Learn English with Alex [engVid]
If you want to learn English, you've come to the right place. I have beginner, intermediate, and advanced lessons on a variety of subjects. Whether you want to improve your English vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, listening, writing, or speaking ability, you will find something to help you here. I also have lessons on English proficiency tests like IELTS and TOEFL. I hope you enjoy practicing your English with my channel! Regarding myself, I have been an English as a Second Language teacher since 2007, and I've taught a variety of age groups and nationalities. I currently teach in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. If you never want to miss a lesson, subscribe to the channel, and check me out on Facebook and Twitter. Thanks for studying with engVid!

113 videos
Improve your Vocabulary: 10 common word combinations in English Improve your Vocabulary: 10 common word combinations in English
3 weeks ago En
Some words just sound better together. In this practical English vocabulary lesson, you will learn 10 common noun + noun combinations that are frequently used by English speakers. These include: pros and cons, odds and ends, peace and quiet, ups and downs, and more! Improve your understanding of these phrases and you'll be able to understand and participate in more English conversations. Watch my video about COLLECTIVE NOUNS next: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meMx5IxuG-4&index=24&list=PLrPhmmx5j5b-AjltXcrLI4iiqF7lsj_P8 TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/10-common-word-combinations/ TRANSCRIPT Okay. Yeah, I could go anywhere I want. Okay, but it's really big and I don't have the space. Oh, hey, guys. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Common Word Pairs", specifically common noun and noun pairs. So, before, you know, I started this, I was looking at my phone because I'm trying to think about the pros and cons of buying a hot air balloon, and I'm not really sure whether I want it or not, so I'm trying to weigh the pluses and the minuses, the pros and the cons. Speaking of pros and cons, pluses and minuses, this is the first word pair in our noun and noun set. So: "pros and cons", "pluses and minuses" basically mean the advantages and disadvantages of something. "What are the pros and cons?" When you're buying something, you're thinking about the pluses and the minuses of this thing; the pros and the cons of this thing. When you make an important life decision, you also have to weigh the pros (the pluses) and the cons (the minuses). Okay? So, these are the benefits or the disadvantages of something. Next: "odds and ends". So, "odds and ends": "That box is full of odds and ends." Let me show you. Come here. Come here. Okay, so I got an eraser, I got a stapler, there's a remote of some kind, I think these are bubbles, Superman bubbles, marker, cloth. So, these things are not really related, but I don't have a box in my house or a drawer in my house just for erasers, or just for markers, or just for staplers, so the odds and ends of something usually just refer to the random pieces, the random articles, the junk, the miscellaneous junk. So: "That box is full of odds and ends." So I'm just going to put: Random stuff or random junk. Basically things you don't have a set place for in your house, so you just put it in one area. Yeah, the batteries, the paperclips, the tape, the pencils, odds and ends, just random stuff. All right: "ups and downs". "They've had a lot of ups"... Ups and downs. I think you can tell what this means. It basically means they've had a lot of good times and a lot of bad times. So, good times and bad times. Good times and bad times. Now, this can refer to... You can use it in many contexts, specifically the most common being when you talk about relationships. Also, you can talk about a company's history, so the company has experienced many ups and downs. The relationship has gone through ups and downs. So, good times and bad times. Next: "peace and quiet". So these commonly go together. "We could all use a little more peace and quiet." So, if you know the meaning of "peace", you know the meaning of "quiet", you just know this means a period of calm. Okay? So, I love peace and quiet. I need peace and quiet. I want peace and quiet. So, basically let's just say calmness, something... Period of calm. A period of calm. "Trial and error". So, here: "We went through a long trial and error process." So, if you are working in a company and your company gives you a project, and they want you to find out the pros and cons of doing something, and they go through a long experimentation process with whatever they're working on. So, some things work, some things don't work. Or if you're trying to create, let's say a specific type of machine or a robot, but you don't know what happens if you do one thing or if you do another thing. So, "trial" means to try or experiment, and "error", to make mistakes. So this is a long process where you do experiments, and you make many mistakes before you find the final solution, you find what works. So: "trial and error" always refers to some kind of process where you're experimenting with solutions. Experimentation process. Okay. So, just like when you're learning English, you know, sometimes you just have to try speaking if you're speaking with a native speaker and you're not sure if you're using the correct verb form or if you're using the correct noun form, you're kind of going through a trial and error process, and maybe your friend says: -"No, no. Don't say: 'It is danger.' Say: 'It is dangerous.'" -"Ah, now I know it is 'dangerous', not 'It is danger.'" Okay? So, one, two, three, four, five. I think I said we're doing ten of these. Wow. […]
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English Grammar & Vocabulary: Permanent Plurals English Grammar & Vocabulary: Permanent Plurals
1 month ago En
There are some nouns in English that are simply ALWAYS plural. These are nouns like "glasses," "scissors," "pants," "jeans," "clothes," and several others, all of which are covered in this practical English grammar lesson. Do count and non-count nouns confuse you? This lesson that will make the topic easier for you. So what are you waiting for? If you want to erase some of your doubts and use grammar and vocabulary more accurately, this video will do the trick. Thanks for clicking, and don't forget to check out the quiz after the video to test your understanding of the material: https://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-vocabulary-permanent-plurals/ TRANSCRIPT [Exhales] So hot today. You know what? I don't need pants for this video. Whew. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Nouns That Are Always Plural". So, if you know anything about count and noncount nouns, you know that count nouns can be singular or plural. "Cup", "cups"; "table", "tables"; "school", "schools". But there are some nouns... The list is not very long, but there are some nouns that always stay plural, that only have a plural form, and today I'm going to talk about them. Now, I know some of you might have some issues, you know, trying to memorize some of these things, but after today's lesson, I promise you: You're going to feel a lot better, a lot more confident, and you will be able to use these nouns correctly and confidently, which is really important, obviously, when you're learning and speaking a language. So... Whew. That's better. I feel the air now. I feel the air. So: "clothes", the word "clothes" itself is permanently plural. Right? So you can say: "I have too many clothes." Not: "too much clothes", because even though it only has one form, some people say: "Do I have too much clothes or too many clothes?" No, it's a plural, permanently plural, so you use "many" with the noun "clothes". Okay? So: "I have too many clothes." You can't say... Do not say: "I have two clothes", or: "to clothes-es-es", don't do it. Okay? So, just: "I have a lot of clothes. I need new clothes. I need some new clothes." That's okay. If you want to count clothes, there is a way, but you don't use the word "clothes", you use the word "clothing" and you use the quantifier expression of "articles of clothing". Okay? So: "There are 3 new articles of clothing in my closet." Otherwise: "clothes". "I have a lot of clothes, too many clothes." Okay? "I need new clothes." Continuing on, I've separated the second part of this video into three sections. One: leg stuff; two: other stuff; three: other other stuff. By the way, "leg stuff" is not a technical term at all, but stick with me. So, basically anything that you can, like, pull up on your legs, like the pants that I had and I no longer have, you can use in a permanent plural. Okay? So, what are some examples of leg stuff, things you can put on your legs? One, very general: "pants". Okay? You can say: "I need new pants." If you want to count pants or any of the other things I'm going to talk about related to clothes, you can also say: "I need a new pair". So, "a pair" means two. Now, again, legs have... Leg stuff, pants, jeans, etc., you have two legs and you put one and then the other, so this is a pair. So you can say: "I need a new pair of pants", or "a new pair of jeans", or "a new pair of shorts", for example. And you can also just say: "I need new pants", "new shorts", "new jeans", "new overalls". If you don't know what "overalls" are, I've drawn you a little picture. If you know Super Mario Brothers, Super Mario and Luigi wear overalls. A lot of, you know, people who work in factories have to wear clothes that cover their whole bodies from the legs all the way up, these are overalls. "Leggings", so leggings and "tights", these are very similar. When you think of leggings, think of tights. You might think of a Shakespearean theatre, a Shakespearean play where the actors wear really tight, tight, tight, thin layers of pants to cover their legs, and usually they cover your feet as well. Right? So, yeah, leggings, tights. And "shorts". Now, you might be thinking: "Well, Alex, what about that other thing that you put underneath your clothes that you're wearing?" that I'm wearing now, which is underwear. Okay? Underwear is an exception to this rule. We don't say, you know: "underwears" all the time, it's just "underwear" without a plural. Okay? But you still say: "two pairs of underwear", "three pairs of underwear", but just there's no "s" on the end of it. Okay? So, just for pronunciation, just repeat after me with these words, guys: "pants", "jeans", "overalls", "shorts", "tights", "leggings". All right, continuing on with this, you can also say with other stuff that: "You need new", or "You need a new pair of scissors." You use scissors to cut-right?-in school, or at home. Or: "a new pair of glasses". So, I have a pair of glasses here. […]
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30 English Phrasal Verb Commands 30 English Phrasal Verb Commands
2 months ago En
"How do I use phrasal verbs?" This is one of the most common questions that intermediate and advanced English students ask. In this lesson, I will teach you 30 common phrasal verbs that you can use as commands. Each phrasal verb also has useful examples, and you can check your understanding with a massive thirty-question quiz at https://www.engvid.com/30-english-phrasal-verb-commands/ after you've watched the lesson! To give you a taste of this lesson, you will learn phrasal verb commands like: move over, gather around, chill out, listen up, hang on, get back, drink up, come on, carry on, back up, and many more! So what are you waiting for? Gather around, listen up, and carry on improving your English language skills. Next, watch Rebecca's video on 10 easy commands! https://youtube.com/watch?v=yPZJe_5mxR8 Get the resource with 100 PHRASAL VERBS: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/100-phrasal-verbs-used-as-commands/ TRANSCRIPT -"Let me see your identification." -"You don't need to see his identification." -"We don't need to see his identification." -"These aren't the droids you're looking for." -"These aren't the droids we're looking for." -"He can go about his business." -"You can go about your business." -"Move along." -"Move along." Yeah. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this lesson on "30 Phrasal Verb Commands". So, simple enough. Right? You're going to hear 30 commands that use phrasal verbs, and I will tell you the context in which you can use each one, and we'll do some very quick pronunciation and repeat-after-me practice as well. Now, after this lesson, if you can't get enough of phrasal verb commands, you can check out the resource that Rebecca made where she lists 100 phrasal verb commands. And she also has another video that is linked to this video where you can get, you know, a lesson on 10 more commands, similar to these ones right behind me. So, let's not waste any more time and we're going to go, one, two, three, four, five, six, all the way to 30 and we'll do it relatively quickly with an example and an explanation of the context for each. So, the first one, repeat after me: "Back off." This is what you say when you want someone to, you know, get out of your personal space. So, usually if you are annoyed at the individual, you could say: "Back off. You are too close to me." Okay? Next: "Back up." Now, "back up" is similar to "back off", but it can be used in a more formal situation by someone, like, you know, a police officer or a security guard. So, for example, if there is, you know, a line where another line is formed and you cannot cross this line, and you do cross that line, you know, a police officer or a security guard or someone might ask you to: "Back up. Back up." This means: Go back a little bit, take a few steps back. They probably won't say: "Back off". "Back off" is much stronger, so you can use: "Back up" in a more formal situation where you want the person to move out of the way and to move back a little bit. Okay? So: "Back up. Just move back, everybody." Okay? Next: "Carry on." So, repeat after me: "Carry on." This simply means continue, do what you were doing before. So: "Carry on. Carry on." Next, repeat after me: "Chill out." This just means: "Be calm, relax. Okay? I see you're upset. Chill out." Okay? So: "chill" comes from, like, you know, to cool, to be calmer. Don't get so hot. Be calm, be cool, chill out. Next, repeat: "Come back." This simply means return. Okay? So: "Hey. Come back. Come back. Return." Next: "Come on." So, this can mean to come, follow me. "Come on. Let's go." Or, if you don't, you know, believe a person's story or you want to show surprise, you can say: "Come on. Really? Come on." Okay, next: "Come in." So, if you have invited someone to your house, you open the door and you want to, you know, invite them to enter your house, you can say: "Come in." All right? So repeat it: "Come in." Next: "Come over." So, if you are inviting a person to your house, you're talking to them on the phone and you want them to come to where you are, usually it's your house, but it could be another place like your work or a caf� somewhere, but usually it's, you know, their house, you can say: "Hey. Come over. I'm free now." Or: "Come over in ten minutes." Okay? So this means: Come to where I am. Usually it's the person's house. "Yeah, you can come over. Come over." Give a command. Next: "Dream on. Dream on. Dream..." You know, the Aerosmith song from the 70s or... I think it was the 70s. And, "to dream on" basically means you don't believe what this person is saying or they have this big, big impossible dream in their head or something, like: -"Oh, I'm going to play this lottery ticket and I'm going to win the lottery this weekend. That's my plan for the weekend." -"Dream on." Okay? So, this means: "Keep dreaming, continue to dream. I don't believe you." All right? Next: "Drink up." So, repeat: "Drink up." […]
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English Modals: 4 ways to use "SHOULD" English Modals: 4 ways to use "SHOULD"
3 months ago En
Most people only use "should" for advice. However, did you know that you can also use it to talk about your expectations and past regrets? Not only that, but you can even use it to make your statements less certain. Learn to use should for MORE than just advice, and master this common and useful English modal verb. Now, watch my video on 4 TYPES OF 'HOW' QUESTIONS IN ENGLISH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_ro9075G2Q&list=PLrPhmmx5j5b-AjltXcrLI4iiqF7lsj_P8&index=5 TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/english-modals-4-ways-to-use-should/ TRANSCRIPT So come on and let me know: Should I stay or should I go? Oh, hey, everyone. One sec. Didn't see you there. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "4 Ways to Use 'Should'". Now, you are probably familiar with at least two of these ways if you have been studying English for a while. So the most common ways are the first two up here, and then we're going to look at two other ways that might be a little less familiar to you. So, let's start with the first, the very first way that every student learns how to use "should" when they're studying English, which is for present or future advice. Now, the structure for this is "should" or "should not" if you're making a negative sentence, plus the base verb. So you have your subject: "I", "you", "he", "she", "it", "we", "they", "Mark", "Paul", "my mom", "your mom", whatever, plus this structure. So let's look at some examples of present or future advice. "You should call him." So you're giving the advice to your friend who maybe had a fight with, you know, their boyfriend or their husband or just a friend, and you think they should call him. It's a good idea for them to call him. Okay? "They shouldn't argue so much." Now, here you're kind of giving your opinion about another couple's relationship, and you're giving your advice to a friend about their situation, if that's not too confusing, I hope. So: "They shouldn't argue so much." They argue too much. My advice is they shouldn't argue so much. And third example for you guys: "He should apologize." If you, you know, want to be a good friend to your girlfriend or your boyfriend, and you want to give them, you know, support and tell them that their boyfriend needs to apologize, you're giving him advice even though he's not here. "He should apologize." It's a good idea for him to apologize to you because he made a mistake. Okay? Before we continue, I just want you guys to repeat these sentences after me so that, you know, we can practice the pronunciation and you're using the language that you're hearing in this video. So, repeat after me: "You should call him.", "They shouldn't argue so much.", "He should apologize." All right, let's move on to the second way we use "should". Now, here you can use it for past advice or to show past regrets. So, the structure for this, just like up here, you have "should" or "should not" if it's negative, plus "have". It's always "have", it's never "has". Okay? It's always the base form of "have". "Should not have" plus the past participle of your main verb. So, let's look at some examples so this is easy to see. First one: "I shouldn't have done that." So you are showing personal regret for something you did in the past, and you feel bad because you really should have made a different decision, so you say: "I shouldn't have done that." Now, notice here, you know, I put the contraction. We're speaking. I want to give you practical skills, practical language that you can use. I could say: "He should not have done that", and be very formal, but really when most people speak, they speak in contractions, so you and I will speak in contractions in this video, too; like a pregnant woman, contractions. It's a joke. Next: "You should've asked me first." Now, again, you're talking to a friend and maybe they made a decision and you feel they made the decision without asking you your opinion or if the decision was okay. So maybe your friend, I don't know, like, grabbed your phone and used it to call long distance somewhere, and your phone plan is, you know, almost up, your data is all used up, maybe they're, I don't know, watching a YouTube video. If they're watching engVid, let them watch, like, all they want, it's cool. But if they're watching something else, you know, you say: "Oh, you should've asked me first." This is, again, contraction: "should have". "You should've asked me first." So before we continue, let's repeat these sentences one more time. So repeat after me: "I shouldn't have done that.", "You should've asked me first." Okay, so that's for past advice or past regrets. And here, again, if you're using "I", usually it's for regret. "I should have done something", "I shouldn't have done something". Next: Expectation. So, if you expect something to happen or expect something to have happened in the past, you can use "should". Now, this can be used for present expectation, future expectation.
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Fixed Modal Expressions: Easy English sentences to memorize and use! Fixed Modal Expressions: Easy English sentences to memorize and use!
