Floater Mussels Take Fish For an Epic Joyride | Deep Look California Floater Mussels Take Fish For an Epic Joyride | Deep Look
10 months ago En
The California floater mussel does a surprising amount of travel - for a bivalve. First it gets ejected from its parent's shell into the wide watery wilderness. Then it leads a nomad's life clamped on the fins or gills of a fish. Once it's all grown up, the mussel goes to work filtering the water, keeping it clean for all the life that depends on it. Check out Antarctic Extremes on PBS Terra: https://youtu.be/pzlA9HDNwBs DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- California floater mussels have evolved an ingenious method of launching their larvae, or glochidia, into the water, where they clamp onto a fish gill or fin. The larvae hitch a ride on the fish for a few weeks, absorbing nutrients from their hosts, until they drop off and begin life as a young mussel on the lake bed. If they’re lucky, the larvae on the fish will make it to the juvenile stage, and grow up to be hardworking living water filters. Adult mussels can live ten years. They can filter up to 38 gallons of water each per day. The mussels have two openings to take in and excrete water. Inside them, water passes through their gills, which are lined with thousands of cilia, tiny arms that filter out the nutrients and particles. Thousands of mussels in a small lake or waterway can improve overall water health and clarity, according to researchers. Also, their industrious filtration and sensitivity to pollutants makes them reliable indicators of freshwater quality. In 2013 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cut the water quality standard for ammonia content in half, based on research done with freshwater mussels. Mussels share their watery homes with a world class array of freshwater fish, snails, crayfish, and insects. --- Do all mussels need fish to fully develop? Many of the 300 or so other North American freshwater mussel species require one specific species of fish to help spread their numbers, some of which have evolved incredibly realistic fish lures, but the California floaters don’t seem to be so picky. --- Are freshwater mussels endangered? The California floater mussel is just one of about 300 species of native freshwater mussels in North America, approximately three-quarters of which are threatened, endangered or a species of special concern. --- Are these native California floater mussels different from the invasive freshwater mussel species? Invasive freshwater mussels like the Asian clam, zebra mussels and quagga mussels all attach to surfaces and inside pipes with sticky threads, wreaking havoc on boats, docks, water treatment plants and power plant cooling systems from Lake Tahoe to the Great Lakes. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1961648/california-floater-mussels-take-fish-for-an-epic-joyride ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the first five to correctly identify the - glochidia - mussel larvae! Gavin Bock Tristan Simpson Mohammed Suhail Sampson Ng MrSpodes ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge TierZoo Titania Juang Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
This Dangerous Mosquito Lays Her Armored Eggs – in Your House | Deep Look This Dangerous Mosquito Lays Her Armored Eggs – in Your House | Deep Look
10 months ago En
The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which can transmit dengue fever and Zika, makes a meal of us around our homes. And her eggs are hardy. They can dry out, but remain alive for months, waiting for a little water so they can hatch into squiggly larvae. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- While the efforts to end COVID-19 have upended daily life, here’s something easy you can do to fight other dangerous diseases. Go through your house and yard and eliminate breeding places for the mosquitoes that can transmit dengue fever, a painful and sometimes deadly disease that afflicts an estimated 100 million people worldwide each year. The white-striped Aedes aegypti mosquito can also pass on the viruses that cause Zika, which can lead to birth defects, and chikungunya, another painful joint disease. The mosquitoes lay their eggs in and around our homes and feed on humans; they’re especially attracted to ankles and the lower body. --- How do I get rid of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes? Their eggs are small and hard to spot, especially if the mosquito lays them in a dark container like a discarded tire. So experts recommend dumping the water out of containers in and around the house once a week, to get rid of any larvae that might have hatched from the eggs before they grow into adults. “They’re very opportunistic; they will lay their eggs in small, medium, large containers,” said Jeffrey Powell, who has studied the mosquito’s genetics at Yale. “It could be something small like a beer can that has water in it. A birdbath; a tire. In Brazil I’ve seen Aedes aegypti in the troughs people hold water in.” --- Where is the Aedes aegypti mosquito found? Aedes aegypti live around the world in tropical, subtropical and even temperate zones. In the United States they’re in parts of California and likely to be found in a vast swath that goes from Arizona and New Mexico, through Texas and Florida and up to Virginia. In the rest of the Americas they’re found between Mexico and Argentina. They’re in sub-Saharan Africa, in parts of Europe and the Middle East, and throughout Asia and Australia. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1960549/this-dangerous-mosquito-lays-her-armored-eggs-in-your-house/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU&t=31s ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for being the first five to correctly identify the part of the mosquito larva which sits just above the water - the siphon - and its purpose - to allow the larva to breathe! music fly Kunal Dhangar Likhith N Ethan Jaspers Genesis Anderson ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alex Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Joao Ascensao Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shebastian Reyes Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Steven SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge TierZoo Titania Juang Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #denguemosquito #aedesaegypti #deeplook
Walking Sticks Stop, Drop and Clone to Survive | Deep Look Walking Sticks Stop, Drop and Clone to Survive | Deep Look
11 months ago En
Indian walking sticks are more than just twig impersonators. They even clone themselves into a surprising variety of colors to stay hidden in plain sight from predators. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- There’s that old cheesy joke: What’s brown and sticky? A stick. But sometimes it’s not just a stick — but a walking stick. This non-native insect, originally from India, relies on clever camouflage to hide from predators. They’re so skilled at remaining undercover, you may not have noticed that they’ve made themselves right at home in your local park. Some Bay Area researchers are studying the insects’ genetics to learn more about how they are such masters of camouflage. "I can't think of any other insect as effective as they are in remaining hidden in plain sight," said Edward Ramirez, an undergraduate researcher at the University of California, Berkeley who is currently studying the genetics of Indian walking sticks. "How is this possible? was always the question that came to mind, so I wanted to search for a more clear answer." --- Are there male Indian walking sticks? There’s been no observable males, most likely due to the fact females are parthenogenic and don’t need a male to mate. They can just keep laying eggs without sexual fertilization and create hundreds of female offspring, which drastically alters the ratio of males to females. --- Are there any walking stick species with males? If the breeding conditions are right, males occur more frequently in the following three species: Australian stick insects (Extatosoma tiaratum), Jungle nymphs (Heteropteryx dilatata) and a species from Madagascar (Achrioptera fallax). --- What are some of the pros and cons of parthenogenic reproduction? Females can spend more time and energy looking for food and shelter instead of a mate, and they can reproduce faster and thus have a larger population size compared to species that require sexual reproduction. But they can have a lack of genetic variation since they don’t pass genes from separate individuals, and asexual reproduction may not be able to remove harmful mutations that could arise in the genome. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1958912/walking-sticks-stop-drop-and-clone-to-survive/ ---+ For more information: https://essig.berkeley.edu/ ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for coming up with the best names - as decided by fellow Deep Peeps - for a sweet walking stick dance move: Omar J Playz "Getting Sticky With It" Skyman 58 "The Wooden Wobble" Akasaka Ryuuwai "My tall friend at the club" Jordi Folland "Twiggle Wiggle" loveless "Incognito chopsticks" AND an honorable mention goes to: Shahzebfarrukh "the corono-dance (considering how they are keeping the distance) - A PSA by Deep look" ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! (NEED TO BE UPDATED?) Accailia Alex Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Jane Orbuch Joao Ascensao johanna reis Johnnyonnyful Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai liilscootscoot Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Rena G Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
A Flea's Fantastic Jump Takes More Than Muscle | Deep Look A Flea's Fantastic Jump Takes More Than Muscle | Deep Look
11 months ago En
Before they can bite your cat or dog, these little "itch hikers" make an amazing leap 100 times faster than the blink of an eye. So how do they do it? Follow Lauren Sommer in her new job at NPR: https://www.npr.org/people/803934365/lauren-sommer Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Spring is here, and with it, the start of flea season. With the warming weather, people and their pets are spending more time outside — which increases the chances of bringing home a hungry “itch hiker.” While pet owners curse the tiny insects and look for a way to rid them from their homes, it turns out fleas actually perform some remarkable athletic feats, like jumping 50 times their height — the equivalent of a human jumping 300 feet — or leaping so fast that they take off 100 times faster than the blink of an eye. No larger than a sesame seed and flattened side to side, fleas can slip through fur with ease. Their jump is so fast they seem to simply vanish and reappear somewhere else. “It's there and then it's gone,” said Gregory Sutton, a professor of biomechanics at the University of Lincoln in the United Kingdom. --- What do flea eggs look like? After feeding on blood, adult fleas mate and lay eggs. The eggs drop out of their host animal’s fur or feathers and into their bedding or nest. The eggs are translucent white and very small. At 0.5mm the eggs are about the size of a grain of salt. --- Why do fleas bite me? Blood is a protein-rich food for fleas. Adult fleas feed on blood before they can procreate. --- Why does my dog/cat keep getting fleas? Fleas are nest parasites. Their eggs fall from the host animal into its bedding where they hatch. The worm-like larvae feed on organic debris (including the adult fleas’ feces) in the bedding. They then curl up into a cocoon and undergo metamorphosis into their adult form. Flea baths tend to kill the fleas currently on the pet, but there may still be flea eggs and larvae in the pet’s bedding. When those young fleas mature they may reinfest the pet. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1957872/a-fleas-fantastic-jump-takes-more-than-muscle ---+ For more information: Why do Large Animals Never Actuate Their Jumps with Latch-Mediated Springs? Because They can Jump Higher Without Them. (Gregory P Sutton, Elizabeth Mendoza, Emanuel Azizi, Sarah J Longo, Jeffrey P Olberding, Mark Ilton, Sheila N Patek) https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/59/6/1609/5545545 ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans on our YouTube community tab who identified the colorful crustacean that stores energy and releases a powerful punch using the same mechanism that fleas use to jumpstart their jump: the mantis shrimp! The Chicken Wizard Skunky H Shin M. Soren Rohrbach kick Blade ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Accailia Alex Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto dane rosseter Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Jane Orbuch Joao Ascensao johanna reis Johnnyonnyful Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai liilscootscoot Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Rena G Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Sharon Merritt Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
Kangaroo Rats Are Furry, Spring-Loaded Ninjas | Deep Look Kangaroo Rats Are Furry, Spring-Loaded Ninjas | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Kangaroo rats use their exceptional hearing and powerful hind legs to jump clear of rattlesnakes — or even deliver a stunning kick in the face. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- As they forage, kangaroo rats need to continually scan the surrounding sandy environment for any predators – foxes, owls, and snakes – that could be anywhere. Once a well-camouflaged sidewinder rattlesnake strikes, aiming its venomous fangs at the furry seed-harvester, the kangaroo rat springs up, and away from the snake’s deadly bite, kicking its powerful hind legs at the snake’s face, and using its long tail to twist itself in mid-air away from the snake to safety. Kangaroo have the uncanny ability to jump high at just the right moment. Biologists believe that this most likely comes from its keen hearing, which is 90 times more sensitive than human ears, allowing the rats to react in as little as 50 milliseconds. In addition to their finely-tuned ears, the desert kangaroo rats’ highly-evolved musculature generates lots of force very quickly, resulting in jumps almost ten times their body height. Muscles in kangaroo rats have a thick tendon, surrounded by large muscles, which translates directly to more power and a faster reaction time. With its powerful hind limbs, the kangaroo rat is also able to deliver a “black belt” kick to the jaw of the rattlesnake, sending the rattlesnake soaring to the ground, before landing away from the snake. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1957226/kangaroo-rats-are-furry-spring-loaded-ninjas --- Can a kangaroo rat survive without water in the desert? The body of the kangaroo rat has evolved to be especially adapted to their harsh dry desert environments, so they are able to get all of their water from seeds they eat. --- How high can a kangaroo rat jump? Some kangaroo rats are able to jump as high as 9 feet, or approximately 10 times their body height. --- Are kangaroo rats endangered? There are 20 existing species of kangaroo rats. Six of these species are considered threatened. The two species featured in our episode, the Merriam’s kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami) and desert kangaroo rat (Dipodomys deserti) are not endangered, and relatively common in the desert areas they are found. ---+ For more amazing slow motion videos of kangaroo rats and rattlesnakes, visit our friends at: https://www.ninjarat.org/ ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to these fans on our YouTube community tab who identified the special parts in a kangaroo rats' skull that make their hearing so exceptional... the tympanic or auditory bullae: Lights, Camera, Ants Rohit Kumar Reddy Reddy Eric Fung Hotaru otakuman706 ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Jane Orbuch Joao Ascensao johanna reis John King Johnnyonnyful Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Katherine Schick Kathleen R Jaroma Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Nikita Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #kangaroorat #rattlesnake #deeplook
You Wish You Had Mites Like This Hissing Cockroach | Deep Look You Wish You Had Mites Like This Hissing Cockroach | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Not all roaches are filthy. The Madagascar hissing cockroach actually makes a pretty sweet pet, thanks to the hungry mites that serve as its cleaning crew. Check out Antarctic Extremes on PBS Terra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvRAuy1ZmTc SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- As the weather starts to warm and cold days give way to balmier, sunny days, one rite of spring returns every year, just like spring flowers: cockroaches. Most people run to buy a can of bug spray or to call the exterminator when they see the scurrying little insects in their kitchens or outside their homes. But not all roaches are pests. Some are pets – like the Madagascar hissing cockroach. They can be bought at pet stores or online for $5 or less. They don’t bite and don’t carry diseases. They are also much larger than the run-of-the-mill roach, with adults averaging about 3 inches long. They live up to five years. They are slow-moving and mellow – kind of like an old tabby cat. But with antennae. And an appetite for fresh vegetables. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1955611/you-wish-you-had-mites-like-this-hissing-cockroach --- Why do the cockroaches hiss? They’ll hiss when they’re sounding an alarm or startled, trying to attract a mate or protecting their territory from another male. --- Are the mites harmful to the cockroaches? No – they actually help prolong the cockroaches’ lives. --- What happens to the mites if its host cockroach dies? The mites will mate, give birth to their young and feed on the same cockroach their entire lives – so they’ll usually die within a few days after the cockroach dies, too, and not seek a new home. ---+ For more information: UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology http://bohart.ucdavis.edu/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: It’s a Bug’s Life: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdKlciEDdCQA1MVDuyxZPVloYV3wpunMO ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans on our YouTube community tab who correctly identified the creature from a past episode most closely related to cockroaches - the termite! Keroro407 John Marvin Accad Battledroid0521 Tiny Stash Jeanne Cabral Termites are basically social roaches. More info: https://gizmodo.com/termites-are-finally-being-recognized-for-what-they-rea-1823437375 ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Jane Orbuch Joao Ascensao johanna reis John King Johnnyonnyful Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Katherine Schick Kathleen R Jaroma Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Nikita Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, the largest science and environment reporting unit in California. KQED Science is supported by The National Science Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #hissingcockroaches #insect #deeplook
A Tsetse Fly Births One Enormous Milk-Fed Baby | Deep Look A Tsetse Fly Births One Enormous Milk-Fed Baby | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Mammalian moms, you're not alone! A female tsetse fly pushes out a single squiggly larva almost as big as herself, which she nourished with her own milk. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Mammalian moms aren’t the only ones to deliver babies and feed them milk. Tsetse flies, the insects best known for transmitting sleeping sickness, do it too. A researcher at the University of California, Davis is trying to understand in detail the unusual way in which these flies reproduce in order to find new ways to combat the disease, which has a crippling effect on a huge swath of Africa. When it’s time to give birth, a female tsetse fly takes less than a minute to push out a squiggly yellowish larva almost as big as itself. The first time he watched a larva emerge from its mother, UC Davis medical entomologist Geoff Attardo was reminded of a clown car. “There’s too much coming out of it to be able to fit inside,” he recalled thinking. “The fact that they can do it eight times in their lifetime is kind of amazing to me.” Tsetse flies live four to five months and deliver those eight offspring one at a time. While the larva is growing inside them, they feed it milk. This reproductive strategy is extremely rare in the insect world, where survival usually depends on laying hundreds or thousands of eggs. --- What is sleeping sickness? Tsetse flies, which are only found in Africa, feed exclusively on the blood of humans and other domestic and wild animals. As they feed, they can transmit microscopic parasites called trypanosomes, which cause sleeping sickness in humans and a version of the disease known as nagana in cattle and other livestock. Sleeping sickness is also known as human African trypanosomiasis. --- What are the symptoms of sleeping sickness? The disease starts with fatigue, anemia and headaches. It is treatable with medication, but if trypanosomes invade the central nervous system they can cause sleep disruptions and hallucinations and eventually make patients fall into a coma and die. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1956004/a-tsetse-fly-births-one-enormous-milk-fed-baby ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: “Parasites Are Dynamite” Deep Look playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2Jw5ib-s_I&list=PLdKlciEDdCQACmrtvWX7hr7X7Zv8F4nEi ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to these fans on our YouTube community tab who correctly identified the function of the black protuberances on a tsetse fly larva - polypneustic lobes: Jeffrey Kuo Lizzie Zelaya Art3mis YT Garen Reynolds Torterra Grey8 Despite looking like a head, they’re actually located at the back of the larva, which used them to breathe while growing inside its mother. The larva continues to breathe through the lobes as it develops underground. ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alice Kwok Allen Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Cameron Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Jane Orbuch Joao Ascensao johanna reis Johnnyonnyful Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Katherine Schick Kathleen R Jaroma Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #tsetsefly #sleepingsickness #deeplook
Crickets Use Their Wings To Sing | Deep Look Crickets Use Their Wings To Sing | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Male crickets have a different song for every occasion: to advertise their fitness, woo a mate or keep their rivals away. So how do they make all those different chirps? One word: stridulation. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Ask most people about crickets and you’ll probably hear that they’re all pretty much the same: just little insects that jump and chirp. But there are actually dozens of different species of field crickets in the U.S. And because they look so similar, the most common way scientists tell them apart is by the sounds they make. “When I hear an evening chorus, all I hear are the different species,” said David Weissman, a research associate in entomology at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Weissman has spent the last 45 years working to identify all the species of field crickets west of the Mississippi River. In December, he published his findings in the journal Zootaxa, identifying 35 species of field crickets in the western states, including 17 new species. California alone hosts 12 species. But many closely resemble the others. So even for one of the nation’s top experts, telling them apart isn’t a simple task. “It turns out song is a good way to differentiate,” Weissman said. --- How do crickets chirp? On the underside of male crickets’ wings there’s a vein that sticks up covered in tiny microscopic teeth, all in a row. It’s called the file. There's a hard edge on the lower wing called the scraper. When he rubs his wings together - the scraper on the bottom wing grates across all those little teeth on the top wing. It’s like running your thumb down the teeth of a comb. This process of making sound is called stridulation. --- How do crickets hear? Crickets have tiny ears, called tympana on each of their two front legs. They use them to listen for danger and to hear each other calling. --- Why do crickets chirp? Crickets have several different types of songs that serve different purposes. The familiar repetitive chirping song is a mating call that male crickets produce to attract females that search for potential mates. If a female makes physical contact with a male he will typically switch to a second higher-pitched, quieter courtship song. If instead a male cricket comes in contact with another adult male he will let out an angry-sounding rivalry call to tell his competitor to back off. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2020/01/14/crickets-chirp-to-flirt/ ---+ For more information: Professor Fernando Montealegre-Z’s bioacoustics lab http://bioacousticssensorybiology.weebly.com/ David Weissman’s article cataloging field crickets in the U.S. https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4705.1.1 ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans on our YouTube community tab for correctly identifying the name and function of the kidney bean-shaped structure on the cricket’s tibia - the tympanum, or tympanal organ: sjhall2009 Damian Porter LittleDreamerRem Red Segui Ba Ri ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alice Kwok Allen Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Barbara Pinney Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Daisuke Goto Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Jane Orbuch Joao Ascensao johanna reis John King Johnnyonnyful Josh Kuroda Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Katherine Schick Kathleen R Jaroma Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill luna Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Nikita Noreen Herrington Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home | Deep Look The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home | Deep Look
2 years ago En
To protect herself and her eggs, female webspinners shoot super-fine silk from their front feet. They weave the strands to build a shelter that serves as a tent, umbrella and invisibility cloak. But shooting silk from her feet requires her to moonwalk to get around. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- With the holidays just around the corner, it’s that time of year when you’re ready to burn off Thanksgiving turkey and Christmas cookie calories by heading outdoors for a hike. Maybe you’ve noticed what looks like spider webs woven in between weeds alongside the trail, or poking out from under rocks or draped across logs. But take a closer look – those webs might actually not be spider webs. A lot of them are silken habitats, known as 'galleries,' created by insects called webspinners. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1949380/ --- Where do webspinners live? You find them living in a variety of habitats all over the world, from humid tropical rain forests to dry, hotter areas. --- Do only adults spin silk? Actually, everybody spins silk, the males, females and the nymphs. It’s completely unique for insects to have that ability. --- Who is briefly featured in the episode turning over the log? While only her hands make a short cameo in the video, Janice Edgerly-Rooks, is a professor of biology at Santa Clara University. She’s been studying these insects for most of her career and was invaluable to us in the production of our episode. ---+ For more information: Janice Edgerly-Rooks’ at Santa Clara University https://www.scu.edu/cas/biology/faculty/edgerly-rooks/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: It’s a Bug’s Life: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdKlciEDdCQA1MVDuyxZPVloYV3wpunMO ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans on our YouTube community tab for correctly identifying the insects *besides webspinners* that produce silk with their front feet: the balloon flies of the Empididae family, such as Hilara maura. João Farminhão TheWhiteScatterbug Ryan Stuart Anthony Nguyen henry chu biozcw ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alice Kwok Allen Amber Miller Aurora Aurora Mitchell Bethany Bill Cass Blanca Vides Burt Humburg Caitlin McDonough Cameron Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Chris Murphy Cindy McGill Companion Cube Cory Daisuke Goto Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande David Esperanza Dean Skoglund Edwin Rivas Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Geidi Rodriguez Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Ivan Alexander Jacob Stone Jane Orbuch JanetFromAnotherPlanet Jeanne Sommer Joao Ascensao johanna reis Johnnyonnyful Joshua Murallon Robertson Justin Bull Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Katherine Schick Kathleen R Jaroma Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Kyle Fisher Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai Louis O'Neill lunafaaye Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nicolette Ray Nikita Noreen Herrington Nousernamepls Osbaldo Olvera Pamela Parker PM Daeley raspberry144mb riceeater Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sarah Khalida Mohamad Sayantan Dasgupta Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Shirley Washburn Silvan Wendland Simone Galavazi Sonia Tanlimco Stefficael Uebelhart SueEllen McCann Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen TierZoo Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish WhatzGames ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #webspinners #insect #deeplook