3 months ago En
In this lesson, you will learn 10+ fixed sentences that use modals. "Fixed" means that they do not change. You just use the whole sentence without changing it. That makes these kinds of sentences very useful for improving your English quickly. By the time you finish this lesson, you will sound more natural and confident when speaking English in many different situations. The fixed modal expressions covered in this video include: "You can say that again", "I couldn't help it", "I would if I could", "You would've loved it", "You shouldn't have", and more! Watch the video, do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/fixed-modal-expressions/ and improve your English! TRANSCRIPT Yeah. Oh, you can say that again. [Laughs] No, no. I'm sorry, I can't help it. Next week? No, I would if I could, but I can't. Okay. I have to do a thing here. Okay. Yeah. Bye. Okay. Oh, hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Fixed Modal Expressions". So, in this lesson I am going to improve your speaking skills and specifically your ability to use some very common conversational expressions that use modal verbs. In case you don't know, modal verbs are verbs like: "can" or "could", "would", "should", "will", "might", "may", etc. And a modal verb is always followed by a base verb, so for example: "can" plus a base verb, so: "can do", "can make", "can play", "can see", "will play", "will do", "will make", "will see". It doesn't matter what the subject is. All right? So, for example: "I can play", "You can play", "He can play", "She can play", etc. For, you know, a deeper understanding of modal verbs and their rules, we have tons of videos on engVid for you to check out. For this video, though, I'm just going to give you a whole bunch of different fixed expressions, expressions that are fixed, meaning that you cannot change the order of the words and that they are very commonly used in conversations. So I've divided them into, you know, expressions with "can", with "would", with "should", and with "will". Obviously there are tons more than this, but these will get you started. So: "can". "You can say that again!" When you use this expression it means that, you know, you want a person to repeat what they said because you strongly agree with them. So if your friend says: "This is impossible. It's impossible." Like: "Yeah, you can say that again." If you really think and agree the person that whatever they're talking about really is impossible, if I say: -"Oh, he really, really, really needs to get a new job." -"Yeah, you can say that again", because I know he's very stressed or something like that. Okay, next: "I can't help it." or "I couldn't help it." For this one you can use different subjects: "He can't help it.", "She can't help it.", "They can't help it." This means they have no control; they have an impulse, an instinct, a habit of doing something. So, if you are laughing at your friend and your friend thinks you shouldn't be laughing, it's a bad situation to laugh, but you can't stop laughing, say: "I'm sorry. I'm sorry. No, I can't help it. It's really funny." Okay? And your friend's like: "Hey. Why are you laughing at me?" Okay? So, if you can't help it, it means you can't control yourself. So if you're laughing, if you... I don't know. If you like to eat ice cream and you can't help it because you want to eat a whole tub, it's like: -"Slow down, slow down." -"I can't help it. It's so good. It's so good." Okay? Next: "I can't" or "I couldn't"-in the past-"believe it". Obviously... I think you guys know what this means. Right? And you probably use this in your life already as an English speaker: "I can't believe it", similar to: "I don't believe it." or "I couldn't believe it." It means that you don't believe what the person is saying or you don't believe what you are seeing in front of you. So if you can't believe it, you think that there is no way that this is true or this is real. "I could use a break." This can be used with other subjects, too. So, if you have a friend, for example, who is very busy all the time or who has a stressful life, maybe they're constantly working or they're constantly with their family, or you know, something else takes up a lot of their time, and you look at that... At that person, at your friend and say: "He could use a break." or "She could use a break." This means that they should go on vacation or they should... They deserve to have a break, they deserve to, you know, have some free time to relax and to recharge their batteries, basically. Not, like, real batteries; that's an idiomatic expression, but you know, get their energy back to rest and relax. Okay, so just for pronunciation, now that I've explained them, repeat these expressions after me: "You can say that again!", "I can't help it.", "I can't believe it.", "I could use a break." Good. […]
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Learn 20 passive "GET" Expressions in English! Learn 20 passive "GET" Expressions in English!
4 months ago En
'Get' is one of the hardest verbs to master in English. In this simple lesson, I'll teach you 20 common "get" expressions that you can start using NOW. The expressions taught in this lesson include: get blamed, get caught, get dressed, get engaged, get tired, get hit, get invited, get lost, get paid, get involved, and many more! If you want to improve your vocabulary and use common English expressions when you're speaking, this is the lesson for you. Come on. Let's get this done! Now, watch my video on 4 types of HOW questions in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_ro9075G2Q&list=PLrPhmmx5j5b-AjltXcrLI4iiqF7lsj_P8&index=5 TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/learn-20-passive-get-expressions-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Buttoned or open? Buttoned, opened. Open, okay. Hey, I was just getting dressed. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "20 Passive 'Get' Expressions". So, a lot of you guys have been asking me for more lessons on the verb "get" because it is everywhere in English, so today I'm going to look at 20 expressions that you can use in the passive sense with "get". So, basically to do a passive sentence with "get", you have: "get" plus a past participle verb. In these sentences, "get" usually replaces the verbs "to be" or "become". Okay? So if you're speaking in the past with "was" or "were", you would just replace "was" or "were" with "got". If you're replacing the verb "I am", okay? You can just say: "I get" in the passive sense. I think it will make a lot more sense once you see some examples, because if you feel confused right now, after the examples you will say: "That's better. Okay. It's not so bad." And it's really not so bad, so let's look at the examples. We'll practice pronunciation in this lesson, too. So, first: "Get asked". If someone asks you to do something, you get asked to do something. For example: "I got asked to work overtime." Someone asked me, probably my boss, definitely my boss asked me to work overtime, so I got asked to work overtime. Now, remember, here "get" is replacing a form of the verb "to be" or "become". So, you could say: "I was asked" in a standard past simple passive sentence. "I was asked to work overtime." But in speaking we often substitute "was" or "were", or other forms of the verb "to be" in passive sentences with "get". All right, let's look at some more examples. "Get blamed". So, if you are blamed for something, this means someone accuses you of wrongdoing, of doing something wrong. So, for example: "She always gets blamed for everything." So, if you know, maybe your sister, someone in your family, a co-worker of yours is always accused of doing the wrong thing or is always accused of being the person who does the bad thing: "She always gets blamed for everything." I always got blamed for everything when I was a kid. Not really. Usually it was my youngest sister, but just an example. All right? So, next: "Get caught". If you get caught doing something, this means someone saw you in the act of doing something, and it's something you didn't want other people to see. So, for example: "Don't do it. You're going to get caught." You'll often see this in, you know, crime dramas or movies where there's a bad guy, and the police catch the bad guy or, you know, a video camera catches the crime in action, so the criminal gets caught. So, if you are caught, you get caught, you are seen in the act of doing something that you don't want other people to see. Okay? So: "Don't get caught." "Get done". So, to be completed. Right? So, for example: "The project got done on time." We finished the project. The project got done by us-passive sense-on time. All right? "The project was done", "The project got done". Next: "Get dressed". You probably know this. I did a video on, you know, getting dressed and... What was it? "Get dressed" and "Get dressed up", yeah. Undressed and dressed up. So: "I was getting dressed when you called." I wiped that a little bit, sorry. But you see it. Right? Unless you're looking on your phone, in which case, just look at a notebook or something, or keep watching on your phone because the rest of this stuff is visible. So: "Get dressed". "I was getting dressed, I was putting my clothes on when you called me." Okay? Next: "Get elected". So, in a political election: "She got elected President. She was elected by the people to become President". -"Who got elected?" -"She got elected."/"He got elected." Just so we don't date this video I'm not going to mention the most, you know, recent political situations happening in the world because we will all be angry, and we're not going to do that. So: "Get engaged". So, before you get married, usually one of the people asks the other person to become their husband and/or become their wife, become their life partner, and they say... You can kind of see me. "Will you marry me?" […]
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English Prepositions: BELOW & UNDER English Prepositions: BELOW & UNDER
5 months ago En
Prepositions are hard to master in English. In this lesson, I talk about two very similar prepositions that often cause problems for English learners: "below" and "under". Should you say "He's below 21 years old" or "He's under 21 years old"? Are there situations where you can use both prepositions with no difference in meaning? The answer to the second question is YES, but there are situations where you must choose one or the other. To learn more about the similarities and differences between below and under, watch the video, then do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-prepositions-below-under/ to check your understanding. I hope your score won't be below average! TRANSCRIPT Hey. Am I under the board or am I below the board, or am I both? Okay, there we go. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this lesson on two very tricky prepositions, and those are: "below" and "under". So, we are going to look at the meanings of these prepositions and we're going to look at some examples, some contexts so that you can better understand and more confidently use them when you're talking about the physical position of something, or maybe not necessarily even the physical position of something, but if you're measuring something, for example. So, when I started the video, I asked: Am I below the board or am I under the board? Well, it's actually both. So, "below" and "under" can both simply mean lower than. So: "Hey, where is the..." whatever it is. -"Where's my mug? Where's my cup?" -"Oh, it's... It's below the cabinet." Or: "Oh, it's under the cabinet." Okay? So, basically if the cabinet is up here and your mug is here, or here, or here, or here - it's below the cabinet or it's under the cabinet, just lower than the cabinet. Same with: "It's under the sink." Okay? "It's under the sink" or "below the sink", it just means lower than. All right? And here I have Kiki from Kiki's Delivery Service, those of you who watch anime and know who Hayao Miyazaki is. So, she is flying on a broom and she's flying over a city. The city is under her. The city is below her. It's lower than her, because she's in the air. Right? Okay. And she might be, like, flying over clouds, so the clouds could be below her or under her as well. Next, let's look at "below". Some... Two specific instances where you must use "below", so for example, not directly under. So if something, like I said, is... If you have something here like a shelf, and you have an object here, like this marker, for example, the marker is not, you know, directly under the shelf, so we say it's below. So, for example: "We stopped 100 meters below the top of the mountain." If we're climbing the mountain and then we stop to take a break, maybe there's a cabin where you can go in, have some hot chocolate, prepare to climb the rest of the mountain, you can say: "Oh, we stopped 100 meters below the top of the mountain." You're not under the mountain. Right? You're on the mountain, and you're below the top of it. Next, for measurements. Now, you must use "below" when you're talking about measurements. So, for example: "It's 5 below 0." So if you're talking about degrees Celsius, or... Well, not in Fahrenheit. Degrees Celsius, basically, you can say: "It's 5 below 0." Not: "5 under 0.", "5 below 0." Another example: "We are at 150 feet below sea level." If you're talking about someone's scores in their class, you can say: "Her grades" or "His grades are below average." Or you can perform below expectations-right?-if you're measuring performance, for example. Next, for "under", basically if anything is covered, it, you know... You have to use "under". So, for example: "The cat is under the bed." Right? So he's under the bed, he's covered. Or with a blanket, for example, if a blanket is covering you, you are under the blanket. I am wearing a t-shirt under my jacket, under my blazer. Okay? Because the t-shirt is covered, so my t-shirt is under my jacket, under my blazer. And finally: "under" can be used as a synonym for "less than". So, for example: "He's under 18." Under 18 years old. He's less than 18 years old. "There were under 5 people at the office today." So, there were less than 5 people at the office today. All right, so let's do some quick practice. I have a grammar book. I have a novel that I'm reading right here. Where is the grammar book? Well, my grammar book is under my novel. Right? Because it's touching directly, so it's directly under. Okay? Now, where is my grammar book? My grammar book is under the novel. It's also below the novel, because it is lower than the novel. All right? So, just to give you another concrete example of how to use these two very tough prepositions. So I don't want to complicate it, so I'll just repeat it one more time. Lower than, "below" or "under". Not directly under, use "below", like if you're climbing a mountain, for example. […]
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English Grammar: "BEEN TO" or "GONE TO"? English Grammar: "BEEN TO" or "GONE TO"?
5 months ago En
What's the difference between "I've been to London" and "I've gone to London"? Is there a difference at all? Watch this video to find out when to use "been" and when to use "gone" in present perfect sentences. English grammar can seem confusing, but here at EngVid we make things easier by breaking it down and explaining the logic behind it all. Once you understand the rules, you'll know how to use the language. After you watch the lesson, make sure you understand it by taking the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/been-to-gone-to/ . See if you can score 10/10 this time! Good luck! TRANSCRIPT Oh, wow, I've definitely never been there before. Have you been there before? While we're on that topic: Hey, everyone, I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on two commonly used and sometimes confused words in English. And those two words are: "been" and "gone". Now, these two words, I say they are commonly used and sometimes confused because they are often used in a similar way, in a similar context, but there is one situation where only one of them works. Before we begin: What is "been", what is "gone"? Grammatically, these are past participles. And today we're specifically going to look at how to use them with perfect tenses, because the confusion with the two words usually happens in the perfect tenses themselves. So, first let's look at "been". Notice the arrows that I drew here. So, if you have been to a place, this means that you went there and you returned. So, for example: "He's been to India." And by the way, this "he's", this means: "he has been in this situation", this is the present perfect. "He's been to India." He went and he returned in his life. This is a life experience that he had. Okay? So you can say: "I've been to India.", "I've been to Disney Land.", "I've been to Niagara Falls." So, if you want to talk about life experience where you went to a place, you returned from the place, it's behind you, it's in the past, it's done, it's in your life experience, "been" is usually the word you want to go with. Next: "gone". Now, I'm going to look at "gone" in a specific context which basically means you went to a place and you're still there, and you went recently. So, for example: "He's gone to India". -"Where's Frank?" -"Frank's not in Canada, man. He's gone to India." This means recently Hank left Canada... Did I say Hank or Frank? Frank or Hank? How do you not remember? That's okay, let's keep going. "Hank/Frank, Hankfrank, Frankhank has gone to India." So, he went to India maybe two days ago. He's in India now. Let's look at some more of these examples with "been" and "gone". "Been". "I've never been to China." Okay? Life experience, I've never been and returned, I have never visited China. "They had been there before." So we're using the past perfect tense, here. They had visited that location before. Ah: "We will have been in Montreal for three years by then." Now, here, it's actually slightly different. Right? Because you're not saying that you went to Montreal and you returned to Montreal, but that you have lived in Montreal for three years, or: "We will have lived", "We will have been in Montreal for three years by then." So, here is a different sense. Here, you're saying that in three years: "Oh, we will have been in Montreal for three years by that time", by a specific time in the future. Okay? So, a different way to use "been". Now, again, remember "been" is the past participle of the verb "be", and after "be" you can use many, many, many, many different things, so you can talk about your age. Right? You can talk about adjectives, your feelings. You can follow the verb "to be" with a continuous form. Right? So: "He's been playing", "He's been reading", "He's been doing". For this lesson I specifically want to focus on using it to talk about travel and life experience with visiting places and returning from places. "Gone", okay. "Jack's not here. He's gone home." Now, here we're using the present perfect. One of the uses for the present perfect is to talk about something that happened recently. Okay? And you can still see the effects, or something that just happened. So: -"Where's Jack?" -"Oh, Jack's not here. He's gone home. He has gone home." Not: "He's been home", that means he went home and he returned, and it's a weird kind of sentence. Maybe, unless he went for lunch, I guess. And here's another one: "She's gone grocery shopping". -"Hey, where is Matilda?" -"Matilda's not here. She has gone grocery shopping." Okay? So she went recently, she's there now. Next one, ah: "They've gone on vacation." So your neighbours are not here, you notice their car is not in the driveway. "Hey, where are the Hendersons?" -"Oh, the Hendersons are not here. They've gone on vacation." Okay? And last one: "He's gone to work". -"Mom, where's dad?" -"Dad's not home. He's gone to work." Okay? Recently he left the house, he went to work, he's at work now. […]
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Improve your Vocabulary: English word pairs about TIME Improve your Vocabulary: English word pairs about TIME
6 months ago En
Improve your English with this useful vocabulary lesson! You'll learn 10 common word pairs to improve your vocabulary and to give you more tools to speak like a native English speaker. I'll also give you examples and explain when these expressions are usually used. The word pairs include: "now and then", "quick and easy", "then and there", "slow and steady", "little by little", and many more. Learn these short informal English phrases and you're guaranteed to sound more confident and comfortable in your English conversations. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-english-word-pairs-time/ TRANSCRIPT If you're lost, you can look and you will find me, time after time. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on some common word pairs or expressions with time. So, not just the word "time", but different expressions we use to indicate time, or different expressions or word pairs we use to talk about how long something takes, or when something happens. So, first we're going to look at five, and then we're going to look at another five, and each time we go over one of these word pairs I'll give you an example sentence, and I want you to, you know, see if you can guess the meaning of this expression from the context, and then I will tell you the actual definition of, you know, what this expression or this word pair means. So, let's not waste any more time and let's begin. Number one: "then and there". The sentence is: "I was hired then and there." Now, if you know the meaning, obviously, of "then", at that time; and "there", in that place - it means at that moment. Okay? So at that exact moment. At that moment. So, imagine you go to a job interview in this case and the interview goes very well, sometimes the person who does your job interview says: "Okay, we'll... We'll call you back and we'll let you know." But sometimes if they know that you're the right person for the job, they will tell you when... They will ask you, actually: "When can you start?" and they will hire you on the spot, they will hire you then and there, in that moment. Okay? So that's what "then and there" means, at that moment. Or: "She kissed me then and there.", "I was hired then and there." Next: "sooner or later". Sooner or later. "You'll have to do it sooner or later." So, most of us I think don't like washing dishes or we don't like doing the laundry, and we just look at it in the corner, you know, telling ourselves: "Okay, we will do it. Not now, later. Later." Okay? And maybe, you know, somebody will tell you: "Okay, can you...? Can you do it now? Because you will have to do it sooner or later." And in this case it means eventually. Okay? So, to say something a little more serious: "Sooner or later we're all going to die." You know, it's going to happen. It's going to happen. That's not the happiest memory or the happiest image, but you know, I think you get the meaning. Sooner or later. "Wait and see". Very simply: "Let's wait and see what happens." This just means let's be patient. Be patient. Okay? So, if you are watching a movie with a friend and your friend wants to know what happens next in the movie because you have seen the movie before, and your friend's like: "Oh, what happens next? What happens next?" And you just say: "Wait and see. Okay? Just wait and you will see what happens next." So, just be patient. Now, the final two on the first board are very similar: "now and then", "from time to time". Both of these, if you look at the sentences: "I talk to him now and then.", "She reads biographies from time to time." What do you think these expressions mean? Sometimes, that's right. So, infrequently or sometimes. Sometimes. Another word, maybe might be new for some of you guys: "infrequently", not frequently, and these are interchangeable. Okay? So: "now and then", "from time to time". "We go to restaurants from time to time.", "We go to restaurants now and then.", "I read mystery novels from time to time.", "I read mystery novels now and then." -"How often do you call your mom?" -"Now and then.", -"From time to time." Okay? So, we have: "then and there", "sooner or later", "wait and see", "now and then", "from time to time". And now let's look at five more. So, magic. Ooo. Hwah! Okay, so the next five. First: "quick and easy". "The test was quick and easy." So, something that doesn't take a lot of time, is not very difficult, basically let's just say very easy. Doesn't take time, doesn't take a lot of effort. So, often, if you like to cook and you see recipes on the internet or in a cookbook, you know, some of the cookbooks are called: "Quick and Easy Recipes". So, a quick and easy recipe for pancakes, for example. Okay? So something that doesn't take a lot of time and something that is simple, not complicated. The final four are all very much related to making progress […]
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Advanced English Homophones – different words that sound the same! Advanced English Homophones – different words that sound the same!