Tarantulas Take Hooking Up To The Next Level | Deep Look Tarantulas Take Hooking Up To The Next Level | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Every fall, male tarantulas leave home for good with one thing on their minds: sex. But before these spiders can make the ultimate connection, they have to survive the perils of the open road...which include their potential mates. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. -- Every September, a generation of newly mature male tarantulas leave their underground homes to wander the landscape south of La Junta, Colorado, to look for mates. The lucky males will find females, who remain near their dens the whole lives, and possibly mate. But this so-called “migration” is a one‐way trip. Among the many risks for these itinerant tarantulas, besides running out of time and becoming roadkill, are the local tarantula hawks. The two‐inch long, blue‐and‐gold wasps pounce on the unsuspecting arachnid travelers, hit them with a paralyzing sting, then drag them off to their lairs. Once there, the female wasp lays an egg on the spider that eventually hatches into a larva. The larva burrows inside him to feast and grow before emerging from his body, Alien‐like, as an adult. If a male does survive long enough to find a den, he courts the female by first “knocking” at the entrance by tapping the ground with his front mouth parts, called pedipalps. He must rely on vibration to communicate his intentions, since tarantulas are mostly blind. If the larger and more dangerous female comes out to investigate, they face off at the den entrance. She may reply with drumming of her own to indicate that she’s receptive ‐‐ or she might try to eat him. But he’s come prepared. When male tarantulas reach maturity, right before they set out on their quest, they develop a special set of clasps on their front legs called “tibial hooks.” Tibial hooks serve a single purpose: to fasten underneath the female’s fangs during courtship, allowing him to keep danger at arm’s length, so to speak. --- Are tarantulas dangerous? Though they do have venom, tarantulas don’t typically bite humans. If they do, the bite hurts no more than a papercut. --- How long do tarantulas live? The adult males of this species usually only live ten years, but females can live much longer, 30-40 years. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1950117/tarantulas-take-hooking-up-to-the-next-level ---+ For more information: Visit the Colorado State University Bug Zoo site: https://bspm.agsci.colostate.edu/the-bug-zoo/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes about spiders: Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bEjYunwByw Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpJNeGqExrc ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans on our YouTube community tab for correctly identifying the body part that male tarantulas use for drumming up interest from females - the pedipalps! Mitchel Castellon TheWhiteScatterbug Ian B Dragim Yutto Lydia Liu ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Alice Kwok Aurora Bethany Bill Cass Caitlin McDonough Cameron Carlos Carrasco Chris B Emrick Cindy McGill Daisuke Goto Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande David Esperanza Dean Skoglund Egg-Roll Elizabeth Ann Ditz Gerardo Alfaro Guillaume Morin Ivan Alexander Jane Orbuch JanetFromAnotherPlanet johanna reis Johnnyonnyful Joshua Murallon Robertson Kallie Moore Karen Reynolds Kendall Rasmussen Kristy Freeman KW Laura Sanborn Laurel Przybylski Leonhardt Wille Levi Cai lunafaaye Mary Truland monoirre Natalie Banach Nathan Wright Nikita Pamela Parker Richard Shalumov Rick Wong Robert Amling Robert Warner Roberta K Wright Sayantan Dasgupta Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Shirley Washburn Silvan Wendland Sonia Tanlimco Supernovabetty Syniurge Tea Torvinen Titania Juang Trae Wright Two Box Fish ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #tarantula #deeplook #spiders
This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Something is growing inside that fruit fly in your kitchen. At dusk, the fly points its wings straight up and dies in a gruesome pose so that a fungus can ooze out and fire hundreds of reproductive spores. Join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Some of the scariest monsters are the ones that grow inside another being and take over its body. Think of the movie Alien, where the reptile-like space creature explodes out of its victim’s chest. That monster might be fictional, but scientists are studying a fungus that’s horrifyingly real — at least for the flies it invades, turns into a zombie-like state and kills in order to reproduce. “Oh, it’s a nightmare for the flies,” said entomologist Brad Mullens, who studied the fungus at the University of California, Riverside. The fungus is known by its scientific name, Entomophthora muscae, which means “fly destroyer.” It lives off houseflies and fruit flies, among others. “It’s a crazy system,” said Carolyn Elya, a biologist at Harvard. “The fungus only kills at dusk.” Like a killer puppeteer, the fungus follows a precise clock. At dusk on the fourth or fifth day after it picks up a fungal spore, an infected fruit fly stops flying. It starts behaving erratically, for example climbing up and down toothpicks that Elya puts into the vials where she keeps the infected insects. Then the fly climbs to the top of the toothpick, a behavior Elya and other scientists refer to as “summiting.” In an unusual twist, the fly then extends its mouthpart down, and some liquid drips out and glues the fly to the surface it’s standing on. Over the next 10 minutes, the fly’s wings ascend until they’re pointing upwards and it dies frozen in this lifelike pose. Soon after, white spongy fungus oozes out of its abdomen. This white goo is made up of hundreds of lollipop-shaped protrusions which each launch a microscopic bell-shaped spore at high speed. Now the spores just need to get into another fly to grow. --- Could this or a similar fungus “zombify” humans? “No, it's very unlikely,” Elya said. “We can control our bodily temperature to kill invaders.” -- Can we use the fungus as biological control? Researchers have tried, but the spores are too fragile to grow in the lab. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1949314/this-killer-fungus-turns-flies-into-zombies ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to the following fans on our Deep Look Community Tab for coming up with the top titles - as decided by fellow Deep Peeps - for a horror movie starring this fungus: Joginiz - "Flyday the 13th' KingXDragoon - "Pretty Fly for a dead guy" Laura Garrard - The Fungus Among Us!! Lysiasolo - "Parafungal activity" De paus van de Lilith Kerk - The whitecorpse horror (as an ode to HP Lovecraft "the Dunwich horror") ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Trae Wright Justin Bull Bill Cass Alice Kwok Sarah Khalida Mohamad Stefficael Uebelhart Daniel Weinstein Chris B Emrick Seghan Seer Karen Reynolds Tea Torvinen David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Amber Miller Companion Cube WhatzGames Richard Shalumov Elizabeth Ann Ditz Robert Amling Gerardo Alfaro Mary Truland Shirley Washburn Robert Warner johanna reis Supernovabetty Kendall Rasmussen Sayantan Dasgupta Cindy McGill Leonhardt Wille Joshua Murallon Robertson Pamela Parker Roberta K Wright Shelley Pearson Cranshaw KW Silvan Wendland Two Box Fish Johnnyonnyful Aurora George Koutros monoirre Dean Skoglund Sonia Tanlimco Guillaume Morin Ivan Alexander Laurel Przybylski Allen Jane Orbuch Rick Wong Levi Cai Titania Juang Nathan Wright Syniurge Carl Kallie Moore Michael Mieczkowski Kyle Fisher Geidi Rodriguez JanetFromAnotherPlanet SueEllen McCann Daisy Trevino Jeanne Sommer Louis O'Neill riceeater Katherine Schick Aurora Mitchell Cory Nousernamepls Chris Murphy PM Daeley Joao Ascensao Nicolette Ray TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #fruitflies #deeplook
These Giant Leaf Insects Will Sway Your Heart | Deep Look These Giant Leaf Insects Will Sway Your Heart | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Giant Malaysian leaf insects stay still – very still – on their host plants to avoid hungry predators. But as they grow up, they can't get lazy with their camouflage. They change – and even dance – to blend in with the ever-shifting foliage. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- You’ll have to look closely to spot a giant Malaysian leaf insect when it’s nibbling on the leaves of a guava or mango tree. These herbivores blend in seamlessly with their surroundings because  they look exactly like their favorite food: fruit leaves.  But you can definitely see these fascinating creatures at the California Academy of Sciences, located in the heart of San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, through the spring of 2022.  An ongoing interactive exhibit, ‘Color of Life,’ explores the role of color in the natural world. It's filled with a variety of critters, including Gouldian finches, green tree pythons, Riggenbach's reed frogs, and of course, giant leaf insects. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1947830/these-giant-leaf-insects-will-sway-your-heart --- What do giant leaf insects eat? They’re herbivores, so they stick to eating leaves from their habitats, like guava and mango. --- What’s one main difference between male and female giant leaf insects? Males can actually fly as they have wings, which they use for mating. --- But did you know that females don’t need males for mating? They are facultatively parthenogenetic, which means they sometimes mate or sometimes reproduce asexually. If they mate with a male, they produce both males and females, but if the eggs remain unfertilized – only females are produced. ---+ For more information: Visit California Academy of Sciences https://calacademy.org/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: It’s a Bug’s Life: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdKlciEDdCQA1MVDuyxZPVloYV3wpunMO ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans on our YouTube community tab for correctly identifying the type of reproduction female leaf insects can use in the absence of a suitable male - parthenogenesis. Sylly Jim Spencer Rikki Anne Cara Rose GOT7 HOT7 THOT7 VISUAL7 ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Trae Wright Justin Bull Bill Cass Alice Kwok Sarah Khalida Mohamad Stefficael Uebelhart Daniel Weinstein Chris B Emrick Seghan Seer Karen Reynolds Tea Torvinen David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Amber Miller Companion Cube WhatzGames Richard Shalumov Elizabeth Ann Ditz Robert Amling Gerardo Alfaro Mary Truland Shirley Washburn Robert Warner johanna reis Supernovabetty Kendall Rasmussen Sayantan Dasgupta Cindy McGill Leonhardt Wille Joshua Murallon Robertson Pamela Parker Roberta K Wright Shelley Pearson Cranshaw KW Silvan Wendland Two Box Fish Johnnyonnyful Aurora George Koutros monoirre Dean Skoglund Sonia Tanlimco Guillaume Morin Ivan Alexander Laurel Przybylski Allen Jane Orbuch Rick Wong Levi Cai Titania Juang Nathan Wright Syniurge Carl Kallie Moore Michael Mieczkowski Kyle Fisher Geidi Rodriguez JanetFromAnotherPlanet SueEllen McCann Daisy Trevino Jeanne Sommer Louis O'Neill riceeater Katherine Schick Aurora Mitchell Cory Nousernamepls Chris Murphy PM Daeley Joao Ascensao Nicolette Ray TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #leafinsects #insect #deeplook
Kidnapper Ants Steal Other Ants' Babies - And Brainwash Them | Deep Look Kidnapper Ants Steal Other Ants' Babies - And Brainwash Them | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Kidnapper ants raid other ant species' colonies, abduct their young and take them back to their nest. When the enslaved babies grow up, the kidnappers trick them into serving their captors – hunting, cleaning the nest, even chewing up their food for them. Please join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. A miniature drama is playing out on the forest floor in California’s preeminent mountain range, the Sierra Nevada, at this time of year. As the sun sets, look closely and you might see a stream of red ants frantically climbing over leaves and rocks. They aren’t looking for food. They’re looking for other ants. They’re kidnappers. “It’s hard to know who you're rooting for in this situation,” says Kelsey Scheckel, a graduate student at UC Berkeley who studies kidnapper ants. “You're just excited to be a bystander.” On this late summer afternoon, Scheckel stares intently over the landscape at the Sagehen Creek Field Station, part of the University of California’s Natural Reserve System, near Truckee, California.“The first thing we do is try to find a colony with two very different-looking species cohabitating,” Scheckel says. “That type of coexistence is pretty rare. As soon as we find that, we can get excited.” --- How do ants communicate? Ants mostly use their sense of smell to learn about the world around themselves and to recognize nestmates from intruders. They don’t have noses. Instead, they use their antennae to sense chemicals on surfaces and in the air. Ants’ antennae are porous like a kitchen sponge allowing chemicals to enter and activate receptors inside. You will often see ants tap each other with their antennae. That behavior, called antennation, helps them recognize nestmates who will share the same chemical nest signature. ---Can ants bite or sting? Many ants will use their mandibles, or jaws, to defend themselves but that typically just feels like a pinch. Some ants have a stinger at the end of their abdomen that can deliver a venomous sting. While the type of venom can vary across species, many ants’ sting contains formic acid which causes a burning sensation. Some have special glands containing acid that can spray at attackers causing burning and alarming odors. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1947369/kidnapper-ants-steal-other-ants-babies-and-brainwash-them ---+ For more information: Neil Tsutsui Lab of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior of Social Insects at the University of California, Berkeley https://nature.berkeley.edu/tsutsuilab/ ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for correctly naming and describing the inter-species, mandible-to-mandible ant behavior we showed on our Deep Look Community Tab… "trophallaxis:" Senpai Ravinraven6913 CJ Thibeau Maksimilian Tašler Isha https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugy57BQZzqfuE-32aCt4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Leonhardt Wille Justin Bull Bill Cass Sarah Khalida Mohamad Daniel Weinstein Chris B Emrick Karen Reynolds Tea Torvinen David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube WhatzGames Richard Shalumov Elizabeth Ann Ditz Gerardo Alfaro Robert Amling Shirley Washburn Robert Warner Supernovabetty johanna reis Kendall Rasmussen Pamela Parker Sayantan Dasgupta Joshua Murallon Robertson Cindy McGill Kenia Villegas Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Aurora Dean Skoglund Silvan Wendland Ivan Alexander monoirre Sonia Tanlimco Two Box Fish Jane Orbuch Allen Laurel Przybylski Johnnyonnyful Rick Wong Levi Cai Titania Juang Nathan Wright Carl Michael Mieczkowski Kyle Fisher JanetFromAnotherPlanet Kallie Moore SueEllen McCann Geidi Rodriguez Louis O'Neill Edwin Rivas Jeanne Sommer Katherine Schick Aurora Mitchell Cory Ricardo Martinez riceeater Daisy Trevino KW PM Daeley Joao Ascensao Chris Murphy Nicolette Ray TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.
This Bee Gets Punched by Flowers For Your Ice Cream | Deep Look This Bee Gets Punched by Flowers For Your Ice Cream | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Alfalfa leafcutting bees are way better at pollinating alfalfa flowers than honeybees. They don’t mind getting thwacked in the face by the spring-loaded blooms. And that's good, because hungry cows depend on their hard work to make milk. Join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Please take our annual PBSDS Survey, for a chance to win a T-shirt! https://www.pbsresearch.org/c/r/DL_YTvideo DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Sure, cows are important. But next time you eat ice cream, thank a bee. Every summer, alfalfa leafcutting bees pollinate alfalfa in an intricate process that gets them thwacked by the flowers when they release the pollen that allows the plants to make seeds. The bees’ hard work came to fruition last week when growers in California finished harvesting the alfalfa seeds that will be grown to make nutritious hay for dairy cows. This is how it works. To produce alfalfa seeds, farmers let their plants grow until they bloom. They need help pollinating the tiny purple flowers, so that the female and male parts of the flower can come together and produce fertile seeds. That’s where the grayish, easygoing alfalfa leafcutting bees come in. Seed growers in California release the bees – known simply as cutters – in June and they work hard for a month. Alfalfa’s flowers keep their reproductive organs hidden away inside a boat-shaped bottom petal called the keel petal, which is held closed by a thin membrane that creates a spring mechanism. Cutter bees come up to the flower looking for nectar and pollen to feed on. When they land on the flower, the membrane holding the keel petal breaks and the long reproductive structure pops right up and smacks the upper petal or the bee, releasing its yellow pollen. This process is called “tripping the flower.” When the flower is tripped, pollen falls on its female reproductive organ and fertilizes it; bees also carry pollen away on their hairy bodies and help fertilize other flowers. In a few weeks, each flower turns into a curly pod with seven to 10 seeds growing inside. Cutters trip 80 percent of flowers they visit, compared to honeybees, which only trip about 10 percent. --- --- What kind of a plant is alfalfa? Alfalfa is a legume, like beans and chickpeas. Other legumes also hold their reproductive organs within a keel petal. --- What do bees use leaves for? Alfalfa leafcutting bees and other leafcutter bees cut leaf and petal pieces to build their nest inside a hole, such as a nook and cranny in a log. Alfalfa farmers provide bees with holes in styrofoam boards. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1946996/this-bee-gets-punched-by-flowers-for-your-ice-cream ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for correctly identifying the bee body part coated in pollen, on our Leafcutting Bee - the scopa or scopae! Punkonthego GamingCuzWhyNot Galatians 4:16 Gil AGA Edison Lewis ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Leonhardt Wille Justin Bull Bill Cass Sarah Khalida Mohamad Daniel Weinstein Chris B Emrick Karen Reynolds Tea Torvinen David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Companion Cube WhatzGames Richard Shalumov Elizabeth Ann Ditz Gerardo Alfaro Robert Amling Shirley Washburn Robert Warner Supernovabetty johanna reis Kendall Rasmussen Pamela Parker Sayantan Dasgupta Joshua Murallon Robertson Cindy McGill Kenia Villegas Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Aurora Dean Skoglund Silvan Wendland Ivan Alexander monoirre Sonia Tanlimco Two Box Fish Jane Orbuch Allen Laurel Przybylski Johnnyonnyful Rick Wong Levi Cai Titania Juang Nathan Wright Carl Michael Mieczkowski Kyle Fisher JanetFromAnotherPlanet Kallie Moore SueEllen McCann Geidi Rodriguez Louis O'Neill Edwin Rivas Jeanne Sommer Katherine Schick Aurora Mitchell Cory Ricardo Martinez riceeater Daisy Trevino KW PM Daeley Joao Ascensao Chris Murphy Nicolette Ray TierZoo ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #leafcutter #bees #deeplook
Peregrine Falcons are Feathered Fighter Jets, Basically | Deep Look Peregrine Falcons are Feathered Fighter Jets, Basically | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Peregrine falcons catch other birds mid-flight by diving at more than 200 mph. To do it, they need some high-precision gear: special eyesight, talons and aerodynamics that can't be beat. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- While known for being the world’s fastest bird–peregrines have been clocked at diving more than 200 miles per hour–these majestic birds were at risk for going extinct 50 years ago. Widespread use of pesticides such as DDT decimated native populations of peregrine falcons. By 1970, California’s peregrine population had dwindled to only two known nesting pairs statewide. The federal government banned DDT in 1972. And successful restoration efforts spearheaded by organizations like The Peregrine Fund helped revive their numbers. By 1999, they were removed from the federal Endangered Species List. Recent surveys estimate that there are now 300 to 350 nesting pairs in California and more than 2400 pairs nationwide. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1944037/peregrine-falcons-are-feathered-fighter-jets-basically --- What’s the origin of the Peregrine Falcon's name? Peregrine is Latin for "Peregrinus," which means “traveler” or “pilgrim.” --- How many eyelids do raptors, or birds or prey, like peregrine falcons have? They have three! Two eyelids are used for closing their eyes, while the third is used for blinking. It’s also called the nictitating membrane and helps to protect their eyes and keep them moist and clean. It’s semi-transparent, so they can actually still see through it when it’s closed. --- Did you know they have a special bone to protect their eyes? It’s called a sclerotic ring and helps support and secure their eyeballs within their skulls. ---+ For more information: Visit The Peregrine Fund https://www.peregrinefund.org/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Things With Wings: https://youtu.be/a68fIQzaDBY ---+ Shoutout! ---+ 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for coming up with the best emoji or ASCII tributes to this fine feathered bird in our community tab challenge: Sandcastle • ɐɯɹɐʞ ɐıuɐɯ lieutenant giwaffe Sectumsempra, b****! Sweetle pie.3. Go look at all the entries here! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgwOc06o6J5Zl1ssUE54AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carl, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Cindy McGill, Companion Cube, Cory, Daisuke Goto, Daisy Trevino , Daniel Voisine, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Dean Skoglund, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Geidi Rodriguez, Gerardo Alfaro, Ivan Alexander, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanne Sommer, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Kallie Moore, Karen Reynolds, Katherine Schick, Kendall Rasmussen, Kenia Villegas, Kristell Esquivel, KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Leonhardt Wille, Levi Cai, Louis O'Neill, Michael Mieczkowski, Michele Wong, monoirre, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Nicolette Ray, NoahCXXIII, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, riceeater, Richard Shalumov, Rick Wong, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Sayantan Dasgupta, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, Sonia Tanlimco, SueEllen McCann, Supernovabetty, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Titania Juang, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #peregrinefalcon #bird #deeplook
Look Inside a Rattlesnake's Rattle | Deep Look Look Inside a Rattlesnake's Rattle | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Check out America From Scratch: https://youtu.be/LVuEJ15J19s A rattlesnake's rattle isn't like a maraca, with little bits shaking around inside. So how exactly does it make that sound? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Watch America From Scratch: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClSZ6wHgU2h1W7eAGaa7cUw DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Rattlesnakes are ambush predators, relying on staying hidden to get close to their prey. They don’t sport the bright colors that some venomous snakes use as a warning to predators. Fortunately, rattlesnakes have an unmistakable warning, a loud buzz made to startle any aggressor and hopefully avoid having to bite. If you hear the rattlesnake’s rattle here’s what to do: First, stop moving! You want to figure out which direction the sound is coming from. Once you do, slowly back away. If you do get bitten, immobilize the area and don't overly exert yourself. Immediately seek medical attention. You may need to be treated with antivenom. DO NOT try to suck the venom out using your mouth or a suction device. DO NOT try to capture the snake and stay clear of dead rattlesnakes, especially the head. --- How do rattlesnakes make that buzzing sound? The rattlesnake’s rattle is made up of loosely interlocking segments made of keratin, the same strong fibrous protein in your fingernails. Each segment is held in place by the one in front and behind it, but the individual segments can move a bit. When the snake shakes its tail, it sends undulating waves down the length of the rattle, and they click against each other. It happens so fast that all you hear is a buzz and all you see is a blur. --- Why do rattlesnakes flick their tongue? Like other snakes, rattlesnakes flick their tongues to gather odor particles suspended in liquid. The snake brings those scent molecules back to a special organ in the roof of their mouth called the vomeronasal organ or Jacobson's organ. The organ detects pheromones originating from prey and other snakes. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED: https://www.kqed.org/science/1945648/5-things-you-thought-you-knew-about-rattlesnakes ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Stinging Scorpion vs. Pain-Defying Mouse | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-K_YtWqMro&t=35s ---+ 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for coming up with the *best* new names for the Jacobson's organ in our community tab challenge: Pigeon Fowl - "Noodle snoofer" alex jackson - "Ye Ol' Factory" Aberrant Artist - "Tiny boi sniffer whiffer" vandent nguyen - "Smeller Dweller" and "Flicker Snicker" ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Bluapex, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carl, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Cindy McGill, Companion Cube, Cory, Daisuke Goto, Daisy Trevino , Daniel Voisine, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Dean Skoglund, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Eric Carter, Geidi Rodriguez, Gerardo Alfaro, Ivan Alexander, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jeanne Sommer, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Kallie Moore, Karen Reynolds, Katherine Schick, Kendall Rasmussen, Kenia Villegas, Kristell Esquivel, KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Michele Wong, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Nicolette Ray, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, riceeater, Richard Shalumov, Rick Wong, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Samuel Bean, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, Sonia Tanlimco, SueEllen McCann, Supernovabetty, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Titania Juang, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim, Yvan Mostaza, ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
Watch Bed Bugs Get Stopped in Their Tracks | Deep Look Watch Bed Bugs Get Stopped in Their Tracks | Deep Look
2 years ago En
At night, these parasites crawl onto your bed, bite you and suck your blood. Then they find a nearby hideout where they leave disgusting telltale signs. But these pests have an Achilles’ heel that stops them cold. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Adult bed bugs are about the size and color of an apple seed. After biting, they hide in a nearby cranny, like the seam of the mattress. At the University of California, Irvine, biologist and engineer Catherine Loudon is working to create synthetic surfaces that could trap bed bugs. She was inspired by the tiny hooked hairs that grow from the leaves of some varieties of beans, such as kidney and green beans. In nature, these hairs, called trichomes, pierce through the feet of the aphids and leafhoppers that like to feed on the plants. Researchers have found that these pointy hairs are just as effective against bed bugs, even though the bloodsucking parasites don’t feed on leaves. Loudon’s goal is to mimic a bean leaf’s mechanism to create an inexpensive, portable bed bug trap. “You could imagine a strip that would act as a barrier that could be placed virtually anywhere: across the portal to a room, behind the headboard, on subway seats, an airplane,” Loudon said. “They have six legs, so that’s six opportunities to get trapped.” --- Where do bed bugs come from? Bed bugs don’t fly or jump or come in from the garden. They crawl very quickly and hide in travelers’ luggage. They also move around on secondhand furniture, or from apartment to apartment. --- How can I avoid bringing bed bugs home? “It would probably be a prudent thing to do a quick bed check if you’re sleeping in a strange bed,” said Potter. His recommendation goes for hotel rooms, as well as dorms and summer camp bunk beds. He suggests pulling back the sheet at the head of the bed and checking the seams on the top and bottom of the mattress and the box spring. ---+ For more tips, read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1944245/watch-bed-bugs-get-stopped-in-their-tracks ---+ More Great Deep Look Episodes: ‘Parasites are Dynamite’ Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdKlciEDdCQACmrtvWX7hr7X7Zv8F4nEi ---+ 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for correctly identifying the creature's species name in our community tab challenge: Stay in Your Layne Brian Lee Brad Denney Elise Wade Raminta’s Photography https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugz37Tnkfr8gOF7tRL54AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Bluapex, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carl, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Cindy McGill, Companion Cube, Cory, Daisuke Goto, Daisy Trevino , Daniel Voisine, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Dean Skoglund, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Eric Carter, Geidi Rodriguez, Gerardo Alfaro, Ivan Alexander, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jeanne Sommer, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Kallie Moore, Karen Reynolds, Katherine Schick, Kendall Rasmussen, Kenia Villegas, Kristell Esquivel, KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Michele Wong, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Nicolette Ray, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, riceeater, Richard Shalumov, Rick Wong, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Samuel Bean, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, Sonia Tanlimco, SueEllen McCann, Supernovabetty, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Titania Juang, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim, Yvan Mostaza, ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #bedbug #bedbugtrap #bedbugbite