7 months ago En
Congratulations! You have discovered the advanced English homophones level! By now, you should be pretty comfortable with the material covered in the beginner and intermediate homophone videos, and you're probably looking for an extra challenge. Well, don't worry. I've got you covered. In this video, I look at numerous words in English that are pronounced the same but which are spelled differently. Here's a small sample: "bald" and "bawled," "air" and "heir," "horse" and "hoarse," and "retch" and "wretch." Is any of this English vocabulary new to you? Good! Check out the video to learn their meanings, and learn to tell the difference between them. If you haven't watched my beginner and intermediate homophone videos, make sure to watch them now: BEGINNER HOMOPHONES: https://youtu.be/a6zpryGgsYc INTERMEDIATE HOMOPHONES: https://youtu.be/w91iiv7Libc Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-homophones/ TRANSCRIPT You made it, I made it. We are at the advanced level of homophones. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and like I said, this is level three of my homophones series, the advanced stage. So, if you don't know why homophones are important to know, let me just repeat what I said at the end of the intermediate video, which is: They're important so that you know the spelling of words, you can understand context, you can understand what people are saying when they use a word that maybe has another word that sounds exactly the same but the pronunciation is also the same but the meaning is different. So, as a recap, homophones once more are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and have a different meaning. So, it's self-explanatory why they're important to know, but I mention it to you guys anyway. So let's not waste any time and let's level up, guys. "Air", "heir". I think you know what "air" is... Right? So, a technical definition, a mix of nitrogen, oxygen, and other small amounts of gases, or a soft breeze, or in the Phil Collins song: "I can feel it calling in the air tonight", something like that. It's a terrible, terrible voice. I'm sorry. I'm sorry, Phil. Very sorry, Phil. Or Mr. Collins, I'll call you Mr. Collins. "Heir", now "heir", "h-e-i-r", this is a noun and this is a person who has the legal right to someone's property after they pass away. Now, usually when we think about heirs, we think about it in, like, the Middle Ages where, you know, a prince is the heir to the throne of a king. Once the king dies, the heir steps up and he becomes the king. So, example from Lord of the Rings: "Aragorn is Isildur's heir", in The Lord of the Rings. Spoiler alert if you haven't seen that movie or read those books. So, Aragorn is Isildur's heir. Isildur defeated, you know, the evil wizard, Sauron, and you've seen the movie, you know. Okay: "alter", "altar". "A-l-t-e-r", this means to modify or change something, so this is a verb. For example: "Do you wish to alter your plans? Do you want to change anything or modify anything?" And "altar", the noun "a-l-t-a-r", this is a table that is used for religious rituals. So, any, you know... Many religions use altars. If you're thinking about Christian faiths, if you go to a Christian church, they will have a table in the front of the church, this is called an altar. So: "The priest is behind the altar." In the past, altars were used for other things, like animal sacrifices, and in some cases human sacrifices, like that Indiana Jones scene. Right? What's that word that they u-...? I don't remember. Anyway. "Bald" and "bawled". So, you probably know "bald", "b-a-l-d", an adjective which means without hair, having no hair. So, who's a famous bald person that I can think of? Well, if you've seen the movie Doctor Strange, Tilda Swinton's character is bald. She doesn't have any hair. Right? And "bawled", "b-a-w-l-e-d", so this is the past of the verb "bawl", "b-a-w-l" and in the past form it means cried loudly or wailed. So, let me... Let me look at some examples so you understand what I mean. So, first: "My dad bawled when he discovered his first bald spot." Okay? So, you know, balding is a process usually. When you find your first bald spot, like it's here usually, and you're like: "Oh no, I'm losing my hair." Although, bald is beautiful, too, so don't worry, guys. Just embrace it. It's okay. "My dad bawled"-like he cried strongly and loudly-"when he discovered his first bald spot". Or: "I bawled at the end of that movie." So, if you watch an emotional movie, or like the... You know, the big scene in The Lion King, for example, when Simba's father dies and when you were a kid, maybe you bawled because you were not emotionally prepared for that level of disappointment. Damn you, Disney. Damn you.
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Basic English: 4 types of HOW questions Basic English: 4 types of HOW questions
8 months ago En
How comfortable are you with forming English questions? In this lesson, I will teach you four types of questions that are specific to the word "how". I will show you basic English question structure with "how much", "how many", "how + adjective", and "how + adverb". This is an excellent lesson for beginners who are just learning the language, and it's a good review lesson for those students who just want to make sure they're doing things the right way. When you're finished watching the video, don't forget to test your knowledge with the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/4-types-of-how-questions-in-english/. Think of how much better you'll feel after watching this video! TRANSCRIPT How should I start this lesson? I have no idea. Okay, so I guess I'll just start. Right? If you don't know how, then just... Just do it. Just do it. Okay. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "How" questions. Specifically, we're going to look at four common types of "How" questions. Now, what I'm going to avoid is I'm not going to talk about every single possible structure with a "How" question because they follow the exact same structure as all other "Wh" questions when you're talking about "How" plus a modal verb. So, for example: "How can you know that?", "How would", "How will", "How could", "How might", and they also follow every rule that you know for question forms with the present, past, and future tenses. All 12 of the tenses. So, for that information you can check out, you know, other parts of engVid. I'm not going to cover stuff that you can do with every single "Wh" question out there. I'm just going to cover the types of questions that are specific to "How". Okay? So, number one, you can do "How" plus an adjective. The most common question... One of the first questions you probably learn when studying any language, is: "How old are you?" So: "How old", "How hot", "How serious", "How difficult". So, why don't you repeat some of these questions for me, guys? "How old are you?", "How hot is it?", "How serious is he?", "How difficult was it?" Okay, so you have "How" plus adjective. And, again, at home just get out a list of adjectives and say: "What kind of questions can I make with this? How cold, how serious, how funny, how", you know, just think of any adjective you can, see if you can make a question with it. Practice it. Next: "How" plus an adverb. So, for example: "How often", "How well", "How quickly", "How quietly". Okay? So, adverbs tell us usually how something is done, the manner in which it is done, or how frequently something is done. So, repeat these questions after me: "How often does he bathe?" That's a gross question, but it's okay. Next: "How well do you know him?", "How quickly can you finish this?" A very common question at work, if you work in an office. And finally: "How quietly can you speak?" It's a strange question. Sorry, guys, I couldn't think of anything in the moment that really makes like a lot of sense for that one. So: "How", now, these two you might be familiar with: "How many", "How much". If you don't know: "How many" can only be used with plural count nouns, so things you can count in the plural form. For example: "How many people", "How many websites", "How many books". Okay? Anything you can count-all right?-like chairs, tables, countries, whatever it is. So, repeat these questions after me: "How many people are there?", "How many websites do you visit every day?", "How many books do you read in a year?" Okay. And next: "How much", we use "How much" with things we can't count. Okay? So: "How much time", "How much tea", "How much English", "How much love", so these are noncount nouns. And if you're saying: "Alex, I can count time." No, my friend, you can count minutes, you can count seconds, you can count hours, but you can't count the concept of time itself. Okay? So... And if you're saying: "Tea, but I can count cups", yes you're counting the cups of tea, but liquid you can't. So, repeat after me: "How much time do we have?", "How much tea would you like?", "How much English have you learned today?", "How much love do you need?" Okay, good. So, like I mentioned, I'm not going to review every single "How" form for every single tense and every single modal verb because those question types exist for every question form. These are specifically question types that are specific to "How". Okay? And let me give you just two more that are slight exceptions. So, I'm going to give you one informal question that you can ask with "How", and the first one here is: "How goes?" this basically means: "How is it going?" or "How are you doing?" But if you, you know, are in a rush and you just want to ask someone: "Hey. How is it going?" you can quickly ask: "Hey. How goes?" Okay? "How's it going? What's...? What's happening?" And then last one is: "How dare you?"
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Sound like a native speaker: Modals Sound like a native speaker: Modals
8 months ago En
Would you like to improve your English speaking and pronunciation skills? Could you use a lesson on how to sound more natural and fluent in English conversations? This is the lesson for you. Learn how to understand and produce common pronunciation patterns with modal verbs. This lesson covers reduced pronunciation sounds for "could you," "should you," "would you," "would he," "should he," "should have," "might have," and many more! Build your speaking and listening confidence with this very practical English pronunciation lesson, then go out into the world and sound more natural than ever! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/reduced-pronunciation-modals/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. One sec. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this pronunciation lesson on "Reduced Pronunciation for Modals". So we're going to look at a whole bunch of modal verbs and situations where you can reduce the pronunciation. Now, this is going to help you improve your listening comprehension, and also to improve your speaking so that you can sound more comfortable and more natural when you're speaking as well. So, here we have: "would you", "would he", "could you", "could he", "should you", "should he", "have got to", "has got to", "have to", "has to", "ought to", and there's going to be five more after this board as well. Okay? Now, if you're wondering: "Okay, you have 'would you', 'would he', what about: 'would I', 'would she', 'would they', 'would it'?" There's no reduced pronunciation for those so I only gave you the ones where people normally do some kind of reduced pronunciation when they have these words together. Okay? So, one: "would you", in speaking very quickly can be pronounced and often is pronounced: "wouldja". Okay? So it's like a "ja", "ja". So, repeat after me: "wouldja". So, you could say: "Hey, would you mind holding the door?" Or just like this, repeat after me: "Wouldja mind holding the door?" Try it one more time. "Wouldja mind? Wouldja mind", okay. I will review them afterwards, too. So if you didn't get it the first time, don't worry. Next: "would he" can be pronounced: "wouldee". You're basically cutting off the "h" when you have "he" with the modal in this case. So, repeat after me: "wouldee". Like Woody from Toy Story, say it like that. Okay? So: "Would he know the answer?" Or very quickly repeat after me with the reduced pronunciation: "Wouldee know the answer?" Okay? Next: "Could you", same idea as "wouldja", we have: "couldja". Okay, so you could say: "Hey, could you help me with something?" Or very quickly: "Couldja help me with something?" Okay, try one more time with just: "couldja". Good. Next: "Could he", same idea "would he", "wouldee" or you can say: "couldee". So, you could say: "Could he do it?" or you can do it, repeat after me: "Couldee do it?" Perfect. Next we have: "Should you", same like "wouldja", "couldja", "shouldja". Okay? So "shouldja" is a little more difficult for me I think. And you can say it this way, in this case: "Should you be doing that?" Or with "shouldja": "Shouldja be doing that?" And if you're shaking your head right now, saying: "Alex, I can't, I can't", let's try it one more time, let's try just saying "shouldja". So just repeat after me: "Shouldja?" And now the whole question: "Shouldja be doing that?" Okay, keep practicing. Next: "Should he", again, you have: "wouldee", "couldee", "shouldee", okay? So: "Shouldee be here?" And, again, you could say: "Hey, should he be here? Should he be here?" Or when you have the reduced pronunciation, just: "Shouldee", "Shouldee be here?" Excellent. All right, next: "Have got to" and "Has got to", so you've got "'ve gotta" and "'s gotta". Okay? So, it's just fun to do, it's like an airplane. Speaking of, think of it like this. Right? "'v gotta, 's gotta". Okay? So let's try these two sentences with the plane. You could say: "You've got to try harder", okay? Or you can say: "You'v gotta try harder." Okay, repeat after me: "You'v gotta try harder." Okay, a little faster now that the airplane is making me... Making me say it longer, like "vvv", anyway. So, let's try it a little faster. "You'v gotta try harder." Good. Next: "Has got to", "'s gotta", so: "Mark's got to go home early", or contraction: "Mark's gotta go home early. Mark's gotta go." One more time: "Mark's gotta go home early." All right, next we have: "Have to" and "Has to", very simply: "hafta", "hasta". So you can say: "We have to get a new car." Or you can say: "We hafta get". Complete sentence this time: "We hafta get a new car." And: "Patricia has to ask her mom first before she can go to the party: "Or: "Patricia hasta ask her mom first." Let's just try the "Patricia has to" or "Patricia hasta". So: "Patricia hasta", "Patricia hasta ask", "Patricia hasta ask her mom". Okay, and finally on this board we have: "ought to", so we have: "hafta", "hasta". "Ought to" is just: "oughta". So repeat after me: "oughta".
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Intermediate English Homophones – different words that sound the same! Intermediate English Homophones – different words that sound the same!
9 months ago En
Homophones are words which have the same pronunciation but are spelled differently. In this video, you'll learn 10 intermediate-level homophonic word groups such as "aisle," "I'll," and "isle"; "allowed" and "aloud"; and "choose" and "chews". Besides improving your vocabulary and preventing a misunderstanding, often the double-meaning of these spoken English words can be the key to understanding jokes. So check this out and test your understanding of these words by doing the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/intermediate-english-homophones/ . Thanks for clicking, and make sure to watch my earlier video with homophones for beginners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6zpryGgsYc TRANSCRIPT: Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this intermediate lesson on homophones. So this is level two of my homophones series. And if you watched my beginner video and you feel comfortable with the idea of homophones, and you've mastered "your" and "you're"; and "there", "their", "they're"; and "its" and "it's" - fantastic. And now we're going to level up and go to the intermediate stage. So, as a reminder, homophones are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and they have a different meaning. So today we are going to look at ten more homophones or series of words that have different spellings, but have the same pronunciation and different meanings. Number one, this is a threefer, which means like three here. So we have: "I'll", "aisle", "isle". Now, I should put a star beside "I'll". Some people do not pronounce it as "I'll", some people pronounce it as "I'll", okay? Like: "I'll call you later." But a lot of people also pronounce it as "I'll", which is "I will", okay? And then this is "aisle". An aisle is a walkway. Now, it is specifically a walkway that is between a section or two sections of shelves or chairs. When you go to the movie theatre you walk up the aisle. Okay? It's a walkway, a space between, you know, when you have things on both sides. When you go to the grocery store, you walk in different aisles. -"Where's the salt?" -"It's in aisle three." -"Where's the cereal?" -"It's in aisle five", for example. And "isle", this is just the short form for "island". Okay? So, example: "I'll meet you in aisle three." If you're talking or texting with your significant other, your wife, your husband, your boyfriend: -"Where are you?" -"I'm buying milk. What are you doing?" -"I'm buying this." -"Okay. I'll meet you in aisle three." That's where the... I don't know, what's something that people like to eat? That's where the chocolate is. People like chocolate, right? Okay. And another example: "The Isle of Man is in the Irish Sea." So, the Isle of Man is a place which has an awesome flag, and it's located in the Irish Sea. It's the flag with, like, three legs and a circle. It's pretty cool. So, next: "allowed" and "aloud". So, "allowed", "a-l-l-o-w-e-d" just means you are permitted to do something, you are allowed. You have permission to do something. "Aloud", this one might be new for some of you. This means to say something vocally. Now, instead of just keeping it inside. Okay? Vocally or with a loud voice. So, for example, in this class, if you're sitting in university for example, your professor might say: "You're allowed to speak your thoughts aloud." Okay? Don't keep them inside. Vocalize them. Say them. Use them. Okay? And number three: "choose", "chews". The first one you're probably familiar with, it's just a verb which means to select, and "chews", this is the third-person version of "chew", which you do when you eat food or gum. Right? So this is chewing. So, a ridiculous example for all of you: "She chews gum when trying to choose her clothes." It's a weird habit, but she's like: "Okay, time to choose my clothes. I'm going to chew some gum and choose my clothes."
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5 types of jokes in English! 5 types of jokes in English!
10 months ago En
What's the difference between a banana and a million dollars? They both have appeal. Don't get it? You will after checking out this English jokes video. In this lesson, I look at five different TYPES of jokes, including "What's the difference between X and Y" jokes, "knock-knock" jokes, and three others. These are standard English joke formats that have been used for thousands of jokes. Especially for social situations, it's great to understand their format and pacing. If you want to share any jokes of your own, please share them in the comments section, and don't forget to check out my other two joke videos if you haven't already done so. Thanks for clicking, and (hopefully) for laughing! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/5-types-of-jokes-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT [Laughs] It's funny because cats don't wear diapers, yeah. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "5 Types of Jokes". So, specifically we're going to look at five types of English jokes that often play with word meanings. Now, if you're learning a language, learning jokes in that language is usually, like, one of the final barriers you have to punch through before you can claim to be, like, a full mastered speaker person thing in that language. So, today let's see if we can break through that barrier for you and with you so that you can learn five different styles of jokes in English. Now, I'm not saying these are the only types of jokes. Okay? There are tons and tons and tons and tons of joke types in every language, but I'm going to look at five of the more common ones today. So, let's not waste any more time, and... Ready for it? Going to start with number one. All right. What's the difference between X and Y? A very common joke type. So, for example: What's the difference between mashed potatoes and pea soup? You can mash potatoes, but you can't pee soup. Did you like it? I liked it. I think it's really good. If you don't know the meaning of this joke, because you know, you're a non-native speaker, "pea" is a type of little vegetable... Bean? Is it a bean? A lentil? Something. Anyway, something you can make soup with. And mashed potatoes, so you can mash potatoes but you can't pee... The other meaning of "pee" in this situation. Number two. Okay, joke type number two is: What does X have in common with Y? So, for example: What does a banana have in common with a million dollars? They both have appeal (a peel). Huh? It's pretty good? Not bad? Okay. Let me explain it for you so you can, like, want to hurt me some more. So, a banana, peel. And if something has appeal it means that it is attractive, like: "Hmm, I want a million dollars." You get it now? Let's just... Let's just move on to number three. Okay, next: "What do you call a/an...?" jokes. So, for example: What do you call a computer that sings? A Dell (Adele). Yeah, I like it. I like it. I think you like this one, too. Smiled just a bit, right? If you don't know, Dell is a computer brand and Adele is a famous singer in the 2010s to 2012 period and maybe beyond. Who knows? So let's just continue with number four. So, next we have the "Why?" joke. So: "Why did", "Why do", "Why does", "Why is", "Why was", "Why were". For example: Why was the math book sad? Because it had too many problems. Yeah, that's the reaction. That's what I'm looking for. That's what I want. Okay, if you don't get this joke, math books have questions you have to answer, they have problems you have to figure out. They're just very emotional, emotional books. Too many problems. Okay? Whew. You didn't like that one? Well, let's try for the last one, shall we? Number five. Next and finally: Knock, knock jokes. You didn't think I was going to do this video without talking about knock, knock jokes did you? So, the general structure of a knock, knock joke goes like this: "Knock, knock." And you say: "Who's there?" And in this case I'll say: "Lettuce." And you say: "Lettuce who?" And I say: "Hey. Let us in. It's cold out here." You're smiling, I can see it. I can feel it. Okay. So, if you don't know, you can probably hear why this is funny. "Lettuce" sounds like "Let us", so: "Let us in. It's cold out here." Did I just touch the mic? I'm not sure. Ah, it doesn't matter really, right, guys? All right, so let's review the jokes and we'll finish this for you. All right. That's it. All five jokes. But we're going to review them one more time to maximize the pain. Now, you can tell these to your friends, make them laugh, make them cry, or both. So let's go from the top. What's the difference between mashed potatoes and pea soup? You can mash potatoes, but you can't pee soup. Yeah. Number two: What does a banana have in common with a million dollars? They both have appeal (a peel). All right? Number three: What do you call a computer that sings? A Dell (Adele). Yes, yes. And number four: Why was the math book sad? Because it had too many problems.