Meeting a Wormlion Is the Pits | Deep Look Meeting a Wormlion Is the Pits | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Straight out of science fiction, the fearsome wormlion ambushes prey at the bottom of a tidy - and terrifying - sand pit, then flicks their carcasses out. These meals fuel its transformation into something unexpected. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Join our community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Ominous creatures that lurk deep underground in the desert, like the sandworms in the classic science fiction novel "Dune," aren’t just make-believe. For ants and other prey, wormlions are a terrifying reality. While quite small—they can grow up to an inch—wormlions are fly larvae that curl up their bodies like slingshots. Usually found under rock or log overhangs in dry, sandy landscapes, they’ll energetically fling soil, sand and pebbles out of the way to dig pit traps. Once an unlucky critter falls in, wormlions move at lightning speed and quickly wrap their bodies around their victims. Squeezing them like boa constrictors, they also inject them with a paralyzing venom. They feed this way for several years, until they transform into adults. Joyce Gross, a computer programmer for the UC Berkeley Natural History Museums, is fascinated by their unique hunting behavior. “They have such a weird life history," she said. "They're the only flies that dig pits like this, and wait for prey to fall in, just like antlions.” ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1941850/meeting-a-wormlion-is-the-pits --- Are antlions and wormlions related? While they use a similar hunting technique with pitfall traps, they’re actually two separate species. --- How are antlions and wormlions different from each other? Antlions have big jaws, while wormlions have tiny mouthparts typical of other flies. They also dig pits differently. Antlions (genus Myrmeleon) create deeper pits by digging backwards in a spiral-shaped path. ---+ For more information: Read "Demons of the Dust" (1930) by William Morton Wheeler: https://books.google.com/books/about/Demons_of_the_dust.html?id=hrvPAAAAMAAJ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Creepy Crawly Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb26BBvAAWU&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBYF3x2RYLhPH0-tP_u2nRX ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to the following fans for correctly identifying the creature's genus in our community tab challenge: Gar Báge, Phil Conti, Pikaia Battaile, Trinidadmax, and BorderLander . ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! ThePeaceOfBread, Jeremy Gutierrez, Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, Chris B Emrick, Karen Reynolds, Tea Torvinen, m_drunk, David Deshpande, Noah Hess, Daisuke Goto, Companion Cube, WhatzGames, Edwin, ThePeaceOfBread, Richard Shalumov, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, pearsryummy, Samuel Bean, Shirley Washburn, Kristell Esquivel , Jiayang Li, Jeremy Gutierrez, Carlos Zepeda, KW, johanna reis, Robert Warner, Monica Albe, Elizabeth Wolden, Cindy McGill, Sayantan Dasgupta, Robert Amling, Kilillith, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Pamela Parker, Kendall Rasmussen, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Kenia Villegas, Breanna Tarnawsky, Sonia Tanlimco, Bluapex, Ivan Alexander, Allen, Michele Wong, Johnnyonnyful, Tommy Tran, Rick Wong, Dean Skoglund, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Beckie, Jane Orbuch, Nathan Wright, Nathan Padilla, Jason Buberel, Sean Tucker, Carl, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Titania Juang, Daniel Voisine, Michael Mieczkowski, Kyle Fisher, Kirtan Patel, Jeanine Womble, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Kallie Moore, SueEllen McCann, Jeanne Sommer, Edwin Rivas, Geidi Rodriguez, Benjamin Ip, Willy Nursalim, Katherine Schick, Aurora Mitchell, Two Box Fish, Daisy Trevino , Ricardo Martinez, Marjorie D Miller, Ben Espey, Cory, Eric Carter, PM Daeley, Ahegao Comics, Iver Soto, Chris Murphy, Joao Ascensao, Nicolette Ray, Yvan Mostaza, TierZoo, Gerzon ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #wormlion #insect #deeplook
These Face Mites Really Grow on You | Deep Look These Face Mites Really Grow on You | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Yep, you probably have Demodex mites living on your face. These tiny arachnids feast on sebum, the greasy oil in your pores. But should you be worried about your eight-legged guests? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Pretty much every adult human alive has a population of these mites living on them. Also called eyelash mites, they’re too small to see with the naked eye. They’re mostly transparent, and at about .3 millimeters long, it would take about five face adult mites laid end to end to stretch across the head of a pin. Face mites spend their days face-down inside your hair follicles nestled up against the hair shaft. They eat sebum, that greasy oil your skin makes to protect itself and keep it from drying out. That’s why the greasiest parts of your body — like around the eyes, nose and mouth — likely harbor a higher concentration of mites than other areas. They live about two weeks. They spend most of their time tucked inside our pores. But while we’re sleeping, they crawl out onto the surface of our skin to mate before crawling back into our pores to lay their eggs. Fun! --- How common are face mites? Pretty much everyone has some face mites on them. Babies are born without them but quickly receive them from their parents through direct contact. The amount of mites may increase during puberty when the skin starts to produce more oil. --- How do you get rid of face mites? There’s usually no need to try to rid yourself of face mites as they typically don’t cause any symptoms and are nearly impossible to fully eradicate. Since female face mites can also reproduce asexually, it only takes one mite to repopulate your skin. Some people experience an overpopulation of face mites resulting in an inflammatory disease called demodicosis which is easy to recognize sue to the many small evenly-sized pimples that appear quickly. Consult a dermatologist if you think you may have symptoms. --- What do face mites eat? Face mites consume the greasy oil that you skin produces to protect itself. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED https://www.kqed.org/science/1941506/these-face-mites-really-grow-on-you ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb26BBvAAWU&t=1s How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IoOJu2_FKE ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations🏆 to jac lyn, Vanessa C u later, aspireme_95, Émile Julien, and Nono Chan who correctly identified the part of this animal that is, well… missing. Demodex lack an anus! Se the Community Tab post here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgwjkBkGKXBPBVHEJRh4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Ahegao Comics, Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carlos Zepeda, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Companion Cube, Cooper Caraway, Daisuke Goto, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Elizabeth Wolden, Ivan Alexander, Iver Soto, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jenn's Bowtique, Jeremy Lambert, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Karen Reynolds, Kristell Esquivel , KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Lyall Talarico, Mario Rahmani, Marjorie D Miller, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Monica Albe, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, SueEllen McCann, Tatianna Bartlett, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Tommy Tran, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #facemites #demodex #deeplook
Honey Bees Make Honey ... and Bread? | Deep Look Honey Bees Make Honey ... and Bread? | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Honey bees make honey from nectar to fuel their flight – and our sweet tooth. But they also need pollen for protein. So they trap, brush and pack it into baskets on their legs to make a special food called bee bread. JOIN our Deep Look community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Spring means honey bees flitting from flower to flower. This frantic insect activity is essential to growing foods like almonds, raspberries and apples. Bees move pollen, making it possible for plants to grow the fruit and seeds they need to reproduce. But honey bees don’t just move pollen from plant to plant. They also keep a lot for themselves. They carry it around in neat little balls, one on each of their hind legs. Collecting, packing and making pollen into something they can eat is a tough, intricate job that’s essential to the colony’s well-being. Older female adult bees collect pollen and mix it with nectar or honey as they go along, then carry it back to the hive and deposit it in cells next to the developing baby bees, called larvae. This stored pollen, known as bee bread, is the colony’s main source of protein. “You don’t have bees flying along snacking on pollen as they’re collecting it,” said Mark Carroll, an entomologist at the US Department of Agriculture’s Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Tucson. “This is the form of pollen that bees are eating.” --- What is bee bread? It’s the pollen that worker honey bees have collected, mixed with a little nectar or honey and stored within cells in the hive. --- What is bee bread used for? Bee bread is the main source of protein for adult bees and larvae. Young adult bees eat bee bread to make a liquid food similar to mammal’s milk that they feed to growing larvae; they also feed little bits of bee bread to older larvae. --- How do honey bees use their pollen basket? When a bee lands on a flower, it nibbles and licks off the pollen, which sticks to its head. It wipes the pollen off its eyes and antennae with a brush on each of its front legs, using them in tandem like windshield wipers. It also cleans the pollen off its mouth part, and as it does this, it mixes it with some saliva and a little nectar or honey that it carries around in a kind of stomach called a crop. Then the bee uses brushes on its front, middle and hind legs to move the pollen, conveyor-belt style, front to middle to back. As it flies from bloom to bloom, the bee combs the pollen very quickly and moves it into baskets on its hind legs. Each pollen basket, called a corbicula, is a concave section of the hind leg covered by longish hairs that bend over and around the pollen. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1940898/honey-bees-make-honey-and-bread ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to spqr0a, A D2, James Peirce, Armageddonchampion, and Даниил Мерзликин for identifying what our worker bee was putting in a honeycomb cell (and why) - Bee Bread! See more on our Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgygsE43ghZvdVIcn0V4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Ahegao Comics, Allen, Aurora Mitchell, Beckie, Ben Espey, Bill Cass, Breanna Tarnawsky, Carlos Zepeda, Chris B Emrick, Chris Murphy, Companion Cube, Cooper Caraway, Daisuke Goto, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Edwin Rivas, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Elizabeth Wolden, Ivan Alexander, Iver Soto, Jane Orbuch, JanetFromAnotherPlanet, Jason Buberel, Jeanine Womble, Jenn's Bowtique, Jeremy Lambert, Jiayang Li, Joao Ascensao, johanna reis, Johnnyonnyful, Joshua Murallon Robertson, Justin Bull, Karen Reynolds, Kristell Esquivel , KW, Kyle Fisher, Laurel Przybylski, Levi Cai, Lyall Talarico, Mario Rahmani, Marjorie D Miller, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Monica Albe, Nathan Padilla, Nathan Wright, Pamela Parker, PM Daeley, Ricardo Martinez, Robert Amling, Robert Warner, Sayantan Dasgupta, Sean Tucker, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Shirley Washburn, SueEllen McCann, Tatianna Bartlett, Tea Torvinen, TierZoo, Tommy Tran, Two Box Fish, WhatzGames, Willy Nursalim ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED. #honeybees #bee bread #deep look
This Millipede and Beetle Have a Toxic Relationship | Deep Look This Millipede and Beetle Have a Toxic Relationship | Deep Look
2 years ago En
This millipede uses deadly cyanide gas to keep predators at bay. But one beetle can tolerate the toxic defense and rides the millipede like a bucking bronco. Who will win this showdown in the forest? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- Across Northern California, as the rainy season is ending and spring is taking hold, bees are buzzing, flowers are growing and hikers are hitting the trails. But down at ground level, the pastoral scenery is concealing a surprising battle: relentless chemical warfare between bugs. More than 200 species of millipedes emerge from their underground lairs every year during the winter and early spring months to forage for food and seek mates. They have to fend off insects, mammals, reptiles and amphibians looking for a tasty meal. But they have a secret weapon – toxic chemicals they shoot from special glands. One Bay Area species, Xystocheir dissecta, carries deadly cyanide and benzaldehyde. If they’re feeling threatened, these millipedes produce an invisible, odorless hydrogen cyanide gas that they spray at predators, and which is virtually toxic to all organisms. One byproduct is benzaldehyde, which gives off the scent of bitter almonds, as an additional signal that they’re secreting poison. The millipedes don’t poison themselves, however. They’ve developed an immunity. The cyanide can kill nearly any other animal trying to dine on the millipedes. Except one. New research has found that one tough beetle is the only known predator in the world that can survive a direct blast of cyanide gas and keep going. Brandt Weary, an entomologist, studied these hardy beetles last year for his senior thesis at the University of California Berkeley. The beetles, known as Promecognathus crassus, love to eat millipedes, even though they are only one-fifth the millipedes’ size. Weary wanted to know more about how the beetles withstood the millipedes’ tough chemical defense. He found that while many other beetles will avoid the cyanide-spraying millipedes, Promecognathus seeks them out. --- How many legs do millipedes have? Most millipedes have between 34-400 legs, and the record is 750! --- Why do these millipedes “glow” or fluoresce? One theory behind millipede fluorescence is that it's a warning sign. Moonlight has some UV light, so maybe an animal with better night vision can see the fluorescence even if we can't. --- Which millipedes produce cyanide? Only millipedes in the order Polydesmida produce cyanide. It's the largest order of millipedes with about 3500 species. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1939811/this-millipede-and-beetle-have-a-toxic-relationship ---+ For more information: Kip Will at UC Berkeley: https://ourenvironment.berkeley.edu/people/kipling-will Science on the SPOT: Glowing Millipedes of Alcatraz: https://ww2.kqed.org/quest/2013/03/19/science-on-the-spot-the-glowing-millipedes-of-alcatraz/ ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to these fans for suggesting our *5 favorite common names* for Xystocheir dissecta, on our Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugwt2DsvG4dbBa5HPSF4AaABCQ #5 Unom Auhasard: Walking rave stick #4 F E: "Lumilipede" #3 Mr.salty: " hell no" #2 Mystery Bomb Noel: "blue galaxy" #1 Tinkili: "Glowy Feets McGee" ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, Chris B Emrick, Karen Reynolds, Jeremy Lambert, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Bugeyed.fr, WhatzGames, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Robert Warner, Shirley Washburn, Tatianna Bartlett, KW, Tanya Finch, Elizabeth Wolden, Sayantan Dasgupta, Monica Albe, Willy Nursalim, Jenn's Bowtique, Jane Orbuch, Laurel Przybylski, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jason Buberel, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Jeanine Womble, Aurora Mitchell, Edwin Rivas, Marjorie D Miller, Companion Cube, Chris Murphy, Joao Ascensao, Two Box Fish, PM Daeley, TierZoo, Robert Amling, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Mario Rahmani ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #millipede #beetle #deeplook
Porcupines Give You 30,000 Reasons to Back Off | Deep Look Porcupines Give You 30,000 Reasons to Back Off | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Porcupines may be adorable, but their quills are razor-sharp, designed to impale and next to impossible to remove. But it's not all bad news. Researchers are designing new surgical staples that mimic the quill's shape to better close wounds and promote healing. Check our PBS Sound Field! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvMLMyKPomE6kTTL9Kv8Iww Meet Seth Samuel, Deep Look Composer! https://www.patreon.com/posts/25828498 SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. The quills of North American porcupines have microscopic backward-facing barbs on the tips. Those barbs make the quills slide in easy but very difficult to remove. Researchers at Harvard are looking to porcupine quills for inspiration in designing a new type of surgical staple that would also use tiny barbs to keep itself lodged into the patient’s skin. This helps because traditional staples curve in under the skin to keep the staple in place. This creates more damage and can provide a place for bacteria to infect the wound. --- How do porcupines defend themselves? If threatened, a porcupine will bristle, raising its quills. The quills are densest in an area on the porcupine's back called the rosette. The quills are coated in a grease secreted by the porcupine’s skin. When the porcupine exposes its quills it releases a musky odor unique to porcupines that serves as a warning. The porcupine turns so that it’s head faces away from the attacker and chatters its teeth to make an audible warning. If that’s not enough, he porcupine will use its muscular tail, covered in quills, to slap their attacker if they get too close. --- Do porcupines shoot their quills? Porcupines do not shoot their quills out. That’s a myth. Porcupine quills are held by their skin in a way that makes them difficult to fall out unless pushed in first, usually by contact with an attacker. The tail moves so quickly that it can appear that it is shooting the quills out. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2019/04/09/porcupines-give-you-30,000-reasons-to-back-off/ ---+ For more information: Professor Uldis Roze studies North American porcupines at Queens College at the City University of New York: http://biology.qc.cuny.edu/people/faculty/dr-uldis-roze/ Dr. Jeff Karp is developing a new type of surgical staple inspired by the barbs on North American porcupine quills. http://www.karplab.net/portfolio-item/porcupine-inspired-needles ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yb26BBvAAWU&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBpNSC7BIONruffF_ab4cqK&index=47 Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-0SFWPLaII&list=PLdKlciEDdCQBpNSC7BIONruffF_ab4cqK&index=19 ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆Snowcube94, Marley Kang, Mr Spooks, David Bouslov, and NonEuclideanDreams🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the muscle (arrector pili) and a scientific name for the phenomenon known as goose bumps (piloerection, horripilation, or cutis anserina), over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugyape2VJb97x8bM77B4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, Chris B Emrick, Karen Reynolds, Jeremy Lambert, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Bugeyed.fr, WhatzGames, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, Robert Warner, Shirley Washburn, Tatianna Bartlett, KW, Tanya Finch, Elizabeth Wolden, Sayantan Dasgupta, Monica Albe, Willy Nursalim, Jenn's Bowtique, Jane Orbuch, Laurel Przybylski, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jason Buberel, Mark Joshua Bernardo, Michael Mieczkowski, Jeanine Womble, Aurora Mitchell, Edwin Rivas, Marjorie D Miller, Companion Cube, Chris Murphy, Joao Ascensao, Two Box Fish, PM Daeley, TierZoo, Robert Amling, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Mario Rahmani ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look How Lice Turn Your Hair Into Their Jungle Gym | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Why are itchy lice so tough to get rid of and how do they spread like wildfire? They have huge claws that hook on hair perfectly, as they crawl quickly from head to head. JOIN our Deep Look community on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Head lice can only move by crawling on hair. They glue their eggs to individual strands, nice and close to the scalp, where the heat helps them hatch. They feed on blood several times a day. And even though head lice can spread by laying their eggs in sports helmets and baseball caps, the main way they get around is by simply crawling from one head to another using scythe-shaped claws. These claws, which are big relative to a louse’s body, work in unison with a small spiky thumb-like part called a spine. With the claw and spine at the end of each of its six legs, a louse grasps a hair strand to hold on, or quickly crawl from hair to hair like a speedy acrobat. Their drive to stay on a human head is strong because once they’re off and lose access to their blood meals, they starve and die within 15 to 24 hours. --- How do you kill lice? Researchers found in 2016 that lice in the U.S. have become resistant to over-the-counter insecticide shampoos, which contain natural insecticides called pyrethrins, and their synthetic version, known as pyrethroids. Other products do still work against lice, though. Prescription treatments that contain the insecticides ivermectin and spinosad are effective, said entomologist John Clark, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. They’re prescribed to kill both lice and their eggs. Clark said treatments such as suffocants, which block the lice’s breathing holes, and hot-air devices that dry them up, also work. He added that tea tree oil works both as a repellent and a “pretty good” insecticide. Combing lice and eggs out with a special metal comb is also a recommended treatment. --- How long do lice survive? It takes six to nine days for their eggs to hatch and about as long for the young lice to grow up and start laying their own eggs. Adult lice can live on a person’s head for up to 30 days, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). --- Can your pet give you lice? No. Human head lice only live on our heads. They can’t really move to other parts of our body or onto pets. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1939435/how-lice-turn-your-hair-into-their-jungle-gym ---+ For more information: Visit the CDC’s page on head lice: https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/index.html ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IoOJu2_FKE ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆HaileyBubs, Tiffany Haner, cjovani78z, יואבי אייל, and Bellybutton King🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the species and subspecies of insect in this episode over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugwl_PstCaUYdfgvfa54AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Karen Reynolds, Yidan Sun, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, KW, Shirley Washburn, Tanya Finch, johanna reis, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jeanine Womble, Michael Mieczkowski, TierZoo, James Tarraga, Willy Nursalim, Aurora Mitchell, Marjorie D Miller, Joao Ascensao, PM Daeley, Two Box Fish, Tatianna Bartlett, Monica Albe, Jason Buberel ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
Samurai Wasps Say 'Smell Ya Later, Stink Bugs' | Deep Look Samurai Wasps Say 'Smell Ya Later, Stink Bugs' | Deep Look
2 years ago En
Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Yep, brown marmorated stink bugs are stinky, but that’s not the worst thing about them. They're imported agricultural pests eating their way across North America. But a native enemy from Asia – the tiny samurai wasp – has a particularly nasty method of stopping stink bugs in their tracks. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- It looks rather harmless at first glance. With a speckled exterior and a shield-like shape, the brown marmorated stink bug doesn’t appear to be any different from any other six-legged insect that might pop up in your garden. But this particular bug, which arrived in the U.S. from Asia in the mid-1990s and smells like old socks when it is squashed, is a real nuisance. Not only can it invade homes by the thousands in the wintertime, it’s one formidable agricultural pest, eating millions of dollars of peaches, apples and other crops since 2010. Scientists are now investigating a new tactic in the war on the stink bugs: the possibility of relying on one of the bug’s natural enemies, the samurai wasp. Also native to Asia, this parasitic wasp keeps the stink bug population in check there. How? ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1937639/samurai-wasps-say-smell-ya-later-stink-bugs ---+ For more information: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Research at Oregon State University http://bit.ly/2GB8RFs ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: These Hairworms Eat a Cricket Alive and Control Its Mind https://youtu.be/YB6O7jS_VBM Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers https://youtu.be/mHbwC-AIyTE Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers https://youtu.be/9bEjYunwByw ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆to bujur10514, Ace _YT13, Iridescent Moonbeam, Salina Tran, and Noke Noke over at the Deep Look Community Tab, for correctly identifying the term 'Thigmotaxis:' https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgwzgP-aDFmzCVObZZN4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month)! Bill Cass, Justin Bull, Daniel Weinstein, David Deshpande, Daisuke Goto, Karen Reynolds, Yidan Sun, Elizabeth Ann Ditz, KW, Shirley Washburn, Tanya Finch, johanna reis, Shelley Pearson Cranshaw, Johnnyonnyful, Levi Cai, Jeanine Womble, Michael Mieczkowski, SueEllen McCann, TierZoo, James Tarraga, Willy Nursalim, Aurora Mitchell, Marjorie D Miller, Joao Ascensao, PM Daeley, Two Box Fish, Tatianna Bartlett, Monica Albe, Jason Buberel ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #stinkbugs #wildlife
How Your Dog's Nose Knows So Much | Deep Look How Your Dog's Nose Knows So Much | Deep Look
3 years ago En
Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Dogs have a famously great sense of smell, but what makes their noses so much more powerful than ours? They're packing some sophisticated equipment inside that squishy schnozz. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. --- How much more powerful is a dog’s sense of smell compared to a human? According to one estimate, dogs are 10,000-100,000 times more sensitive to smell than humans. They have about 15 times more olfactory neurons that send signals about odors to the brain. The neurons in a dog’s nose are spread out over a much larger and more convoluted area allowing them more easily decipher specific chemicals in the air. --- Why are dog noses wet? Dog noses secrete mucus which traps odors in the air and on the ground. When a dog licks its nose, the tongue brings those odors into the mouth allowing it to sample those smells. Dogs mostly cool themselves by panting but the mucus on their noses and sweat from their paws cool through evaporation. --- Why do dog nostrils have slits on the side? Dogs sniff about five times per second. The slits on the sides allows exhaled air to vent towards the sides and back. That air moving towards the back of the dog creates a low air pressure region in front of it. Air from in front of the dog rushes in to fill that low pressure region. That allows the nose to actively bring odors in from in front and keeps the exhaled air from contaminating new samples. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2019/02/26/how-your-dogs-nose-knows-so-much/ ---+ For more information: The Odor Navigation Project funded NSF Brain Initiative https://odornavigation.org/ Jacobs Lab of Cognitive Biology at UC Berkeley http://jacobs.berkeley.edu/ Ecological Fluid Dynamics Lab at University of Colorado Boulder https://www.colorado.edu/lab/ecological-fluids/ The fluid dynamics of canine olfaction: unique nasal airflow patterns as an explanation of macrosmia (Brent A. Craven, Eric G. Paterson, and Gary S. Settles) https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsif.2009.0490 ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zxqg_um1TXI You've Heard of a Murder of Crows. How About a Crow Funeral? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixYVFZnNl6s&t=85s Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism! | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m37QR_4XNY What Makes Owls So Quiet and So Deadly? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a68fIQzaDBY ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! How James Brown Invented Funk | Sound Field https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AihgZv1D5-4 How To Suck Carbon Dioxide Out of the Sky | Hot Mess https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKtXojkwlK8 What’s the Real Cost of Owning A Pet? | Two Cents https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ma3Mt5BPlTE ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆 to Branden W., Edison Lewis, Vampire Wolf, Haithem Ghanem and Droidtigger who won our GIF CHALLENGE over at the Deep Look Community Tab, by identifying the special region in the canine skull which houses much of the smell ability: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgxG3acWQLcpjNUTlXt4AaABCQ ---+ Thank you to our Top Patreon Supporters ($10+ per month) Bill Cass Justin Bull Daniel Weinstein David Deshpande Daisuke Goto Karen Reynolds Yidan Sun Elizabeth Ann Ditz KW Shirley Washburn Tanya Finch johanna reis Shelley Pearson Cranshaw Johnnyonnyful Levi Cai Jeanine Womble Michael Mieczkowski SueEllen McCann TierZoo James Tarraga Willy Nursalim Aurora Mitchell Marjorie D Miller Joao Ascensao PM Daeley Two Box Fish Tatianna Bartlett Monica Albe Jason Buberel ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED.