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21 Common Present Perfect Questions in English 21 Common Present Perfect Questions in English
10 months ago En
Where have you been? We've missed you! In this extremely practical English lesson, I teach you the most common present perfect questions that English speakers actually use. These are FIXED questions that you can drop into your conversations with confidence, since every English speaker on the planet has heard them and uses them on a regular basis. The questions covered in this lesson include: What have you done? How long have you been here? Have you considered...? Have you thought about...? Have you ever wondered...? and many, many more! Watch this video to increase your vocabulary and to improve your English speaking skills. When you're done, don't forget to take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/21-common-present-perfect-questions-in-english/ to make sure you know the correct question forms. Then, go out into the world and use real English in your conversations! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. Do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do. Uh, hey. How long have you been there? Okay, well, let's start the lesson. Forget what you saw, but don't forget this. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Common Present Perfect Questions". So, in this lesson you're basically going to learn some fixed questions that all use the present perfect. You can use these, obviously, in everyday conversations, and hopefully after this lesson it will be easier for you to recognize these questions in other contexts, like in media or on the street, or anywhere where you hear English and speak English. So I hope after this lesson you'll feel a lot more comfortable, and you will feel like you have, you know, a lot more vocabulary, a lot more phrases and common questions that you can use to make you sound more natural as an English speaker. Okay. Ready, Totoro? Yeah, okay. So first... Well, before anything, why don't we talk about what the present perfect is for, right? So, as some of you or most of you hopefully know, the present perfect is usually used for life experience. So, for example: "I have been to China." This means that in my life experience any time before now-time is not important-I have been to China in my life. You can also use it to talk about something that started in the past, and has continued to the present. So, for example: "I have lived in Toronto since 2010." Example. And one more, you can also use the present perfect to talk about something that recently happened. Okay? And you can still see the effects of it. So, for example, if you say, I don't know: -"Where's John?" -"He has gone to the store." Okay? So very recently something happened. Okay, but this isn't totally a grammar lesson. It's more of a lesson on memorizing some fixed questions, so let's go over them. Starting with "Yes/No", and first those in your life questions, so: "Have you ever...?" Now, after "Have you ever", always use a past participle verb, so: "Have you ever been to a place?" So: "Have you ever been to China?" for example. "Have you ever seen something?", "Hey. Have you ever seen the movie Titanic?", "Have you ever seen the TV series, I don't know, let's say Stranger Things on Netflix?", "Have you ever eaten snails?", "Have you ever eaten snake?", "Have you ever received a parking ticket, a speeding ticket?" Okay? So you can ask: "Have you ever" questions to, you know, ask about a person's life experience any time before now. You don't care about the time as long as it happened before the present moment. Okay, some other common in your life questions: "Hey. Have you been there before?" So, this can be about any place. This can be a restaurant, this can be a city, this can be a dance club, this can be a karaoke bar. And you want an opinion from a person maybe to tell you about the quality of something, or to tell you about their experience with that place. So: "Have you ever been there before?", "Have you ever been to _______ before?" Next: "Hmm. Have we met before?" This is a common situation, unfortunately, for many people. If you can't remember people's faces or you can't remember people's names, and someone comes up to you, in this case let's say they come up to me and say: "Oh, hey, Alex." I'm like: -"Hey. Have we met before? I'm sorry. I don't remember your name or I don't remember your face." -"Yeah. Remember? It was at Jack's birthday party." And I say: "There were one hundred people at Jack's birthday party. I'm sorry, I don't remember." So: "Have we met before?" Okay? Next, you can use these questions to talk about something or someone that you have seen recently. So you can ask, for example: "Hey. Have you seen...?" For example: "Have you seen my phone?" if someone loses their phone, very common thing that happens. "Have you seen my phone? I left it in the bathroom. Have you seen it?"
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Phrasal Verb Opposites in English Phrasal Verb Opposites in English
11 months ago En
What's the opposite of PICK UP? How about STAY UP? In this very important English vocabulary lesson, I look at several phrasal verbs and their opposites. Do you think you know phrasal verbs? Find out by clicking on the play button! Most nouns have an opposite. Phrasal verbs also have opposites, and it's important to know them. Some of the phrasal verb pairs in this lesson include: pick up & drop off, get on & get off, get in & get out, turn up & turn down, and more. These are some of the most commonly used phrasal verbs in English, so make sure you know them by watching this video and then doing the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/phrasal-verb-opposites-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT So then I just got out of there as soon as I could. It was... It was a terrible scene. Okay, you ready for this? Let's do it. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on: "Phrasal Verb Opposites". So, today with the help of my friend, Steve the spider, I am going to look at... How many? One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10 - 10 phrasal verbs and their opposites for a total of 20 phrasal verbs. That is more phrasal verbs than Steve has legs. More phrasal verbs than Steve has legs. Right? So, we'll start from the top. First: "check in" or "check into". So you can check into a hotel when you first arrive. Say: "I'm here to check in." Okay? Now, when you check in, obviously, when you finish your stay at a hotel you have to "check out" or "check out of" the hotel. So, Steve, remember that time when we drove down to the States, we went to Fun Spot which is the biggest arcade in the world, we checked into the Holiday Inn on a Friday, and we checked out on a Sunday? It was a good time. I played Pac-Man Mania for like four hours straight. Next, we have: "get in". So, "to get in", specifically into an enclosed space like a room or a car, or "get into", the opposite is: "get out" or "get out of" a place or something. So, in a car, for example: "I got into the car. She got into the taxi." So you get into a taxi or into a car, and then to leave you have to get out. Now, you can also be inside your house, and you can tell someone, it's like: "Get in, get in, get in." Or if you're very angry at them, you can say: "Get out!" Like that one time, remember that? You know what I'm talking about. All right, next: "get on" or "get onto", "get off" or "get off of". Now, this is specifically for public transportation. So, you can get on or get onto a bus, a train, a plane, a boat. And then when you leave the bus, leave the train, leave the boat, leave the plane, you get off the plane, get off the boat, or get off of the bus, or the subway, or the metro. So, you get on the metro, the trip is finished, get off the metro. Okay? Depending on which part of the world you're from, you might say the metro or the subway. I say metro because I work around Montreal, but if you go to Toronto most people say subway, so it depends where you're from. Next: "go out" and "stay in". So this means... "To go out" means to go see a movie, go outside of your house on the weekend, and do something with your friends. So after this, Steve and I are going to go out and have a little party somewhere. Don't know where. We haven't decided yet, but we got some friends waiting for us outside and we'll decide after. Now, if you don't want to go out and you prefer a quiet night in your house, in your room like Steve listening to Pink Floyd in his bedroom while staring up at the ceiling, then you stay in. So your friends ask you: "Hey. Do you want go out tonight?" Say: "No, no. Pink Floyd. I'm going to stay in. I need to take in this music." Next: "pick up" and "put down". So, very literal. Pick up, put down. Pick up, put down. So you can pick up a glass, put down a glass. Pick up a pencil, put down a pencil. And this is another meaning of "pick up", so we have "pick up" and "drop off". In this situation "pick up" can mean to get something or someone from a specific location. So you can pick up someone from the daycare. If you are a parent and you have a young child, you can pick them up from the daycare, at the end of the day you get them. You can drop them off at the daycare in the morning, meaning you leave them there. For example, after work if you're calling your friend, your mom, your roommate, your wife, your husband and they say: -"Hey. What time are you going to be home?" -"Oh. I'm going to be a little late. First I need to drop something off at the bank"-maybe a bill you have to pay-"and I need to pick up something from the grocery store." So maybe you are out of milk, you have no more milk so you need to pick up some milk from the grocery store. And, again, "drop off" not just for people, not just for kids, it can be for things, too. Both of them can be for things. So you can drop off money at someone's house, or drop off a CD, or drop off movie tickets somewhere.
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English Homophones for Beginners – different words that sound the same! English Homophones for Beginners – different words that sound the same!
2 years ago En
Homophones are words that have the same pronunciation but are spelled differently. These words can really confuse English learners! Some of the most basic homophones include word pairs like "its" and "it's"; "there", "they're", and "their"; and "close" and "clothes". Learning to recognize homophones is essential if you want to make sure your writing is clearly understood, and it's also essential for building your English vocabulary. This is the first of a three-part series on homophones. If you are already familiar with these homophones, you can always jump to part 2, which is intermediate, or part 3, which is advanced. Homophones are a type of homonym, so you may have heard these types of words described before as homonyms. Thanks for clicking, and don't forget to check your understanding by doing the quiz at the end of the video at https://www.engvid.com/english-homophones-1-beginners/ PART 2: Intermediate Homophones https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w91iiv7Libc TRANSCRIPT Oh, hey. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this beginner lesson on homophones. If you don't know, homophones are a category of homonyms, and homophones are words that sound the same, but they have a different spelling when you write them and they have a different meaning as well. Okay? So in this video I am going to look at 10 groups of homophones; some of them have two words that, you know, have the same sound, some of them have three words that have the same sound, but a different spelling and a different meaning. The first three I'm going to show you, these are like the holy trinity of mistakes when people are writing English, and basically don't worry if you make these mistakes as a new English learner. I have friends on my Facebook who make these mistakes in writing all the time as well. So they're very important to know, identify, and to correct. Okay? So first: "it's" and "its". Same sound, different spelling. "It's", "i-t", apostrophe "s" is just a contracted form, the contraction for "it is". Okay? And "its" with no apostrophe is the third person possessive. It's a possessive adjective. So, for example, I was reading a book, this is The Innocent Mage by Karen Miller. I've been reading it for a few days, I'm enjoying it. So: "It's a good book and its cover..." Right? Possessive. "Its cover is really nice. It's a good book. It is a good book, and its cover is really nice." All right, I'm going to put this down for the rest of the video. Next: "they're", "their", "there". We have "they're", "t-h-e-y" apostrophe "r-e", just like "it's", if you see the apostrophe - contraction. "They are". "Their", "t-h-e-i-r" is the third person plural possessive adjective. And "there", "t-h-e-r-e" is usually used as an adverb of place. So, for example: "They're there with their dog." So: "They are there"-location-"with their"-possessive-"dog". Okay? So: "They are there with their dog. They're there with their dog." All right. And the third one... If only, if only people would not make this mistake. "You're" and "your". Again, apostrophe... As soon as you see the apostrophe, it's a contraction. So this means it's usually two separate words. "You're", "you are". Okay? And then "your" is the second person possessive, a possessive adjective as well. So: "You're not with your parents, are you?" If you're talking on the phone with your friend-possessive, "y-o-u-r", your friend-you can say: "Hey. Why are you talking, like, so funny? You're not with your parents, are you?" Okay? So, these three, I started with them because they are the most common mistakes, not only for new English learners, but also for long-time born and raised English speakers. So now we're going to go to some other ones, and you guys just follow me. Okay. Now that we have taken care of the most common mistakes, let's look at some other ones. First: "close" and "clothes". "Close", "c-l-o-s-e" is a verb which is the opposite of open. Okay? So you close a door. Next: "clothes" is a noun, it's a permanently plural noun, and "clothes" refers to what you wear, so a t-shirt, or pants, or a jacket. These are clothes. For example: "Close the door! I'm putting on my clothes!" All right? So: "Close the door! I am putting on my clothes!" Next: "ate" and "eight". "A-t-e" is the past of the verb "eat", "e-i-g-h-t" is the number, which I put there, eight. So he... "He ate eight hot dogs." Okay? There's a hot dog, I think, times eight, so: "He ate eight (8) hot dogs." Next: "here", "hear". "H-e-r-e" is an adverb of place. You are here on www.engvid.com or maybe on YouTube, depending where you're watching it. And "hear" is the verb, it's a sensory verb when you, you know, use your ears. In case you can't tell by my art that this is an ear, you hear with your ear. So: "I can't hear you from here." So when I am standing here and you're far away, I can't hear you from here. I will go closer to you or you need to come closer. Okay.
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English Grammar: Using 'THE' before 'NEXT' & 'LAST' English Grammar: Using 'THE' before 'NEXT' & 'LAST'
2 years ago En
English articles are tough. When was the last time you watched a lesson about them? In this video, I try to erase the confusion between "next", "the next", "last", and "the last". The rule on using the article "the" before "next" and "last" is much simpler than you think. If you're having a hard time with this topic, you should definitely watch this video, and next time you're wondering whether to add a "the" before one of these words, you'll be much more certain. Don't forget to check your understanding by doing the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-before-next-last/ TRANSCRIPT Yeah, it was really good to see you last night. No, I had a good time. Yeah, we haven't seen each other in ages, so we can get together again next week. Next week? Okay, I'll see you next week. Okay. Bye. Sorry, that was just an old friend of mine. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this lesson on "Next and Last Vs. The Next/The Last". So, this is a very common confusion, a very common grammatical problem that I sometimes hear from people who are learning English who are at the beginner, and intermediate, and sometimes at the advanced level even. But it's okay. You're here to learn, and if you've clicked on this video, like, you want to know this stuff and I'm going to do my best to transmit this information to you. So, first: "next/last". Now, when you are talking and using "next" or "last" with a day of the week, a week, a month, a season, a year, basically you are referring to the one which means you are referring to the day, the week, the month, the season, or the year directly after or directly before the current one. Okay? So, you heard my conversation on the phone: "Yeah, it was great to get together, you know, last night. It was great to see you last night." The night before today, last night. And I said I will see them next week, the week directly after the current week. Okay? So, for example: "See you next week!" The week directly after this week, the current one. "I saw him last night." I saw him basically directly before today. Or if it's night now, I saw him last night, the night before this one. Next: "Did you call her last Friday? She told me you promised her you were going to call her. Did you call her last Friday?" The Friday before now, the most recent Friday. Okay? "Next month will be busy." So if you are, you know, preparing for the holiday season or a specific time of the year where it's going to be very busy for you, and your family, and your friends, you can say: "Next month", the month directly after this one. So, for example, if it's January, next month is February. If it's March... March, April. Yeah, I know my months. March, the next month... Well, next month after March is April. Okay? So: "I will see you next month. Next month will be busy." "I can't wait for next summer!" Okay? So if summer just finished and the weather is getting colder if you are in a country that, you know, has more than two seasons or one season in some cases, please... You know, you can say: "I can't wait for next summer. I can't wait." And finally: "We're going to travel to Prague next year." The year after this one. So if the year now is 2017, next year is 2018. Okay? So we're travelling there next year. So, you use "next" and "last" with a day of the week, or just the word "week", or a month of the year, or a season, or a specific year when you want to refer to the one directly after or directly before the current one. You got it? Can I move on to the next part? Yeah? Okay, the next part. So: "the next" and "the last". So, when you are talking about the period of seven, 30, whatever number of days, or weeks, or months, or seasons, or years, or any other historical periods, whatever - starting at or preceding, which means coming before the moment of speaking, you use: "the next", "the last". Okay, that's a lot of information, so if we just look at some examples I think it's a lot easier to understand and to see what I mean. So, for example: "The next 2 weeks will be tough." If you are preparing for exams and you have exams for two weeks from now when you're speaking, the moment of speaking, you're thinking ahead, like: "Oh, man. Next week and the week after next week", so the next two weeks, this period of time will be tough starting from my moment of speaking. Next: "The last month has been amazing." So, basically the 30 days preceding today. So a month, 30 days, or 31 days, or 29, or 28 days depending on the month and leap years, and things like that. You can say: "Oh my god, the last 30 days, the last month has been amazing." The 30 days preceding now have been amazing.
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American English Pronunciation Practice: Short and Long "A" Sounds American English Pronunciation Practice: Short and Long "A" Sounds
2 years ago En
Do native speakers have a hard time understanding you? Even if you know grammar and vocabulary, your pronunciation can prevent native speakers from understanding what you're saying. This lesson will help you with the difference between the short and long "a" sounds in American English. You'll have a chance to listen to the difference between these two sounds and to practice your pronunciation with me, using common English words and sentences. If you don't understand the difference between these sounds, it can be confusing to the people you're speaking to. In some cases, it can change the entire meaning of your sentence! Watch and practice with this easy class to master these sounds. https://www.engvid.com/american-english-pronunciation-short-long-a/ TRANSCRIPT Water. Love it. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this pronunciation lesson on the short "a" and the long or wide "a" sounds in English. In this lesson, first I'm going to go sound by sound and give you a bunch of words that have the short "a" sound, as well as some sentences that use the short "a" sound. Second, I'm going to give you some words that have the long "a" sound or wide "a" sound, and some sentences that use them. And then finally, we're going to mix them all up and it's going to be a lot of fun. So, when you are doing pronunciation, it can be a little bit ridiculous when you're practicing because you are going to be asked in this video to exaggerate a little bit. And honestly, the exaggeration is necessary if you really, really want to perfect, you know, your English pronunciation, as well as have some fun with it. And also you should know that my English is a Canadian English/Americanish English for this pronunciation lesson. So if you are looking for British pronunciation, this maybe isn't the video. But if you're interested in Canadian/American pronunciation... Yes, I know that there's a difference, don't kill me, to some degree, but here's what we're going to do. So, first we have the short "a" sound. And for this I drew a picture of the mouth. In this sound your tongue is low, in the low position. For both sounds, actually, it's in the low position, and your mouth is only open a little bit. So your mouth makes this sound: "ah", "ah", "ah". Now, let's look at some words. And I just want you guys to repeat the words after me. We'll do it a little quickly. Okay? So, please repeat after me: "cut", "hut", "buddy", "cup", "nut", "shut", "putt", "gut", "cousin", "does", "was", "nothing", "sun". Okay, so you should hear that "ah", "ah", "ah" sound in all of these words. So, just to practice one more time let's go through the list one more time. This is going to help you, I promise. Just follow me for a few minutes here. "Cut", "hut", "buddy", "cup", "nut", "shut", "putt", "gut", "cousin", "does", "was", "nothing", "sun". Okay, good. Now let's look at some sentences with this sound. So here we have three-one, two, three-sentences that use the short "a" sound. So I'm going to say all three first, and after I'm going to go one by one by one, and I want you to try to say them and repeat them after me. So the first one is: "Buffy loves Sundays." The second one is: "My mother won some money." The third one is: "Some of the rugs are dusty." All right, now let's try them one by one. Listen and repeat them after me. We'll go word by word. "Buffy", "loves", "Sundays". One more time, complete sentence: "Buffy loves Sundays." All right, let's try the second one. "My mother", "won", "some", "money". Okay, complete sentence: "My mother won some money." All right? And the third one: "Some", "of", "the rugs", "are dusty". All right, complete sentence: "Some of the rugs are dusty." Did you say it? All right. Good. Now, let's look at the long or wide "a" sound. We're going to do the same routine, so first this sound your mouth is wide open. "Aah". Imagine you are going to the dentist. Okay? And it's a long sound. Your tongue is still low, in the low position, but your mouth is more open. So just try it one more time, like you're at the dentist: "aah". All right, let's do the words now. Repeat after me. "Caught", "hot", "body", "cop", "not/knot", "shot", "pot", "got", "coffee", "doctor", "a lot", "honest", "knowledge". All right, and just like before let's go through them one more time. From the top: "caught", "hot", "body", "cop", "not/knot", "shot", "pot", "got", "coffee", "doctor", "a lot", "honest", "knowledge". Okay, very good. Now, just like before, let's look at three sentences. And I will read all three first. One: "Rob stopped shopping." Two: "John got a job." Three: "It's obviously not!" Okay? So now let's do, like before, one by one. You guys repeat the words after me. "Rob", "stopped", "shopping". All right? Now faster: "Rob stopped shopping." Okay. Second sentence: "John", "got", "a job". O
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English at Work: 10 Phrasal Verbs for the Office English at Work: 10 Phrasal Verbs for the Office
2 years ago En
Do you work in an office? Do you have English-speaking clients? In this Business English lesson, I'll help you succeed in your career by teaching you 10 important phrasal verbs that are commonly used in the office. Do you "note things down" in your meetings? Do you "back up" your files? Is your printer always "running out" of ink? Are you "keeping up" with your colleagues? I'll explain what all of these expressions mean as well as "call off", "come up", "go through", and more! Check out this lesson and improve your English for work. https://www.engvid.com/10-phrasal-verbs-for-the-office/ TRANSCRIPT Yeah, hey. Something has come up and I can't make the meeting. Yeah, can we call it off until next Tuesday? Okay. No, no. Ask her to just, you know, just fill out the registration form and we'll just see her next Tuesday. Okay. Yeah. Okay, see you Tuesday. Yeah. Bye. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this important English lesson on using English at work. And today we are going to look at "10 Phrasal Verbs for the Office". So, if you have an office job, any type of office job, these phrasal verbs are very, very common in any English-speaking workplace. So let's start with the first five, we'll talk about them, we'll look at some examples, and I'll explain them for you guys. So, number one: "to fill out". Now, "to fill out" basically means to complete. And this is usually in the context of a form. So: "Did she fill out the registration form?", "Oh, if you're interested in working here, please fill out this application." Okay? So you fill out or complete a form. Next: "to run out (of) something". Now, I put the "of" in parenthesis because you can just say: "Oh, it ran out", or "something ran out of something else". So, for example, if something runs out it means you have used all of it and there is no more left. Now, in the office usually this refers to some kind of supply, some kind of inventory item that you have no more of because you ran out of it. For example: "The printer ran out of ink." Or you can say: "Oh no. We ran out of paper", or "We ran out of pens. We need to order more pens." Okay? So if you run out of something it means you have used all of it and there's no more left, you need to order more. Next: "note down". This is very common in meetings, and "to note down" simply means to write. For example: "Did you note down the main points from the meeting?" I used to have a boss, and any time I had a meeting with him, if I came into that meeting with no paper, with no pen, he would... He would not start the meeting. He said: "Okay, we're going to have a long meeting for 30 minutes, 60 minutes, you need to note down the important points from the conversation. Alex, go get a pen and a paper." Good times. Okay, next: "to back up". Now, this context is usually used for files on your computer. So: "to back up your files", "back up your information", "back up your data" means to make an extra copy. So, for example: "Make sure to back up your files." A lot of people use, you know, online storage spaces to back up important information. You might have something in your email address, you might have something like the... At this point, the cloud or, you know, like your Google Drive or something like that, or maybe you have an external hard drive where you back up your files or a USB stick to back up your files. So it just means make an extra copy in case the original copy gets deleted or erased by accident, or because of a virus or something like that. All right, next: "come up". So, if something comes up at the office it means that something has happened or it has arisen. So, for example: "An urgent situation has just come up." So if something comes up it's something that just happens, surprises you. So, for example, if one of your employees... If you are a boss, for example, and one of your employees quits... And you're in a meeting and the employee comes in and quits, and you say: "I can't finish this meeting. Something urgent has come up. Somebody is quitting." Okay? So something comes up, happens, arises without kind of you expecting it to. Okay, next: "keep up with". So, "to keep up with something" means to follow or to keep pace with something in the context of business, office work. Let me give you one example. "Have you been keeping up with the latest news? Have you been following the latest news?" You can also talk about a business keeping up with trends, with things that are happening in their line of business now. Okay? Next: "set up". So, "to set something up" means to organize it or to, you know, get it started. So, for example: "Could you help me set up the new printer? Could you help me plug it in and make sure everything is okay, make sure the software is on the computer? And could you help me set it up?" It's not only for objects. You can set up a meeting or organize a meeting. You can set up a holiday party, for example.
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How to improve your English by reading How to improve your English by reading
2 years ago En
How can reading improve your English? What reading strategies can you use to improve your vocabulary, pronunciation, fluency, and enunciation? In this instructional and motivational video, I tell you how picking up a book can not only help you to improve your vocabulary but your speaking confidence and presentation skills as well. Watch the lesson, and let me know some of your favourite books in the comments section! https://www.engvid.com/how-to-improve-your-english-by-reading/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "How to Improve Your English By Reading". So, it might be very obvious how reading can help you improve, you know, your speaking in English, particularly your vocabulary, but there are a number of reasons and a number of things that reading regularly and reading in specific ways can actually help you to improve your English, and also not only like your reading English, but your ability to speak properly or to speak confidently. And again, this applies not only to English as a second language learners, but also to English speakers, period. So pick up a book, and here's how picking up a book can help you to improve your English. So, number one: You can improve your English by picking up any book, reading out loud, and exaggerating what you're reading. You might think: "This sounds ridiculous", but if you are a second language learner, this is a fantastic way to improve your enunciation, your pronunciation, and presentation skills. Even if you're not a second language learner... English as a second language learner. So, for example, it doesn't matter what type of genre you like, what type of books you like. Me, personally, I love science-fiction, I love fantasy. And I can turn to, you know, pages in any of these books and read out loud, exaggerate what I'm saying, and just the act of doing this, of speaking out loud what I'm reading makes me feel, again, more confident speaking in front of an audience, for example. So I'll just open to a random page here and... Okay, so in this book, just so you know, there's a horse, his name is Artaq. And it says: "Artaq did not hesitate. He veered toward the Silver River. The wolves came after, soundless, fluid, black terror. Will was sure that this time they would not escape. Allanon was no longer there to help them. They were all alone." Now, what you notice is I'm... I'm trying to exaggerate: "They were all alone." Even like my l's. And focus on every letter when you're reading, because this type of reading, reading out loud, exaggerating, if you are a professional, this is a great way to build that clarity in your speech when you're speaking in front of people, and pacing yourself, how fast you speak as well is important, obviously, when you're giving a presentation. This second part... Again, this one can apply to both native speakers of English, but it's more specifically geared towards English as a second language speakers, and that is: Paying attention to word endings. And especially "ed" and "s" endings. So, specifically past tense words, like "wanted", okay? Or plural words, like "hawks" instead of one hawk, because a lot of, again, English as a second language learners sometimes forget the "ed" ending when they're reading. I've taught classes where, you know, students have to read out loud, and they're so focused on reading and getting the words correct, but the pronunciation, they just drop the ends of words sometimes, especially "ed", especially "s". So let me see if I can quickly find an example. Okay, here's one: "When he stayed on his feet..." When he... Oh, why am I pointing? You can't see that. You can't see that. So: "When he stayed on his feet" this is one part of the sentence. Again, you have the verb "stayed", so some new learners of English will sometimes read that as: "When he stay", "When he stay", and they just drop the end. So please, please, please focus on those "ed" and "s" endings, and this will really help your fluency, the ability of others to understand you, as well as your enunciation. "Stayed", okay? Number three: Pay attention to punctuation. Now, punctuation refers to the use of commas, periods, question marks, exclamation marks when you're reading. By paying attention to these things, you can actually focus on improving your intonation and your fluency; two specific things. So, the intonation refers to the up and down movement of your voice when you are saying something or reading something. So, for example, you know, raise... In the second part I said: "Raise intonation for yes or no questions." So if you notice when you're reading that, you know, this person is asking a yes or no question, then your voice should be moving up at the end. And, you know in speaking, this also improves that. So, for example, in this book there is... Okay, here's a yes or no question, the question is: "Did you find her?"
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Improve your English: WHO or WHOM? Improve your English: WHO or WHOM?
2 years ago En
When do we use "who", and when do we use "whom"? In this English grammar lesson, I will explain the difference between these two relative pronouns and when you should use them. It doesn't matter if you're a new English learner or a native English speaker – if you're not sure whether to use "who" or "whom", I hope that this lesson will erase your doubts. It's much easier than you think. Test your understanding with the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/who-or-whom/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Who" vs. "Whom". That's right, today we are going to look at one of the most commonly confused and asked about subjects in the English language, not just by new English learners but native speakers as well. So, we're going to use some grammar terminology, but I'm also going to give you some examples that will make it very clear what the difference between these two words is. So, first I'm going to talk about how to use them in statements, and after I'm going to show you how to use them with quantifiers, and at the end I'll look at some question examples with these two. So, let's start. First: "who" and "whom". These are relative pronouns. Now, what this means is "who" is a subject relative pronoun, "whom" is an object relative pronoun. What does this mean? Well, this means that when you use "who" in a sentence to give more information about something, you are using it to give more information about a subject. When you use "whom", you're using it to give more information about the object of a sentence. So let's look at some examples first with "who". Number one: "I have an uncle who works for Apple." Number two: "There's someone who is waiting for you." Number three: "Tom, who's been working here forever, recently found a new job." What do they all have in common? Well, they all have a subject, a person who you're giving more information about. So, I'm going to mark things up a little bit so you can see how this works. "I have an uncle who works for Apple." Who are you giving more information about in this sentence? You are giving more information about your uncle. So you have "who", and "who" relates to an uncle. Now, this uncle is doing an action. The uncle works for Apple. So, if you have a subject, you're giving more information about the subject, and the subject is doing an action after who, then you use "who". All right? "I have an uncle who works", he works for Apple. Next: "There is someone who is waiting for you." So we have "who". Who does "who" relate to? "Who" relates to "someone", a mystery person. So there's someone who is waiting for you. Yes, we are giving more information about someone, and the someone is doing an action. So here they are waiting. So I have someone... There is someone who is waiting. They are the ones who are doing the action. Next: "Tom, who's been working here forever, recently found a new job." So we have "who", I'm just going to mark "who's", "who has" been working. And yes, we are talking about Tom. And we are saying that Tom has been working here. So if the subject of the sentence is doing the action here, then you need to use "who". Next: "whom". Three sentences. One: "Ghandi is someone whom most people admire." Two: "That's the guy whom she married." Three: "My best friend, whom I've known for 10 years, is getting married." So, what's the difference between these sentences and the sentences with "who"? Hmm. "Ghandi is someone whom most people admire." Yes, the sentence is about Ghandi. We are talking about Ghandi in this sentence. But also important: Is Ghandi doing an action in this sentence or is he receiving an action in this sentence? Here we have: "Ghandi is someone whom most people admire." The sentence is actually talking about the people who admire Ghandi. The people are doing an action to Ghandi, and Ghandi is receiving the action in this sentence. So, here, and this is true in most cases, after "whom" you usually have someone who does the action to someone else. So: "Ghandi is someone whom most people admire." Next: "That's the guy whom she married." We see "whom". Who does "whom" relate to? Yes, we are talking about the guy, but the guy is receiving the action. He's actually an object here, because she married him. Now, I don't mean that the man is an object and the woman is the... An object in many cases, so I don't mean any of that. But grammatically, that's the guy whom she married. The guy is receiving the action of marriage from her. And finally: "My best friend, whom I have known for 10 years, is getting married." Here we have "whom". Who are we talking about? Okay, my best friend, yeah. But my best friend is receiving an action here. I have known my best friend. Okay? So here, I'm saying I have known my best friend. I have known him or her. Okay?
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The 10 Most Common "WHAT" Questions in English The 10 Most Common "WHAT" Questions in English
2 years ago En
What's one of the most difficult parts of learning a language? Asking questions! In this important lesson, I make it easier by looking at more than 10 common WHAT questions. This video includes these questions and more: "What's happening?", "What's up?", "What's that?", "What did you do?", and "What's the point?" So what are you waiting for? Watch the video to improve your English speaking confidence and fluency. Take a quiz on this lesson! https://www.engvid.com/the-10-most-common-what-questions-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Que? Mah? Ta? Qua? Cosa? What? Doesn't matter what language you say it in, the word: "what" means you want more information. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on: "Common 'What' Questions" in English. So, we are going to look at a bunch of questions that use the word "what". Now, again, "what" means you're usually looking for more information. It's one of the most common question words, which is why this lesson is important for you guys. Just like the other question lessons, we are going to focus on pronunciation, fluency, and... What was that thing? Pronunciation, fluency, structure. Definitely the structure. Very important to make sure the words are in the correct order. Whew, I'm out of breath, guys. Okay, let's go. Here we go. Number one: "What is your name/email/number/address?" So, you can ask a person for their name, for their email, for their address, for their phone number. You can also say: "What's her name?", "What's his name?", "What's their address?" for example. Okay? So, repeat after me and try to focus on quickness and fluency: "What's your name?", "What's her email?", "What's his number?", "What's their address?" You can even ask yourself, for example, if you forget something, like: "What's my password?" Okay? Like for your bank account, or your Facebook, or something you signed up for like many years ago or you've had the password automatically set, you can say: "What's my password. Wait. What's my login again?" Okay? So, next, very common: "What's this?", "What's that?" Okay? Many contexts. I'm thinking of a restaurant, for example, your friend gets something that you have never seen before and you're like: "Oh. What's that? That looks delicious." Okay? Or you get a meal and you didn't order it, you'll say: "What's this?" Okay? So please repeat after me, and again, focus on quickness: "What's this?", "What's that?" Very good. And next, similar to: "What is this?", "What is that?": "What is it?" Okay? Now, this question can be used in many different contexts. It could be similar to: "What's this?", "What's that?", "What is it?" It can also be a question you can ask someone if you think something is bothering, like, your partner or your friend or somebody in your life who you care about, and you can say: "What's wrong?" Like: "What is it?" Okay? So, this is a very common question if you want to ask a person you care about, you know, if something is wrong and what you can do to help. Like: "What is it? What's wrong?" Okay? Next, very common: "What are you doing?" Now: "What are you doing?" present continuous question can mean: "What are you doing now?" Like, you're talking on the phone: "Hey. What are you doing? Oh, you're busy? Okay. Can I call you later? Yeah, sure? Okay." You can also use this to talk about the future, like: "What are you doing later?", "What are you doing tonight?", "Hey. What are you doing tomorrow?", "What are you doing this weekend?" for example. Okay? So, it just asking... You know, it is just asking a person what they are doing in the moment or their plans for later as well. All right? So repeat after me: "What are you doing?" Very good. All right, the next three, I'm going to talk about these in the context of asking a person, you know, like what is new in their life or what is going on, what's happening, what's up. Those three questions precisely. So: "What's going on?" or: "What's happening?", "What's up?" The context I'm thinking of, you're seeing a friend you haven't seen for a while and you can say: "Hey. What's up?" or: "Hey. What's happening?", "Hey. What's going on?" These questions just ask and they mean, like: "What is new in your life?" Now, a very common mistake that people make with: "What's up?" specifically new English speakers is they think that: "What's up?" means: "How are you?" "What's up?" is not: "How are you?" So sometimes I hear... I say: "Hey. What's up?" and a student will say: "Good. You?" That's not how you answer: "What's up?" The most common answers for: "What's up?" are: "Not much." or "Nothing new." Okay? "Nothing much.", "Not much.", "Nothing new is happening."