These Hairworms Eat a Cricket Alive and Control Its Mind | Deep Look These Hairworms Eat a Cricket Alive and Control Its Mind | Deep Look
3 years ago En
Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook A baby hairworm hitches a ride inside a cricket, feasting on its fat until the coiled-up parasite is ready to burst out. Then it hijacks the cricket's mind and compels it to head to water for a gruesome little swim. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. If you’re out on a hike and look down at a puddle, you might spot a long, brown spaghetti-shaped creature whipping around madly in a figure 8. It’s a hairworm – also known as a horsehair worm or Gordian worm – and researchers have described 350 species around the world. Good news: It isn’t interested in infecting or attacking humans. But if you had happened on the puddle a few hours earlier, you might have witnessed a gruesome spectacle – the hairworm wriggling out of a cricket’s body, pushing its way out like the baby monster in the movie “Alien.” How a hairworm ends up in a puddle, or another water source such as a stream, hot tub or a pet’s water dish, is a complex story. A young hairworm finds its way into a cricket or similar insect like a beetle or grasshopper, and once it’s grown into an adult, the parasite takes over its host’s brain to hitch a ride to the water. As a result of the infection, crickets stop growing and reproducing. Male crickets infected by hairworms even lose their chirp, said Ben Hanelt, a biologist at the University of New Mexico who studies hairworms. --- What *is* a hair worm? A hair worm or hairworm – pick your spelling – is a nematomorph. Nematomorpha are a group of parasites. They’re long, thin worms that can grow to be several meters long inside their host. --- Can humans be infected by hair worms? There are reports of humans and cats and dogs being infected by hair worms, but hair worms aren’t after us or our pets because they can’t grow inside us, said Hanelt. They can only grow inside a host like a cricket or a related insect. “What happens is that a dog, a cat, a human will ingest an adult (hair worm) somehow,” said Hanelt. “Could a cricket crawl in your sandwich before you take a bite? I don’t know. None of the studies that are out there talk about that. What they have been reported to do is to cause in many people intestinal distress.” --- How do hair worms control crickets’ minds? Scientists don’t understand the precise mechanism yet, but they believe that hairworms either boost chemicals in the crickets’ brains or pump chemicals into their brains. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1937775/these-hairworms-eat-a-cricket-alive-and-control-its-mind ---+ For more information: Hairworm Biodiversity Survey: http://www.nematomorpha.net ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHbwC-AIyTE How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU Identical Snowflakes? Scientist Ruins Winter For Everyone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gojddrb70N8 ---+ Follow KQED Science: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆 to Sushant Mendon who won our GIF CHALLENGE over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/user/KQEDDeepLook/community ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #hairworms #wildlife
Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers | Deep Look Jerusalem Crickets Only Date Drummers | Deep Look
3 years ago En
With their big heads and beady black eyes, Jerusalem crickets aren't winning any beauty contests. But that doesn't stop them from finding mates. They use their bulbous bellies to serenade each other with some furious drumming. Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Come join us on our Deep Look Communty Tab: https://www.youtube.com/user/KQEDDeepLook/community -- DEEP LOOK is an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Potato Bug. Child of the Earth. Old Bald-Headed Man. Skull Insects. Devil’s Baby. Spawn of Satan. There’s a fairly long list of imaginative nicknames that refer to Jerusalem crickets, those six-legged insects with eerily humanlike faces and prominent striped abdomens. And they can get quite large, too: Some measure over 3 inches long and weigh more than a mouse, so they can be quite unnerving if you see them crawling around in your backyard in summertime. One individual who finds them compelling, and not creepy, has been studying Jerusalem crickets for over 40 years: David Weissman, a research associate in entomology affiliated with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. He’s now considered the world’s foremost expert, since no one else has been as captivated or singlemindedly devoted to learning more about them. While much of their general behavior is still not widely understood, Jerusalem crickets typically live solitary lives underground. They’ll emerge at night to scavenge for roots, tubers and smaller insects for their meals. And it’s also when they come out to serenade potential partners with a musical ritual: To attract a mate, adult crickets use their abdomens to drum the ground and generate low-frequency sound waves. If a male begins drumming and a female senses the vibrations, she’ll respond with a longer drumming sequence so that he’ll have enough time to track her down. The drumming can vary between one beat every other second up to 40 beats per second. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1932923/jerusalem-crickets-only-date-drummers ---+ For more information: JERUSALEM! CRICKET? (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus); Origins of a Common Name https://goo.gl/Y49GAK ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: The House Centipede is Fast, Furious, and Just So Extra | Deep Look https://youtu.be/q2RtbP1d7Kg Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look https://youtu.be/sj8pFX9SOXE Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers | Deep Look https://youtu.be/9bEjYunwByw ---+ Shoutout! 🏆Congratulations 🏆 to Piss Dog, Trent Geer, Mario Stankovski, Jelani Shillingford, and Chaddydaddy who were the first to correctly 3 the species of Jerusalem Cricket relatives of the Stenopelmatoidea superfamily in our episode, over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgxEuwVr4FmBNg-wtCJ4AaABCQ (hat tip to Antonio Garcia, who shared 3 full species names) ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #jerusalemcrickets #wildlife
Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers | Deep Look Turret Spiders Launch Sneak Attacks From Tiny Towers | Deep Look
3 years ago En
There are strange little towers on the forest floor. Neat, right? Nope. Inside hides a spider that's cunning, patient and ruthless. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Please follow us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Most Bay Area hikers pass right by without ever noticing, but a careful eye can spot tiny towers rising up from the forest floor. These mysterious little tubes, barely an inch high, are the homes of a particularly sneaky predator -- the California turret spider. “To me, the turrets look just like the rook in a chess set,” said Trent Pearce, a naturalist for the East Bay Regional Park District, as he scanned the terrain at Briones Regional Park. “The spiders themselves are super burly – like a tiny tarantula the size of your pinky nail.” Turret spiders build their towers along creek beds and under fallen trees in forested areas throughout Central and Northern California. They use whatever mud, moss, bark and leaves they can find nearby, making their turrets extremely well camouflaged. They line the inside of their tiny castles with pearly white silk, which makes the structure supple and resilient Each turret leads down to a burrow that can extend six inches underground. The spiders spend their days down there in the dark, protected from the sun and predators. As night falls, they climb up to the entrance of the turrets to wait for unsuspecting prey like beetles to happen by. Turret spiders are ambush hunters. While remaining hidden inside their turret, they’re able to sense the vibrations created by their prey’s footsteps. That’s when the turret spider strikes, busting out of the hollow tower like an eight legged jack-in-the-box. With lightning speed the spider swings its fangs down like daggers, injecting venom into its prey before dragging it down into the burrow. “It’s like the scene in a horror movie where the monster appears out of nowhere – you can’t not jump,” Pearce said. --- What do turret spiders eat? Turret spiders mostly ground-dwelling arthropods like beetles but they will also attack flying insects like moths that happen to land near their turrets. --- Are turret spiders dangerous to people? Turret spiders are nocturnal so it’s rare for them to interact with humans by accident. They tend to retreat into their underground burrow if they feel the vibrations of human footsteps. They do have fangs and venom but are not generally considered to be dangerous compared to other spiders. If you leave them alone, you shouldn’t have anything to fear from turret spiders. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2019/01/15/turret-spiders-launch-sneak-attacks-from-tiny-towers/ ---+ For more information: Learn to Look for Them, and California’s Unique “Turret Spiders” are Everywhere https://baynature.org/article/and-this-little-spider-stayed-home/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: For These Tiny Spiders, It's Sing or Get Served | Deep Look https://youtu.be/y7qMqAgCqME Praying Mantis Love is Waaay Weirder Than You Think | Deep Look https://youtu.be/EHo_9wnnUTE Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker | Deep Look https://youtu.be/NpJNeGqExrc ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆Iset4, MidKnight Fall7, jon pomeroy, Justin Felder3, and DrowsyTaurus26🏆, who were the first to correctly ID the species of spider in our episode - Antrodiaetus riversi (also known as Atypoides riversi) over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgxFKwljdtKxxD-xY6V4AaABCQ (hat tip to Edison Lewis10 for posting the entire family tree!) ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #spiders #wildlife
Whack! Jab! Crack! It's a Blackback Land Crab Smackdown | Deep Look Whack! Jab! Crack! It's a Blackback Land Crab Smackdown | Deep Look
3 years ago En
It's an all-out brawl for prime beach real estate! These Caribbean crabs will tear each other limb from limb to get the best burrow. Luckily, they molt and regrow lost legs in a matter of weeks, and live to fight another day. You can learn more about CuriosityStream at https://curiositystream.com/deeplook Help Deep Look grow by supporting us on Patreon!! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook PBS Digital Studios Mega-playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqKjV9WNrIXRphDssM4gu0J DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. On the sand-dune beaches where they live, male blackback land crabs do constant battle over territory. The stakes are high: If one of these baby-faced crabs secures a winning spot, he can invite a mate into his den, six or seven feet beneath the surface. With all this roughhousing, more than feelings get hurt. The male crabs inevitably lose limbs and damage their shells in constant dust-ups. Luckily, like many other arthropods, a group that includes insects and spiders, these crabs can release a leg or claw voluntarily if threatened. It’s not unusual to see animals in the field missing two or three walking legs. The limbs regrow at the next molt, which is typically once a year for an adult. When a molt cycle begins, tiny limb buds form where a leg or a claw has been lost. Over the next six to eight weeks, the buds enlarge while the crab reabsorbs calcium from its old shell and secretes a new, paper-thin one underneath. In the last hour of the cycle, the crab gulps air to create enough internal pressure to pop open the top of its shell, called the carapace. As the crab pushes it way out, the same internal pressure helps uncoil the new legs. The replacement shell thickens and hardens, and the crab eats the old shell. --- Are blackback land crabs edible? Yes, but they’re not as popular as the major food species like Dungeness and King crab. --- Where do blackback land crabs live? They live throughout the Caribbean islands. --- Does it hurt when they lose legs? Hard to say, but they do have an internal mechanism for releasing limbs cleanly that prevents loss of blood. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1933532/whack-jab-crack-its-a-blackback-land-crab-smackdown ---+ For more information: The Crab Lab at Colorado State University: https://rydberg.biology.colostate.edu/mykleslab/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Want a Whole New Body? Ask This Flatworm How https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m12xsf5g3Bo Daddy Longlegs Risk Life ... and Especially Limb ... to Survive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjDmH8zhp6o ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Origin of Everything: The Origin of Gender https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5e12ZojkYrU Hot Mess: Coral Reefs Are Dying. But They Don’t Have To. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUAsFZuFQvQ ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. ---+ Shoutout! Congratulations to 🏆Jen Wiley🏆, who was the first to correctly ID the species of crab in our episode over at the Deep Look Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgyCnadHtKVPOgEmp-d4AaABCQ #deeplook #pbsds #crab
Want a Whole New Body? Ask This Flatworm How | Deep Look Want a Whole New Body? Ask This Flatworm How | Deep Look
3 years ago En
Planarians are tiny googly-eyed flatworms with an uncanny ability: They can regrow their entire bodies, even a new head. So how do they do it? You can learn more about CuriosityStream at https://curiositystream.com/deeplook Support Deep Look on Patreon!! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Nelson Hall wants you to know that the googly-eyed flatworm he just sliced into four pieces is going to be OK. Three of the flatworm’s four pieces have started to wriggle away from each other and its head is moving in circles under Hall’s microscope. “The head will just go off and do its own thing,” said Hall, a doctoral student of bioengineering at Stanford University. But in three weeks, the head, as well as the other pieces, will each have grown into a complete flatworm just like the one Hall sliced up, dark brown and about a half-inch long. Hall and researchers around the world are hard at work trying to understand how these flatworms, called planarians, use powerful stem cells to regenerate their entire bodies, an ability humans can only dream of. Animals like starfish, salamanders and crabs can regrow a tail or a leg. Planarians, on the other hand, can regrow their entire bodies – even their heads, which only a few animals can do. ---What is the difference between healing and regeneration? When we suffer a severe injury, the best we can hope for is that our wounds will heal. “Healing is more like closing the wound and cleaning debris. It’s too short of a process to have tissue replacement,” said Hall. “Regeneration is replacing the tissue that was lost.” ---What are pluripotent stem cells? If planarians can regrow body parts, why can’t we? Key to planarians’ regenerative ability are powerful cells called pluripotent stem cells, which make up one-fifth of their bodies and can grow into every new body part. Humans only have pluripotent stem cells during the embryonic stage, before birth. After that, we mostly lose our ability to sprout new organs. “We have a couple of tissues that can regenerate, like the liver, the outer layers of the skin and the inner layers of the intestine, and the bone marrow,” said Dr. Stephen Badylak, Deputy Director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. “But the way we heal most tissues is by forming scar tissue.” Scientists hope that studying planarians could lead to treatments for humans in which our stem cells could be coaxed one day to regrow severed limbs or sick organs. ---How to grow a fingertip. Doctors are limited in what they can currently do to help people who lose a limb or part of one. Badylak, who doesn’t study planarians, has developed a treatment at the University of Pittsburgh that helps patients regrow their fingertips after an accident. He applies a powder made of animal collagen and substances that stimulate cells to grow, to help form a scaffold that attracts stem cells from the parts of the nail that weren’t cut off. The stem cells regrow the fingertip, which isn’t identical to the one that was cut off, but is functional. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1933246/want-a-whole-new-body-ask-this-flatworm-how ---+ For more information: Regeneration in Nature: Francesc Cebrià’s blog on animal regeneration: https://regenerationinnature.wordpress.com ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Daddy Longlegs Risk Life ... and Especially Limb ... to Survive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjDmH8zhp6o Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-0SFWPLaII These Fighting Fruit Flies Are Superheroes of Brain Science https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvd3X1N0jUU ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! Reactions: Why Tardigrades are Some of the Most Hardcore Critters on the Planet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEW1_Pba3z4 It’s Okay to Be Smart: Is Height All In Our Genes? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cuO5OSDMbw ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the Templeton Religion Trust, the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation and the members of KQED. #deeplook #planaria #flatworm
A Sand Dollar's Breakfast is Totally Metal | Deep Look A Sand Dollar's Breakfast is Totally Metal | Deep Look
3 years ago En
Their skeletons are prized by beachcombers, but sand dollars look way different in their lives beneath the waves. Covered in thousands of purple spines, they have a bizarre diet that helps them exploit the turbulent waters of the sandy sea floor. Please follow us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Pristine white sand dollars have long been the souvenir to commemorate a successful day at the beach. But most people who pick them up don’t realize that they’ve collected the skeleton of an animal, washed up at the end of a long life. As it turns out, scientists say there’s a lot to be said about a sand dollar’s life. That skeleton -- also known as a test -- is really a tool, a remarkable feat of engineering that allows sand dollars to thrive on the shifting bottom of the sandy seafloor, an environment that most other sea creatures find inhospitable. “They've done something really amazing and different,” said Rich Mooi, a researcher with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. “They’re a pile of novelties, and they’ve gone way off the deep end in modifying their bodies to adapt to where they live.” Mooi studies echinoderms, a word that roughly translates to “hedgehog skin.” It’s an aptly-fitting name for a group that includes sea urchins, sand dollars, sea stars and sea cucumbers. But Mooi says sand dollars really have his heart, in part because of their incredible adaptations. --- What are sand dollars? Sand dollars belong to a group of animals called Echinoderms that includes some more familiar animals like starfish and sea urchins. Sand dollars are actually a type of flattened sea urchin with miniaturized spines and tube feet more suited to sandy seafloors. --- What do sand dollars eat? Sand dollars consume sand but they get actual nutrition from the layer of algae and bacteria that coat the grains, not the sand itself. --- Are sand dollars alive? Why do they Turn White? When sand dollars are alive, they are covered in tiny tube feet and spines that make them appear like fuzzy discs. When they die, they lose their spines and tube feet exposing their white skeleton that scientists call a test. That skeleton is typically what people find on the beach. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1932072/a-sand-dollars-breakfast-is-totally-metal/ ---+ For more information: Learn more about Chris Lowe’s work with plankton including sand dollars and their relatives http://lowe.stanford.edu/ Rich Mooi’s research into sand dollars for California Academy of Sciences https://www.calacademy.org/learn-explore/science-heroes/rich-mooi ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: The Amazing Life of Sand | Deep Look https://youtu.be/VkrQ9QuKprE For Pacific Mole Crabs It's Dig or Die | Deep Look https://youtu.be/tfoYD8pAsMw This Adorable Sea Slug is a Sneaky Little Thief | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLVfWKxtfow&t=112s ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! These Tiny Cells Shape Your Life | BrainCraft https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnx-Qvx_fA8 What are Eye Boogers? | Reactions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3M8p-QCC7I ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED. ---+ SHOUT OUTS Here are the winners from our episode image quiz posted in our channel Community Tab: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=Ugyk9txDEOltWx4lx9F4AaABCQ 🏆#1: Tektyx Was the first to correctly ID the creature in our episode was a sand dollar. 🏆#2: tichu7 Was the first to ID what kind of sand dollar it was, the Pacific sand dollar. 🏆#3: Miguel Gomez Also posted what kind of sand dollar it was was, but by another name: Eccentric sand dollar. 🏆#4: Gir Gremlin The first viewer to identify the sand dollar by its scientific name: Dendraster excentricus!