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Learn 8 Phrasal Verbs with "PUSH" Learn 8 Phrasal Verbs with "PUSH"
2 years ago En
Ready to learn more English phrasal verbs? In this lesson, you'll learn 8 phrasal verbs with the the word "push". These English expressions are used in professional, social, academic, and athletic situations, so there's something for everyone! You probably already know that phrasal verbs are very common in spoken English. You'll hear definitions and examples for how these "push" phrasal verbs are used, so you can start using them yourself. After the lesson, you can push ahead and practice the English you learned by taking the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/8-phrasal-verbs-push/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on: "'Push' Phrasal Verbs". So phrasal verbs, like you know, if you have been following my channel for a while, are some of the most difficult words and expressions to master in the English language. They take a verb with a preposition, which is actually called a particle in a phrasal verb, but it looks like a preposition, and they create a new meaning when you match the verb with the particle, with the preposition, whichever one you want to call them. So we are going to look at eight, eight "push" phrasal verbs in this lesson. We'll start with four, we'll do another four right after this. So, I don't want to waste any more time. Let's get started. Number one: "to push ahead with something". So, to push ahead with something means to continue with something, to continue doing something when there are problems or when other people maybe working on a project wish to stop. So you keep doing it even though other people say: "No, no, stop. It's a bad idea." Typically, you push ahead with things in an office or the government will push ahead with something. Let's look at the two examples to show you what I mean. Number one: "We pushed ahead with the policy despite unpopular public opinion." The public didn't like the policy we introduced, maybe the policy says: "Everyone must have a fake mustache on the second day of every month." I don't know. And this is unpopular public opinion, but, you know, the government says: "Oh, it's a great idea. Let's do it." So they push ahead with the policy. Second: "The municipal government is pushing ahead with its plans." So, again: "to push ahead" is to keep going, to keep pushing with something even if there are problems or other people think it's a bad idea. Next: "push someone around". So think of... If someone pushes you around, they treat you in a rude way. They act like a bully. For example: "Our boss thinks he can just push people around." Or: "My brother pushed me around a lot as a kid." So imagine you are the person who is being pushed around, you're... Someone is bullying you, pushing you in this direction and that direction, treating you like they are a bully. Next: "to push someone away" means to force someone away from you. So: "The relationship wasn't working, so she pushed him away." This means, you know, she stopped calling him, she stopped commenting on his Facebook photos, she just did not text him anymore. She pushed him away because the relationship was not working. Next: "We're friends. Why are you pushing me away?" Okay? So: "You're my best friend. Don't push me away. Come back." Okay? Don't separate yourself. Don't try to force yourself away from me. Next: "to push a date or an appointment back", this means to postpone something, so delay something (s/t - something) until a later time or a later date. Two examples: "The meeting had to be pushed back by a week." So the meeting was pushed back, delayed by one week. "We pushed our wedding date back." So we realized... There was a family emergency maybe, so we had to push the wedding date back. Okay, now we're going to look at four more. Next we have: "to push back against someone or something". This means to fight back against someone or something. For example: "They pushed back against the enemy", against the enemy army. So the enemy army is coming at them, they're pushing them, pushing them, pushing them. And then they push back, push back, push back against the enemy army. Next example: "We can't accept these conditions. We need to push back." So, this could be a situation at your workplace where you do not like the conditions, so you want to push back against the management. Next: "to push for something" or "to push for someone" means to support and advocate for something or someone. Examples: "The employees pushed for more money." So maybe, again, the employees are not happy with how much money they are making, so they go on strike and in their discussion with the management, they push for more money. They support and advocate for more money. Next: "Most Canadians pushed for Justin Trudeau in the 2015 election." So they pushed for him, supported him, advocated for him, and he won. He became the Prime Minister in 2015.
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English Vocabulary: House Cleaning English Vocabulary: House Cleaning
2 years ago En
Your house is a mess! I'm going to help you to clean it... in English! In this lesson, you'll learn some common house cleaning verbs and nouns, like "sweep", "mop", "clean", "wipe", "vacuum", "scrub", "broom", and "cloth". This is an easy lesson that will help you talk about your daily chores in English. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-house-cleaning/ TRANSCRIPT [Whistling] Oh, hey, guys. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "House Cleaning Vocabulary". So, most of us, we have to deal with house cleaning. Cleaning our homes is one of the most basic things that we do on our weekends or during the week. So, let's look at some common verbs, as well as some common nouns that you can use to talk about house cleaning. Number one, obviously the most basic verb, is: "clean". So, you can use the verb "clean" to talk about anything. You can clean the floor, clean the window, clean a wall, clean a table, clean a chair. That's all you need to know about the verb "clean". Next, we have the verb: "sweep". So: "Sweep the floor with a broom." Does anyone know what a broom is? That's right. This is a broom. Okay? And sweeping is the action of doing this. So, you sweep the floor with a broom. Okay? Now, once you sweep the floor, you might want to, you know, clean it a little more maybe with some water and some soap. And if you want to clean the floor with some water and some soap, what you are doing is you're probably mopping the floor with a mop. Now, I don't have a mop with me today, but it's best to think of a mop as like a broom with a wet part at the end. So, mopping, you're going whoosh, whoosh, whoosh, whoosh. You're mopping the floor with a mop. The verb and the noun are the exact same thing. Next up, we have "vacuum". Now, what is a vacuum? Let me show you. There we have a vacuum. And it's similar to "mop" where the verb and the noun are the exact same thing. So, you can vacuum with a vacuum, just like you can mop with a mop. All right? Next, we have the verb: "wipe". And "wipe" can be used in many contexts as well. So, if I have let's say... Let's imagine this is a piece of cloth. I can wipe off the table with a cloth, for example. Or you... I can wipe off the board if it's dirty. So, "to wipe" is this action. Okay? And, again, you can use the preposition "off" as a phrasal verb, so you can wipe off a table or wipe off a board, for example. Next, we have the verb: "scrub". Now, "scrub" is very often used when you're cleaning, you know, your bathroom, or the bathtub, or the walls in your bathroom. And if you have tiles, which are, again, the square pieces like in a bathroom, you can scrub them. Okay? And normally, what you need is a brush to scrub, not a toothbrush, but, you know, a cleaning brush or what you can call a scrubbing pad. So, to really get that hard clean, to scrub stuff around your toilet, or around your bathtub, or around the walls in your bathroom. Okay? And finally, you can use the word: "Dust (or dust off) the table with a duster." Now, "dust" is something which accumulates over time on tables, on pretty much anything. Imagine it as being the little particles that build up over time if you don't touch something. So, if you can [do this to a book or to a table, you will see dust flying off of it, and you need a duster to dust off the dust. Okay? So, to review, the most common verb you can use in house cleaning is "clean". You can sweep the floor with a broom. You can mop the floor with a mop. You can vacuum the floor or the carpet with a vacuum. You can wipe a table with a cloth. And you can scrub tiles with a brush or a scrub pad. And you can also dust a table with a duster. If you'd like to test your understanding of this vocabulary, as always, you can check out the quiz on www.engvid.com. And don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel. Back to work.
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How to negotiate in English: Vocabulary, expressions, and questions to save you $$$ How to negotiate in English: Vocabulary, expressions, and questions to save you $$$
2 years ago En
Want to save money? Getting the best price can be hard, and it's even harder if you aren't comfortable using the language you have to negotiate in. In this useful English lesson, you'll learn how to get a better deal by negotiating prices. You'll learn phrases and vocabulary you can use to get a better price on your car, house, or on any item at a local market. Learn about the different ways you can ask about prices politely, so you can get more for less! I'll also teach you some helpful vocabulary we use to talk about prices, like "pricey", "ballpark", "halfway", and many more. You'll also learn a little bit about cultural aspects of negotiating prices in North America. http://www.engvid.com/how-to-negotiate-vocabulary-expressions-and-questions-to-save-you-money/ TRANSCRIPT I've always wanted to do that. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on: "How to Negotiate Prices". So, this is a business vocabulary lesson, and today we are going to look at how to ask about the cost of something, how to comment about the cost being too high for you, and then how to get someone to maybe lower the price of something. Now, what situations can we do this in, you know, in the 21st century? This is if you're trying to negotiate the cost of a car maybe, the cost of a house, or it can be something in a local market or a garage sale. So, first let's look at how to ask about the cost of something. And I have-one, two, three, four, five-six different questions that you can use to ask about cost, to ask about the price. Number one: "How much does this/that/it cost?" For the sake of me not saying the words: "this", "that", "it" every time, I'm just going to say "this", but know that you can say: "How much does this cost?", "How much does that cost?", "How much does it cost?" Okay? So, next: "How much is this/that/it?" Instead of: "How much does this cost?", "How much is this?" Next: "How much is this/that/it going for?" So, this is an expression. Something goes for a certain amount of money. For example, say: "Oh, this comic book is going for $20." Maybe it's a rare collector's edition or something. "It is going for...", "It costs..." This is how much people are paying for it. Okay. "Hey. How much is it for this/that/it?" So you're asking: "How much money, you know, is it...? Does it cost for this? How much is it for this?" And if you want to be a little bit more specific, this one you can use in a more informal situation, like a garage sale, for example, or at the market, like: "Hey. How much do you want for this?" Okay? Or: "How much do you want for that or it? How much do you want for it?" And another one: "Is this/that the final price?" So, you're kind of opening the door to say: "Mm, is this the final price? I'm not sure I want to pay this price. Is it the final price or can I talk about it with you?" Sometimes the person you are talking to, you know, if you ask them this question: "Is this the final price?" and they'll say: "Well, you know, what are you thinking? Like what do you have in mind? What is another price we can talk about?" Now, if you want to negotiate and you want to get the price down, you need to comment and say: "It's a little..." For example, this thing, whatever, you're looking at the price and this thing... Imagine this is $500. $500 for this amazing globe. Now, you can say: "$500. It's a little expensive.", "It's a little pricey." "Pricey" is an adjective. You see the word "price", it's slang for expensive. "It's a little pricey.", "It's a little out of my price range." So, for example, you have a range. A range means kind of like from $0 to $200 is my range. That's where I can go with the price, but $500, that is ridiculous. Same with: "It's a little over my budget." So, your budget is how much money you can spend or how much money you want to spend. So, my budget to buy this globe was $300. $500 is over my budget. You can say: "It's more than I have. I don't have $500. It's more than I have." Or you can also say: "It's more than I can pay." or: "It's more than I can afford." So now you've opened the door, you've started the discussion, saying: "I'm interested in this globe, but it doesn't really, you know, match what I can pay you." So let's see where the conversation can go from here. Okay, now you've asked about the price, you've commented that it's a bit too expensive. It's time to make an offer. It's time to say what you can pay for it. So, there are a couple of phrases that you can use. You can say, for example: "Would you sell it for $200?" That's really low. You can also say: "Would you take $200?", "How about $200?" If you want to be very direct: "I'll give you $200." Okay? So, very direct, saying: "I will give you $200."
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15 Common WHO Questions in English 15 Common WHO Questions in English
2 years ago En
Do you have trouble with asking questions in English? In this essential lesson, I look at some of the most common questions using "who". The word "who" is most often used as a pronoun in English, and it represents a person or persons in a sentence. Here are some examples: "Who is it?", "Who's with me?", "Who's that?", "Who did that?", "Who won?" There are too many "who" questions to list here, so watch the video to learn many more. This useful lesson will help you gain confidence and fluency in English. http://www.engvid.com/15-common-who-questions-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on: "Common WHO Questions in English". That's right, today I am Dr. Who for you. Woo, woo, woo, woo. That was not too bad. Right? Okay. So, today, if you've watched the other videos on common questions, this is the one for "Who?" So, just like those videos, we're going to practice the pronunciation, the fluency, and the structure of these questions. So I don't want to waste any time. Let's begin. First one, a very philosophical question: "Who am I?" Okay? So, this is also the title of a Jackie Chan movie, and it's also the title of another movie I think from the 2000s that's also action-based. So: Who am I? You know, if you're ever 16 years old, if you're 17, you're looking up at your ceiling while listening to whatever music kids listen to today, just: "Who am I?" You know? That's it. Just think about it. And: "Who are you?" So, you know, if you meet someone for the first time or if you think someone is acting rudely, you can be like: "Who are you?" Okay? Or, like: "Who are you? I don't know you." Like: "Who are you?" Are you, like, her brother or her sister, or who are you? I don't know. All right? And: "Hey. Who's he?", "Who's she?", "Who's this?", "Who's that?" Okay? So if you don't know someone and you're talking to a family member, a colleague, a friend, co-worker, and you want to know because you want to meet someone or you're curious about someone, and you can say: "Hey. Who is that?", "Who is she?", "Who is he?", "Who's this?" Okay? All right, so these three because they're common, you know, they say: "Who am I?", "Who are you?", "Who is she?", "Who is he?", "Who is this?", "Who's that?" I said them very quickly, and now I want you to repeat them after me. So repeat after me: "Who am I?", "Who are you?", "Who's he?", "Who's she?", "Who's this?", "Who's that?" All right, very good. Now, next, similar style of question: "Who is the _________?" Here, you have many possibilities, many different titles that you can use in this question. So: "Who's the president?" If you... If you're travelling to a new country and you don't know about the political system or the political leaders, or you're just curious about the political leader in a country or a place, you can say: "Who's the prime minister there?", "Who's the president?", "Who's the new guy?" or "the new girl", right? So, if you're working in a company and someone new comes in, and maybe you never met them before, very common question: "Hey. Who's the new guy?", "Who's the new girl?" Like, where...? Where did they come from? Okay? "Who's the teacher?" So you're taking a class in university and you're looking at the name of the class, and you're like: "Oh, this sounds interesting. Who's the teacher? Who teaches that class?" Okay? "Who's the leader?", "Who's the goalie?" Right? So if you're trying to gamble and make a bet on a team, and you want to know, you know, in hockey or in soccer/football, depending on where you're from, you want to know: "Hey. Who's the goalie for that team? Who's in net? Who's blocking the shots?" Because if it's someone who's bad, then maybe I will bet on the other team. Or: "Who's the boss?" This is only a reference. I only put this here to reference a 1990's TV show with Tony Danza, and I don't remember the actress' name in the show. She was Angela. Who's the Boss? Anyone? If you're like under 25, you probably don't know. I'm sorry. Okay, and next, I drew a door. Very common question if someone knocks on your door: "Who's there?", "Who is it?" Okay? So, again, you can also say, you know: "Who's there?" or "Who is it?" if you hear someone in a room and you thought you were alone, you can say, like: "Who's there?" Also very common in horror movies or thrillers, like: "Who is it? Who's there?" Okay? Next: "Who's coming?" or "Who's going?" So, you know, your friend is having a birthday party and you want to know about how many people will be there or who will be there, so you can ask: "Who's coming?" or "Who's going? Who's going to the party?" Okay? All right. Now, let's go back a little bit and repeat these with me. So we'll do three and three. "Who's there?", "Who is it?", "Who's coming?", "Who's going?" Okay?
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17 ways to say "YOU'RE WELCOME" in English 17 ways to say "YOU'RE WELCOME" in English
2 years ago En
When someone says "thank you", we usually respond with "you're welcome". But can you believe there are at least 17 different ways to say "you're welcome" in English? In this lesson, I will teach you 17 ways that you can acknowledge someone's gratitude. You will learn when and how to use "no problem", "no worries", "don't mention it", "my pleasure", "it was nothing", and 12 more! If you want to add more variety and learn other polite formulas to respond to thanks, this is the English lesson for you. Don't forget to do the quiz I wrote for this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/17-ways-to-say-youre-welcome-in-english/ .
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Learn English by playing Final Fantasy 7! Let's play and learn! Learn English by playing Final Fantasy 7! Let's play and learn!