The House Centipede is Fast, Furious, and Just So Extra | Deep Look The House Centipede is Fast, Furious, and Just So Extra | Deep Look
3 years ago En
Please follow us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Take the PBSDS survey: https://to.pbs.org/2018YTSurvey Voracious, venomous and hella leggy, house centipedes are masterful predators with a knack for fancy footwork. But not all their legs are made for walking, they put some to work in other surprising ways. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: an ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Recognizable for their striking (some might say, repulsive) starburst-like shape, house centipedes have far fewer than the 100 legs their name suggests. They’re born with a modest eight, a count that grows to 30 as they reach adulthood. If 30 legs sound like more than one critter really needs – perhaps it is. Over the last 450 million years or so, when centipedes split off from other arthropods, evolution has turned some of those walking limbs into other useful and versatile tools. When it hunts, for example, the house centipede uses its legs as a rope to restrain prey in a tactic called “lassoing.” The tip of each leg is so finely segmented and flexible that it can coil around its victim to prevent escape. The centipede’s venom-injecting fangs, called forciples, are also modified legs. Though shorter and thicker than the walking limbs, they are multi-jointed , which makes them far more dexterous than the fangs of insects and spiders, which hinge in only one plane. Because of this dexterity, the centipede’s forciples not only inject venom, but also hold prey in place while the centipede feeds. Then they take a turn as a grooming tool. The centipede passes its legs through the forciples to clean and lubricate their sensory hairs. Scientists have long noticed that because of their length and the fact that the centipede holds them aloft when it walks, these back legs give the appearance of a second pair antennae. The house centipede looks like it has two heads. In evolution, when an animal imitates itself, it’s called automimicry. Automimicry occurs in some fish, birds and butterflies, and usually serves to divert predators. New research suggests that’s not the whole story with the house centipede. Electron microscopy conducted on the centipede’s legs has revealed as many sensory hairs, or sensilla, on them as on the antennae. The presence of so many sensory hairs suggest the centipede’s long back legs are not merely dummies used in a defensive ploy, but serve a special function, possibly in mate selection. During courtship, both the male and female house centipede slowly raise and lower their antennae and back legs, followed by mutual tapping and probing. --- Are house centipedes dangerous? Though they do have venom, house centipedes don’t typically bite humans. --- Where do house centipedes live? House centipedes live anywhere where the humidity hovers around 90 percent. That means the moist places in the house: garages, bathrooms, basements. Sometimes their presence can indicate of a leaky roof or pipe. --- Do house centipedes have 100 legs? No. An adult house centipede has 30. Only one group of centipedes, called the soil centipedes, actually have a hundred legs or more. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2018/09/25/the-house-centipede-is-fast-furious-and-hella-leggy ---+ For more information: Visit the centipede page of the Natural History Museum, London: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/our-work/origins-evolution-and-futures/centipede-systematics.html ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Kittens Go From Clueless to Cute https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1xRlkNwQy8 This Adorable Sea Slug is a Sneaky Little Thief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLVfWKxtfow ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Origin of Everything: Why Do People Have Pets? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2nW7_2VUMc Hot Mess: What if Carbon Emissions Stopped Tomorrow? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4kX9xKGeEw ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.
How Kittens Go From Clueless to Cute | Deep look How Kittens Go From Clueless to Cute | Deep look
3 years ago En
Please support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Take the PBSDS survey: https://to.pbs.org/2018YTSurvey Fluffy kittens chasing a ball are beyond adorable -- but they sure aren't born that way. Practically deaf and blind, in their first few weeks they need constant warmth and milk to survive. This is a huge challenge for animal shelters, so they're working with researchers on ways to help motherless kittens flourish. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. -- Every year, hundreds of thousands of kittens end up in animal shelters, in need of permanent homes. But raising orphaned newborns into healthy, fluffy, frisky two-month-olds ready to be adopted requires an enormous behind-the-scenes effort. All across the country, volunteer foster parents log many sleepless nights bottle-feeding kittens every few hours. So researchers and shelters are trying to figure out ways to make it easier. “A lot of people think fostering is taking kittens home and playing with them,” said Penny Dougherty, chief executive director of Kitten Central of Placer County, an animal shelter she runs from her house in Newcastle, California, 30 miles northeast of Sacramento. Kitten Central receives most of its kittens from Placer County Animal Services. Dougherty cares for kittens up to one month old, as well as feral and stray cats with litters. Once the kittens weigh at least two pounds and have been spayed and neutered, she returns them to the agency so they can put them up for adoption. “They’re very happy to have our services,” said Dougherty, “because so many shelters have to euthanize.” When the days start getting longer, around January, cats start breeding. March is the beginning of what’s known among shelters as “kitten season.” The flow of kittens doesn’t slow down until November. “Kitten season is kind of one of the banes of shelter existence,” said Cynthia Delany, supervising shelter veterinarian at Yolo County Animal Services, in Woodland, west of Sacramento. “Six or seven months out of the year we’re just flooded with these little guys.” To steer clear of inundating shelters with newborn kittens, Delany’s advice is to leave any litters you might encounter alone unless they’re in immediate danger. Most of the time their mom will return, she said, so check back periodically. In an effort to lessen the load on foster parents and increase newborn kittens’ chances of survival, Mikel Maria Delgado, a postdoctoral researcher in the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California, Davis, is joining forces with Kitten Central and other animal shelters to figure out if there are optimum temperature and humidity levels that make it possible to feed newborn kittens less frequently. She has distributed incubators to the groups so that two or three kittens can be kept in each one for about three weeks. ---How long do kittens' eyes stay closed? During the first week-and-a-half of their lives, kittens’ eyes are sealed closed and their ears are folded up, making them practically blind and deaf. They’re born this way because their brains aren’t developed enough to use those senses. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1930803/how-kittens-go-from-clueless-to-cute ---+ For more information: If you find a litter of newborn kittens: https://eastbayspca.org/get-involved/community-resources/feral-cats/stray-cats-feral-cats-kittens/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Why Does Your Cat’s Tongue Feel Like Sandpaper? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9h_QtLol75I&t=24s Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPbH1YhsdP8 ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! It’s Okay to Be Smart: Why Do Disney Princesses All Look Like Babies? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1gzpEktyKo PBS Eons: The Story of Saberteeth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbjIhPHRZgc ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.
This Adorable Sea Slug is a Sneaky Little Thief | Deep Look This Adorable Sea Slug is a Sneaky Little Thief | Deep Look
3 years ago En
Take the PBSDS survey: https://to.pbs.org/2018YTSurvey Explore our VR slug and support us on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Nudibranchs may look cute, squishy and defenseless ... but watch out. These brightly-colored sea slugs aren't above stealing weapons from their prey. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. The summer months bring low morning tides along the California coast, providing an opportunity to see one of the state’s most unusual inhabitants, sea slugs. Also called nudibranchs, many of these relatives of snails are brightly colored and stand out among the seaweed and anemones living next to them in tidepools. “Some of them are bright red, blue, yellow -- you name it,” said Terry Gosliner, senior curator of invertebrate zoology and geology at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. “They're kind of designer slugs.” But without a protective shell, big jaws or sharp claws, how do these squishy little creatures get away with such flamboyant colors in a habitat full of predators? As it turns out, the nudibranchs’ colors serve as a warning to predators: These sea slugs are packing some very sophisticated defenses. And some aren’t above stealing weapons from their prey. Gosliner and Brenna Green and Emily Otstott, graduate students at San Francisco State University, were out at dawn earlier this summer searching tidepools and floating docks around the Bay Area. They want to learn more about how these delicate little sea slugs survive and how changing ocean temperatures might threaten their futures. Nudibranchs come in a staggering variety of shapes and sizes. Many accumulate toxic or bad-tasting chemicals from their prey, causing predators like fish and crabs to learn that the flashy colors mean the nudibranch wouldn’t make a good meal. --- What are nudibranchs? Nudibranchs are snails that lost their shell over evolutionary time. Since they don’t have a shell for protection, they have to use other ways to defend themselves like accumulating toxic chemicals in their flesh to make them taste bad to predators. Some species of nudibranchs eat relatives of jellyfish and accumulate the stingers within their bodies for defense. --- Why do nudibranchs have such bright colors? The bright colors serve as a signal to the nudibranch’s predators that they are not good to eat. If a fish or crab bites a nudibranch, it learns to associate the bad taste with the bright colors which tends to make them reluctant to bite a nudibranch with those colors in the future. --- What does nudibranch mean? The word nudibranch comes from Latin. It means naked gills. They got that name because some species of nudibranchs have an exposed ring of gills on their back that they use to breath. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1929993/this-adorable-sea-slug-is-a-sneaky-little-thief ---+ For more information: Learn more about Terry Gosliner’s work with nudibranchs https://www.calacademy.org/staff/ibss/invertebrate-zoology-and-geology/terrence-gosliner Learn more about Chris Lowe’s work with plankton http://lowe.stanford.edu/ Learn more about Jessica Goodheart’s study of nematocyst sequestration https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ivb.12154 ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton | Deep Look https://youtu.be/jUvJ5ANH86I For Pacific Mole Crabs It's Dig or Die | Deep Look https://youtu.be/tfoYD8pAsMw The Amazing Life of Sand | Deep Look https://youtu.be/VkrQ9QuKprE ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! Why Are Hurricanes Getting Stronger? | Hot Mess https://youtu.be/2E1Nt7JQRzc When Fish Wore Armor | Eons https://youtu.be/5pVTZH1LyTw Why Do We Wash Our Hands After Going to the Bathroom? | Origin of Everything https://youtu.be/fKlpGs34-_g ---+ Follow KQED Science and Deep Look: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kqedscience/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience KQED Science on kqed.org: http://www.kqed.org/science Facebook Watch: https://www.facebook.com/DeepLookPBS/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/deeplook ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED. #deeplook #nudibranch #seaslug
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