2 years ago En
Looking for a FUN way to learn English? Have you tried video games? That's right! In this lesson, I'll teach you English from the popular game Final Fantasy VII. This game has a great story and lets you "speak" with many characters about a variety of issues. Because of how interactive it is, you can really learn a lot of English from the game, especially vocabulary, expressions, and slang. I'll go over the first half hour of the game with you, and explain the English that the characters use. I think this is a great way to learn English: it's fun, it's engaging, and it forces you to learn key phrases and vocabulary. In a way, it's like traveling to an English speaking country! If you enjoy this video and want to see more like it, stick around until the end to see my views challenge! If you liked this video, you should also watch my video about learning English with STAR WARS! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpksX5p0J9k TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON TO TEST YOUR UNDERSTANDING: http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-final-fantasy-vii/
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Collective Nouns in English: How to talk about groups of people and things Collective Nouns in English: How to talk about groups of people and things
2 years ago En
Do you want to speak more fluent English? Learn to use collective nouns – special words we use to talk about groups of people, animals, or objects. This is an important English vocabulary lesson because a lot of these words will not make sense logically to you unless you know the meaning in this context already! Some of the collective nouns I'll teach you include: a batch of cookies, a deck of cards, a litter of kittens, an army of caterpillars, and more! Watch this video before the rhinos get me! Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/collective-nouns-in-english-how-to-talk-about-groups-of-people-and-things/ TRANSCRIPT Is it safe? Can I come out? Okay. Whew. Okay, I was just baking some cookies, but the strangest thing happened. A group of rhinos started chasing me, so now I'm just... I'm trying to escape, but I want to give you guys this very, very important English lesson first. So I'm going to put these down, and we're going to try to do this lesson before the rhinos come back. Okay? Okay, let me... Let me compose myself. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Collective Nouns". So, collective nouns are nouns we use to talk about a group of things, animals, or people. Of course, it's possible just to say: "A group of", whatever. For example: "a group of birds" or "a group of kittens", but there are very specific names that we can give them and we do give them to make it a little more specific, I guess. Okay? So, I'm going to give you first some of the most common ones that we use, and then some that are a little less common. So, to begin: I had "a batch of cookies" at the start of this lesson. So, if you are baking and you bake a lot of cookies like I did, you baked a batch of cookies. Okay? So you can say: "The first batch is ready." or "The second batch is in the oven." or "I made three batches of cookies." All right, next: "a bouquet of flowers". I think many people probably know this one. So we just say: "Bouquet". Very French. Right? Very French. So, you can give a bouquet of flowers to your mother on Mother's Day, or to your girlfriend, boyfriend, husband, wife on the anniversary or Valentine's Day. Next: If you play poker, you need "a deck of cards". Right? It's not a group of cards. It is a group of cards, but we don't say: "Hey. Do you have a group of cards?" We say: "Do you have a deck of cards?" Okay? Next: Birds, if you have many birds, a group of birds together, they are called: "a flock", "a flock of birds". Okay? In the 1980s there was a band called "Flock of Seagulls". A seagull is that white, annoying bird in public, and they had a famous song, "I Ran", went like: "And I ran, I ran so far away..." Doo, doo, doo, doo. Whatever the lyrics were. I don't remember them. So, "a flock of birds", "a flock of seagulls." Next: For cows and buffalo, you can say: "a herd", "a herd of cattle", "a herd of buffalo". If you have kittens, baby cats, baby dogs, you say: "a litter of kittens", "a litter of puppies". So, for example, in the movie 101 Dalmatians, a famous Disney movie where there are 101 baby puppies, baby Dalmatians, that is a litter of 101 puppies. Next: "a pack of wolves", or dogs, or hounds. So, the movie, Frozen, very popular amongst young people, girls-my daughter loves it-there's a scene where Anna and Kristoff are escaping in the forest and behind them there are a bunch of wolves, a group of wolves, so you can say: "A pack of wolves is chasing them." All right? Next: "a panel of judges" or "a panel of experts". If you watch TV shows, like The Voice, or American Idol, and you have one, two, three judges... Usually you have the nice one, and the annoying one, and the one who's really hard on people. This is a panel of judges. Okay? Or a panel of experts. "A school of fish", so I'm going to tie this to movies again. If you have seen Finding Nemo, any time you see that big group of fish travelling together, that is called "a school of fish". Yes, just like go to school, the same thing. A school of fish. And finally: "a wealth of information". Now, information is non-count. You cannot say: "One information, two informations, three informations". You can say: "A lot of information" or "A wealth of information". All right. Let's look at some more on this side. A little less common, here. We have: "an army of caterpillars". It sounds really cool. Right? So, caterpillars become butterflies, but if you have a lot of caterpillars together, that's called "an army of caterpillars". I don't recommend you Google search "army of caterpillars", especially if you don't like insects because some of the pictures of the caterpillars all together, and being furry, and fuzzy, and... Uhgl. It's not very nice if you don't like insects. Also, "army" like: "an army of soldiers". Or in this case, on my shirt, an army of stormtroopers from Star Wars.
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English Books: How to learn English with Harry Potter! English Books: How to learn English with Harry Potter!
2 years ago En
Want to improve your English by reading? In this reading lesson, we'll go to Hogwarts to look at the story and vocabulary from chapter 1 of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Learn English with me, as I read and explain actual passages from the book. If you want to improve your vocabulary, and your overall English comprehension, reading books is a great way to do it! Even if you don't care about Harry Potter, you should still watch this video to learn some good vocabulary and expressions. Take the quiz on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/english-books-harry-potter/ You can buy the book or ebook of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone here: http://www.engvid.com/out/amz_harry . For a more interactive experience, you can sign up for a trial account with Audible and download the FREE audiobook version of Harry Potter: http://www.engvid.com/out/audiblealex I recommend the audiobook, because you will be able to hear how all the words are pronounced. Learn English with Harry Potter, and see how studying a new language can be magical! TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this important lesson on: "The Secret to Mastering English!" And the secret is... -"Where am I? And who are you?" -"You're in Hogwarts, Alex. And I'm Dumbledore." -"No you're not. Dumbledore looks different." -"I shaved. Listen, Alex. I have an important job for you. Can you do it?" -"Anything for you, Dumbledore. What is it?" -"Your engVid students want you to do a lesson on Harry Potter. Here, take this and teach them." -"Thank you." -"You're a wizard, Alex. Now, go." We're back. So, today we are going to talk about Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, chapter one. Now, I know for many of you, Harry Potter was the first book you read in English. And the reason it's a really, really good book for you guys to read is that it is the most popular book series ever, which means that you can find it in many languages, there have been movies made about it, and you can find a lot of discussion about the characters, the dialogue, the story. So everyone knows pretty much what happens in a lot of these stories. Now, if you don't have a copy of the book, what you can do is get a print version or an e-book version on Amazon attached to this video. What I recommend, though, if you want a more interactive experience with Harry Potter is that you get the free audio book. Now, you can get a free audio book of Harry Potter, not just this one, the entire series, by signing up for the free trial at www.audible.com, which is attached to this video. When you click on the link, you will have to go through a couple of different pages and signups, but at the end you do get the book for free. So go through it, sign up, get the book for free, and it's an excellent audio book. Highly recommend it. Now, why should we read Harry Potter? Well, it has interesting characters; Harry, Ron, Hermione, the Dursleys, Dumbledore who I met today. How cool was that? It has great dialogue, great plot, and the language is pretty easy to follow, but of course, it still has a ton of useful vocabulary. Not just for non-native English speakers, but even for, you know, kids who are already native speakers of English. And finally, it's just magical. It's a magical story, a magical book. I love it. It's one of my all-time favourites, so let's start looking at chapter one. So what I'm going to do is look at the actual text from chapter one. Not every line, of course, but I'm going to pick some very specific lines that tell us important details about the story or that tell us some important vocabulary that I think is going to be useful for English students. Now, you notice I gave a page number to start this. I am going to be looking at this hard cover version of the book. This was published by Raincoast Books in Vancouver, so this was published in Canada. Maybe your version is this one, maybe it's not. Maybe you're listening to the audio version, in which case page numbers are not important. But if you want to follow with a physical copy, this is the version that I am using. Okay? Let me put this down. Here we go. Page seven. So we start Harry Potter by learning about the Dursleys, Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, and their son, Dudley. First we have this line: "Mr. Dursley was the director of a firm named Grunnings, which made drills." So, a firm is a company, and Mr. Dursley was the director of this company, and they made drills. Now, drills are a power tool. Think of the tool that allows you to put screws into things, like: "[Drilling noise]". That's a drill. Okay? So he was a director of a firm named Grunnings, which made drills. Now, we have a description of him: "He was a big beefy man", "beefy", think of beef. So he was a little bit fat, and: "...with hardly any neck". Now, "hardly any" means almost zero. So, he was so big and round that you couldn't see his neck. Okay? Hardly any neck. "...although he did have a very large moustache".
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17 Common "WHEN" Questions in English 17 Common "WHEN" Questions in English
2 years ago En
Asking questions can be a challenge when learning any language. But they are essential to learning more about others and making new friends! In this lesson, I look at the construction and pronunciation of many common WHEN questions in English. Some of these include: "When were you born?", "When do you wake up?", "When are you free?", and "When did you arrive?". After watching, test your understanding with my quiz: http://www.engvid.com/17-common-when-questions-in-english/ Next, watch my lesson on COMMON 'WHERE' QUESTIONS IN ENGLISH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0u-cF56klw TRANSCRIPT Oh, hey. When did you get here? I'm glad you came. Just give me a second. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Common 'When' Questions", "When" in English. So, when we ask a question with "When", we want to know the time that something happened, generally happens, will happen, etc. So, today, I am going to look at some of the most common questions you can ask with this question word, and we will focus not only on the structure, but also getting fluent with these questions, making sure we're pronouncing them correctly, and making sure the intonation is good, and that the fluency is nice and sharp, and quick and fast. Okay? So, let's start from the beginning. Your beginning. "When is your birthday?" Okay? So, here, most commonly, you're using the contraction. Right? So quickly, you would say: "When's your birthday?" Okay? So, everyone, if you can just repeat after me: "When's your birthday?" Excellent. Now, a similar question asking about the date of your birth is: "When were you born?" Okay? Now, let's try this a little quicker, repeat after me: "When were you born?" All right? Excellent. And next we have a series of questions that ask about bed, pretty much. So, for example: "Hey. When do you wake up?", "get up?", "get out of bed?", or "go to bed?" Now, obviously the first three in the morning or maybe in the afternoon after a siesta or a nap, depending on your schedule. They relate to getting out of bed. So: "When do you wake up in the morning?" open your eyes. "When do you get up?" like, leave your bed. Or: "...get out of bed?" which is literally, you know, leaving your bed. Or, at night: "When do you go to bed?" Now, of course, these are routines, habits. You can use words like: "When do you normally get up?", "When do you usually get up?", or "wake up?", or "go to bed?" So, let's repeat them after me: "When do you wake up?", "When do you normally get up?", "When do you usually get out of bed?" Now, did you listen to that? I said: "...get outta bed", not just: "get out of", but "get outta". So, one more time: "When do you get out of bed?" All right? And last one: "When do you go to bed?" Very good. Okay, next: "When is __________?" So: "When is this?", "that?", "it?", "When is it?" This can be anything, this can be an event or the start of a movie, or something like that. Or the release date of the movie. So, for example: "When is the party?", "When is class?", "When is the conference?", "When is the Retro Fan Expo in San Francisco?" I guess that's a thing, maybe. I don't know. Okay? So: "When is it?", "When is that?", "When is this?" So, you get like something from your friend and it looks like an exciting event is coming, and you say: "Oh, when is this?" Right? So, repeat after me, we'll do all three: "When is this?", "When is that?", "When is it?" Very good. Okay. Now, if you're a student, the next question can be very common. So, you would ask your professor or maybe one of your friends because you didn't attend an important class, or you attended the class but you were not paying attention, and you have an assignment, a test, or you have something you need to write and you need to give it to the professor, say: "Hey. When is this/that/it due?" Now, when something is due it means you must complete it and submit it to your professor by that date. So, let's do the three questions, and you can just repeat them after me: "When is this due?", "When is that due?", "When's it due?" Okay, good. Now, you noticed I said: "When's", right? "When's it", "When's it". So, make sure you're listening when I'm using the contraction as well. All right. Next, if you want to invite your friends, you know, for dinner or to go have a coffee or just to hang out at your house or something, you can ask: "Hey. When are you free?" or "When are you available?" Okay? So, your schedule, you know, you're working here or you're in school here or you have a birthday party here. I want to see you: "When are you free?" or "When are you available?" So, repeat after me: "When are you free?", "When are you available?" Good. Now, this can also be in the workplace.
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Real English Vocabulary: At the BANK Real English Vocabulary: At the BANK
2 years ago En
This is a practical vocabulary lesson about words we use at the bank. Banking has a set of specialized vocabulary, and you may be nervous to go to the bank in an English-speaking country. But knowing some useful words will make it easy and pleasant for you. In this lesson, I will teach you the meaning of "bank teller", "PIN", "investments", "account", "deposit", "withdraw", and many more terms associated with going to the bank. If you want to feel more confident when going to the bank and speaking in English, watch this lesson and complete the quiz. After that, you'll be in business! http://www.engvid.com/real-english-vocabulary-at-the-bank/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Bank Vocabulary". Today, we're going to talk about going to the bank, and the different things you can do, and the different verbs associated and nouns associated with this very common experience. So, first, when you enter the bank, you have to "get in line" or "get in the queue". Now, specifically, in the United States, even in Canada, we use the word "line" when you're waiting to see someone at the bank. If you are in other parts of the world, specifically England, you can also call a line a "queue", so you get in the queue or get in line. Next, once it's your turn to, you know, do your business at the bank, you see a "bank teller". So, the name of the person who helps you at the bank is the teller. And after you see the bank teller, if you already have an account with the bank, you have to use your bank card and put in your "PIN". Your "PIN" is your personal identification number, your code, your password. Right? Now, once this is done, you're ready, the bank teller can see your account. Or maybe it's your first time and you didn't put in a PIN, there are different things you can do and ask for when you're at the bank. Number one, you can say: "Hi. I'd like to open an account", or "close an account". Now, again the two most common types of accounts at a bank are a checking account and a savings account. So your checking is your everyday spending. This is what you use your debit card for. Right? So, I'm just going to put "debit card" here. Your debit card is your bank card, and this is what you use to make payments when you go out to restaurants, movie theaters, etc. Okay, you can also transfer money when you are at the bank. So if you'd like to move some money from your checking account, for example, to one of your other accounts, such as a savings account or maybe a joint account that you have with your partner, husband, wife, etc., you can ask to do that. You can say: "Hi. I'd like to transfer $200 from my checking account to my savings account." And again, this is if you don't do online banking, which solves a lot of these issues. Now, instead of transferring money, you can also "deposit" money or "make a deposit". This means you are putting money into your accounts. So if you, you know, receive a check from the government, for example, or maybe your workplace still gives checks (it still happens, it does), you can deposit that check. And "deposit it" means put that money into your account. You can "withdraw". Now, "to withdraw" is to take out money. So, these two are really the most common verbs when you're talking about exchanging money with the bank, whether you're in the bank or at an ATM machine. So you deposit, which means you put money in; withdraw means you take money out. So you can withdraw or take out money. And the term we can also use is you can make a "withdrawal". And you'll see the "al" here, this means that, again, this is a noun in this case. The verb, there's no "al" at the end; it's just "withdraw". Withdraw money. You can "pay a bill". So, again, bills are our favourite things in the world, like pay for your electricity at your house, or your television, internet, etc. Now, again, this doesn't only have to be for those common things, because most people today, you have an automatic withdraw happens when you pay for a bill. But again, sometimes you get something where you have to go to the bank to pay the bill. If you get something from the Ministry of Transportation or something from the government, and it's unclear what you have to do to pay something online, you can go to the bank and you can pay that bill. Also, you can "exchange currency". So if you are travelling somewhere and you only have money from your country, you can change that money. And again, the name for "money" in this case is "currency", like the dollar is one type of currency, the yen is another type of currency. And you can ask the bank: "What's your rate?" because different places, exchange offices, banks, will have different rates for your currency. So, for example, the bank might say, if I'm travelling from Canada to the United States, they might say: "95 cents per dollar." Okay? So for every dollar that I have Canadian, I receive 95 cents American.
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The 25 Most Common Verbs in English The 25 Most Common Verbs in English
2 years ago En
What are the most common English verbs? In this simple and fun lesson, I'll show you the 25 most common verbs. You need to know these (and you need to know them well!) if you want to become a fluent English speaker. Learn the present, past, and past participle forms of the verbs. I'll give three example sentences for each verb. Some of the verbs in this lesson include: have, make, do, see, know, and look. Don't miss this essential English vocabulary lesson! TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/the-25-most-common-verbs-in-english/ WATCH OVER 1000 OTHER FREE ENGLISH LESSON VIDEOS: http://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking and welcome to this lesson on "The 25 Most Common English Verbs". 25. How did I decide which 25 verbs to pick? I just thought about it, and I thought: "I use this word a lot, this word a lot, and this word a lot." No, I didn't do that. This list is actually composed of many linguists, many websites, many different people all over the place who have decided that: "Yeah, these are the 25 words that most people use." So what I'm going to do is just very straightforward, I will give you the name of the verb, the pronunciation of the present form, the past form, and the past participle form, and I will give you three examples that will provide context for the verb so that you understand its meaning clearly. I recommend that you watch this video multiple times so that you can master all of these verbs. Here we go. "Be": "be", "am", "is", "are"; "was", "were"; "been". "She is a fantastic writer.", "They were home all day yesterday.", "I've been re-reading Harry Potter lately." "Have": "have", "has"; "had"; "had". "He has two brothers.", "We had a great time last night.", "I'm having a cup of coffee." "Do": "do", "does"; "did"; "done". "Have you done your homework?", "I'll do the laundry later.", "I did well on my test!" "Go": "go", "went", "gone". "Where did you go last night?", "We're going to Niagara Falls this weekend.", "See you later! I'm going home!" "Say": "say", "said", "said". "Wait. What did she say?", "You said I could trust you!", "Don't say anything." Shh. "Get"; "got"; "got" (British English), "gotten" (American English). "He got a new job!", "You should get new shoes.", "I think I'm getting a headache." "Make": "make", "made", "made". "We've made some mistakes.", "The kids are making a lot of noise.", "Look! I made a model car!" "Know": "know", "knew", "known". "I don't know your name.", "We've known each other for 8 years.", "Hey. Do you know who this is?" "Think": "think", "thought", "thought". "What do you think about this?", "She'll think this is a terrible idea.", "Let me think about that for a minute." "See": "see", "saw", "seen". "I'll see you later.", "Has anyone seen Jack today?", "Have you seen this video?" "Take": "take", "took", "taken". "She's taking a philosophy class this semester.", "I would never take anything from him!", "I'm going to take a shower." "Come": "come", "came", "come". "He had never come later before.", "Hey. Mariana is coming over later.", "Wait for me! I'm coming!" "Want": "want", "wanted", "wanted". "Come on. What do you want for your birthday?", "I've always wanted to have a dog.", "Who wants to see Star Wars again? Anyone?" "Use": "use", "used", "used". "I've never used this before.", "Have you ever used this before?", "What do you use this for? Oh." "Find": "find", "found", "found". "Did you find the restaurant?", "Have they found life on Mars yet?", "I can't find my keys." "Give": "give", "gave", "given". "She'll be given her diploma tomorrow.", "Who gave you that pen? Who gave you that pen? That's my pen.", "I'll give this to you if you promise to give it back." "Tell": "tell", "told", "told". "I won't tell your secret to anyone. I swear.", "Tell her the truth!", "Wait. What did you tell your mom about me?" "Work": "work", "worked", "worked". "Where do you work?", "She has worked here since 2014.", "How does this thing work?" "Call": "call", "called", "called". "I'll call you after work.", "Your mom called while you were out.", "Hey. Did you just call me?" "Ask", "asked", "asked". "Don't be afraid to ask questions.", "She asked where I lived.", "You can ask me anything. Anything." "Try": "try", "tried", "tried". "I'm trying to find a new job.", "She's been trying to contact me.", "Have you tried learning English on YouTube? Hmm?"
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Words that belong together: Adverb-Adjective Collocations in English Words that belong together: Adverb-Adjective Collocations in English
2 years ago En
Does your language have words that just sound good together? In English, these are called collocations. In this important English vocabulary lesson, you'll learn 10 common adverb-adjective combinations. These include expressions such as "seriously injured", "highly probable", "totally wrong", "virtually impossible", "cautiously optimistic", and more! If you want to improve your vocabulary and sound like a native English speaker, this lesson is a must, especially for intermediate and advanced level English students. Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/words-that-belong-together-adverb-adjective-collocations-in-english/ and see how high you score! TRANSCRIPT That is absolutely delicious. Oh, hey. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Adverb and Adjective Collocations". Now, "collocations" is just another fancy way to say combinations. And specifically, these are adverbs like: "very", "really", "seriously", "incredibly", "absolutely", and adjectives like: "hot", "cold", "injured", "wet", whatever. And these are ones that go together commonly. Okay? So, let me put my coffee down, and we'll get started with the lesson. Today we're going to look at 10 of them. So, first, we have: "Seriously injured" or "Seriously hurt". If you watch a lot of sports, you will hear this. Okay? So, for example: "She was seriously injured in the 2nd half." Now, for me, when I was around 23-24 years old, I used to play football just a little bit, and one time I was playing and I twisted my ankle, and I heard the muscle rip a little bit. It was very painful, and I was seriously hurt, seriously injured, and I couldn't walk for about two weeks. So it was a... It was a tough time. All right? So, again: "seriously injured", "seriously hurt". You could just say: "hurt", "really hurt", "very hurt", but for some reason, the word "seriously" and the word "injured" have been put together time and time again. They sound beautiful together to people. Next: "highly probable", "highly likely". So, if something is highly probable, highly likely, it means there is an excellent chance that it will happen. So, in the weather report, you might hear: "Rain is highly probable tomorrow." It is highly probable that it will rain. Okay? So, very likely, very possible or probable. So, again: "highly probable", "highly likely". Next: "cautiously optimistic". Now, if you are an optimistic person but, you know, something is coming and you're optimistic, but you're carefully optimistic, you're not sure 100% how optimistic to be - you can say: "I'm cautiously optimistic." Okay? So, for example: "I'm cautiously optimistic about the next Star Trek movie." So, I have enjoyed the first two Star Trek movies directed by J. J. Abrams. There's a third one coming where he's the producer, and the director is the guy who did The Fast and the Furious. So, The Fast and the Furious director is doing a Star Trek movie, and in the trailer, like, Captain Kirk is on a motorbike? I don't know. I don't know. But I enjoyed the first two movies. I think I'll enjoy the third one, but I'm cautiously optimistic that it will be good. Okay. And if at this time the movie has been released, and hopefully it's great; if it was bad, I'm sorry. Next: "totally wrong", "totally wrong". All right? So, you could just say something is wrong, but people commonly say: "That is totally wrong." All right? "Your answer was totally wrong." Totally incorrect. Absolutely incorrect. Okay? So, you can imagine you can use this in a variety of contexts. Next: "incredibly lazy". Okay? So: "He was incredibly lazy as a kid." Like, let's say this kid, whoever he was, just played video games all day, ate Doritos chips, drank Coke, skipped school all the time. I don't know, never did anything. His parents told him to do stuff, he didn't do it. He was incredibly lazy. So you can say: "Oh my god, my sister is so incredibly lazy." Or: "She is so incredibly lazy." My uncle, or my cousin, or my aunt, or my best friend is incredibly lazy. They are so lazy that it is incredible. All right? So, let's go and look at five more. "Virtually impossible". So, "virtually impossible" means something is practically, or almost, absolutely not possible. So: "This quiz is virtually impossible!" Some video games, if they're very difficult, you're like: "This game is virtually impossible to beat! I can't finish it." Like Dark Souls. Or when I was a kid... What was a game that was really difficult to beat? I had this game for the Nintendo Entertainment System called Time Lord, and I could never get past, like, the fourth level. It was a pirate ship, and I had no idea how to finish it. Or the original Ninja Turtles video game for the NES was also virtually impossible. Bad memories. Okay. "Absolutely incredible". So, at the time of this video, you know, Star Wars episode seven is kind of a big deal, and I would say that: "Star Wars was absolutely incredible!"
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What is an oxymoron? Definition and 20 funny examples! What is an oxymoron? Definition and 20 funny examples!
2 years ago En
Do you know what an oxymoron is? This video starts with a quick definition of oxymorons. They're a funny part of the English language! Oxymorons are figures of speech that have two contradicting terms. Using oxymorons correctly will make your English speaking and writing more descriptive. They're fun to learn and are a great boost for your vocabulary, too. In this lesson, I'll share 20 oxymorons that are common in everyday English, I'll explain them, and I'll give you examples of how they are used. So don't be scared! Oxymorons are fun and easy! Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/what-is-an-oxymoron/ to make sure you know these phrases correctly, then start using them in your own conversations! TRANSCRIPT Ah. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "20 English Oxymorons". So, let's get right to it. An "oxymoron" is a figure of speech that has two contradictory or opposite words appearing side by side. So, basically, it's a combination of two words that really have opposite meanings, but we use them, you know, regularly in sentences and phrases. So, the origin of the word "oxymoron" is from the Greek for "oxy" and "moron", which means sharp and dull. "Dull" is the opposite of "sharp". So, you can have a sharp knife or a dull knife. A dull knife doesn't cut very well. Right? Which itself is oxymoronic. So, these combinations of words here are oxymoronic. What I'm going to do in this video is first I will review every single one of the oxymorons. So, if you are already a native English speaker, you can kind of just read the oxymorons with me, get a good laugh, continue with your day, and watch whatever other cat videos you want to watch today on YouTube. And if you are a non-native English speaker, after reviewing everything, I'm going to go back one by one, and give a more detailed explanation. All right? So, let's begin. Number one: "alone together", "crash landing", "devout atheist", "exact estimate", "found missing", "minor miracle", "old news", "only choice", "freezer burn", "growing smaller", "jumbo shrimp", "loosely sealed", "loud whisper", "original copy", "same difference", "seriously funny", "small crowd", "student teacher", "unbiased opinion", "working vacation". Okay. Now, let's look at these one by one, and explain why they are oxymoronic. One: "alone together". The word "alone" means to be by yourself, so how can you be alone when there's another person or a group of people with you? You're not alone. You're with other people. Right? Okay. A "crash landing". So, an airplane can land or it can crash. Right? So, these things are opposites. "To crash" means to just smash into the ground, and "to land" typically means to land smoothly with the plane, and to touch down with no problems. So, a crash landing doesn't really make sense. A "devout atheist". So, an atheist is a person who doesn't believe in God. The word "devout" is an adjective that means highly devoted, usually in a spiritual sense. So, can an atheist show, like, devotion to not believing in something? Usually, if you are a devout, for example, a devout Christian or a devout Muslim or a devout Hindu - you show devotion to, you know, your God or your Gods. Whereas an atheist doesn't really have a God or believe in God, so they can't really have devotion for something. Right? All right. An "exact estimate". An estimate is a guess, it's not exactly a precise figure. So, if you go to the mechanic to fix your car and you ask: "How much money will this cost?" and the mechanic says: "Probably $400-$450", that's the estimate. Now, "exact" means exactly the number. You can't estimate exactly the number. You can only estimate a guess, or around a specific number. "Found missing". So, if a child goes missing, they get lost or kidnapped from their parents, and then they are found by the police, in the news people say: "The child was found missing." But you found them, so they're not missing anymore. Right? Okay. Next: "minor miracle". Going back to the religious term a little bit. A miracle is something that cannot be explained by science. It's something that is so amazing that it goes against the laws of nature. So, really, something is miraculous, it's amazing, incredible. It can't be small, it can't be minor. It's something massive and huge. Right? Next: "old news". "News" means things that are current, things that are happening now. So, how can news be old? Maybe yesterday's news kind of, but really, the two terms collide with each other. Next: "only choice". Now, "choice" means you have more than one option. Okay? If you only have one choice, that's not a choice. So you can't have an only choice, you must have multiple choices. All right?
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Fix these basic English pronunciation mistakes! Fix these basic English pronunciation mistakes!
2 years ago En
Do you make these common pronunciation mistakes? Good pronunciation is needed to be understood by native English speakers. In this important lesson you'll have a chance to practice your pronunciation by hearing and repeating vocabulary. I chose words that many of my students pronounce incorrectly in my classes. It doesn't matter if you speak Spanish, Hindi, Portuguese, Hebrew, Arabic, Vietnamese, French, or any other language – there is a good chance you have been pronouncing some of these words incorrectly. Fix these pronunciation mistakes today and you'll get closer to having a native speaker accent, be understood more easily, and sound much more fluent in English! https://www.engvid.com/fix-these-basic-english-pronunciation-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Commonly Mispronounced Words". So, these are some of the common pronunciation mistakes that I have heard in my experience as an English teacher from new English learners. Now, it doesn't matter if you're Russian, if you're a Spanish speaker, if you're Korean, if you're Japanese, if you're Arabic - I've heard these mistakes come from all over the place. So, today, I'm going to look at some of the most common pronunciation mistakes, the most common mispronounced words so that you can fix these mistakes and never make them again, and you'll sound more fluent, more natural. So, let's do it. First word: "ask". Okay, so you were supposed to repeat, there. All right? Did you do it? So, again, it's not: "axe", but "ask". So repeat after me: "ask". Good. Now, repeat this question, repeat this sentence: "Ask him a question." Okay, good. Next, not: "boos", but "bus". Repeat it one more time, one more time. "Bus". Okay, so it's "uh", right? It's an "uh" sound. It's not "oo", but "uh", "bus". Now, there's a trick here because the next word is "busy", and some students confuse this, because they actually know how to pronounce "bus", but then they try adding the same pronunciation rule from "bus" to "busy", and they say "busy", which is not correct. So, the correct word... The correct pronunciation of this word is "busy". So, repeat after me one more time: "busy". Excellent. Next, very common mistake, especially when students try to say it in a weird, plural way. So, I had a Korean student who was reading Edgar Allan Poe, and the word "clothes" is in the book a couple of times, like 2-3 times on one page. And she's reading, and she keeps saying: "closes", "closes", "closes", as if it's plural. It's not "closes", it is "clothes". Think of "open", "close", same pronunciation. All right? So, one more time, repeat: "clothes". Perfect. Next: "comfortable". Not: "com-fort-able". Okay? But: "comftrabull", so repeat after me one more time: "comfortable". All right, let's take it apart. This one is a little longer: "com-ftra, ftra, bull", "comfortable". All right. It's tough. Next, not "edu", but "edju", "edjucation", so there's a "je", "je", "je", "je", "je" sound. Si... Excuse me. Such as: "judge". Right? So, "education." Repeat after me. "Education". All right. Next, not "famoos", but "famous". Repeat it one more time, faster this time. "Famous". All right. So, the second part is a "miss" not "famoos", a "miss", "miss", like: "I miss you", okay? And next, same thing, not "lettoos", but "lettuce". "Lettuce". Okay? So, it's "lettuce". Good. Next, not "prevate", "private", so "i". "Private". Exaggerate it a little bit, it makes it a little bit more fun. So, one more time: "private". Now, in a normal conversation, you would just say: "private". Okay? Now, that second part "vit", "private". Next, the opposite of "private" is not "pooblic", but "pu-, public". Repeat it one more time. "Public". It's kind of like you're just letting a puff of air let go from your mouth, "pu", "public". Okay, good. And next, not "salmon". The "l" is silent in this word, so a salmon is a fish, the most delicious fish in my opinion, and it is pronounced: "samon", "salmon". Okay, very good. And next, not "stoody", but "study". "Stu-dy". Okay. So, it is not "stoo", but "stu", it's an "uh", "uh" sound. So, repeat it after me very quickly, here: "study". And finally, the name of our website. Whew, now, this is a mistake that I make. Go back, listen to my videos, guys, I say "angVid" a lot, especially in like 2011, 2012, I say: "Thanks for clicking on angVid.com, angVid.com." I have made a mistake, everyone. It is "eng". We don't say "Anglish", we say "English". The name of our site is engVid.com. I'm sorry. Even I make mistakes. So, one more time we're going to go through the words from the top to the bottom, from the top again to the bottom again, and I'm going to ask you to repeat after me, so let's do it. "Ask", "bus", "busy", "clothes", "comfortable", "education", "famous", "lettuce", "private", "public", "salmon", "study", "engVid".
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English Vocabulary: 10 adjectives invented by Shakespeare English Vocabulary: 10 adjectives invented by Shakespeare
3 years ago En
Did you know that William Shakespeare added more than 2000 words to the English language? That's right! In this lesson, we'll look at 10 adjectives that were invented by Shakespeare. You'll learn the meaning of each of the words and how to pronounce them correctly. Often, Shakespeare invented these words by turning nouns into adjectives. Many of the words may have been used in English already, but Shakespeare was the first to put them down, and that's how they grew to become parts of the language that are still with us today. Native English speakers use this vocabulary in everyday speech and in writing. This lesson has excellent advanced vocabulary that you'll learn easily because you'll get the definitions and examples, and I'll tell you the most common contexts you'll hear these words in. To continue learning with Shakespeare, sign up for a free trial with Audible at http://www.engvid.com/out/audiblealex and you'll be able to download a FREE audiobook of one of Shakespeare's plays. Take the quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-10-adjectives-invented-by-shakespeare/ TRANSCRIPT Shake, shake, shake. Shake, shake, shake. William Shakespeare. William Shakespeare. Ow! Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on learning English with William Shakespeare. Today, we are going to look at some vocabulary, specifically, some adjectives that are credited to William Shakespeare. Now, if you've been living under a rock, maybe you don't know that William Shakespeare is one of the most famous English playwrights and writers in general. He has almost 2,000 words that are credited to him. This doesn't mean the words didn't exist before him, but it is definitely the first time that people saw them in print. So, today, we are going to look at 10 adjectives. Now, what was cool about William Shakespeare is that he would take verbs, he would take nouns, and he would just mash them together. And if a word, you know, didn't exist that he needed that he really felt would make the scene that was necessary for the dialogue, he created it. So, what we're going to do is look at some of those words now. Let me put my book down, and we can begin. Okay, number one: "lackluster". So, this will also be a pronunciation lesson for you guys. Repeat after me: "lackluster". Okay. "Lackluster" means something is without vitality, without brilliance, or without spirit or life. So, a movie can be lackluster, a performance in a movie can be lackluster, or on stage. An experience can be lackluster, or a presentation can be lackluster. Many other things can be lackluster, but these are some common examples. And again, the examples I will give you today will be the most common ones that are associated with these adjectives. So, you can say: -"How was the movie?" -"Mm, it was lackluster." Okay? It didn't have enough light or life to it. "How was the performance?" if you go to see a stage play, a Cirque du Soleil. Cirque du Soleil is never lackluster, but imagine, you know, maybe the performers on that day, they were all sick, and there were lots of accidents. That might be entertaining, but anyway, you can say: "It was lackluster." There wasn't enough vitality, enough spirit, enough life in it. Next: "cold-blooded", so you see the word "cold", you see the word "blood", Shakespeare took the word "blood" and added "ed" to it, and basically turned a noun, "blood", into an adjective. "Cold-blooded". "Cold-blooded" means without emotion. So, a killer, a criminal, a murderer, or a villain. A villain is the opposite of a hero. Now, you might think: "When am I ever going to use this word?" Well, this word is very common in crime dramas, like CSI or like Law & Order, or in movies where there are killers and murderers. A very happy topic. It's why I'm wearing all black today. So, next, we have "worthless". "Worthless" means without value; zero, nada, zilch. Okay? If something is worthless, it has no value. An object can be worthless. An effort to do something can be worthless. An idea, you might say, is worthless. It can't be used. It has no use. So, for example, I have a rock, and this rock has no value. And we say the rock is worthless. Or if you're in a fight and in the fight you have a feather... Does...? You know, does a feather have any use in a fight? Say: "No, this is worthless. I can't use this to fight", unless it's a very sharp feather, maybe. Next: "tranquil". Now, "tranquil" means-breathe-peaceful, calm, serene. Okay? So, a place, usually, we say is tranquil. An experience or a feeling that you have can be tranquil as well. So, if I go to, you know, a place to meditate on top of a mountain and I am at peace with everything, the mood is tranquil. Okay? This is also where we get tranquilizer darts-right?-that make someone just fall down, and be calm, and fall asleep. So, that's "tranquil".
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Learn English with 5 Stupid Jokes! Learn English with 5 Stupid Jokes!
3 years ago En
Learning English can be FUNNY! This special lesson is all about simple, easy jokes that dads tell their kids. We call them these "dad jokes". These jokes are a great way to learn English because they are based on pronunciation, puns, and vocabulary. You'll hear five simple dad jokes along with explanations. I'll also go over the vocabulary in detail so you can really master some new vocabulary. Take the quiz, and practice speaking by telling these jokes to your family and friends. Most importantly, continue having fun with your English! Take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-with-5-stupid-jokes/ And try a free audiobook, courtesy of Alex: http://www.engvid.com/out/audiblealex TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on improving your English with dad jokes. "Dad jokes?" you ask. "What are dad jokes?" Simply put, dad jokes are jokes that dads tell their kids in an effort to make them laugh, when in reality, they usually just make them roll their eyes or groan. Err. But, dad jokes can be an excellent way to improve your English, because they often play with word meanings and word sounds. So, especially if you are an intermediate level English learner, dad jokes can be a great way to enter the world of English jokes. So, let's look at some examples now, and we'll come back and talk about 'em. Hey, Leah, I got a good one. Why couldn't Dracula's wife fall asleep? Don't know? Because of his coffin! Get it? Because coffin is where, you know, Dracula sleeps, and, like, it rhymes with "coughing", [coughs], so Dracula's wife couldn't fall asleep because of his coughing. It's pretty good? No? Okay. I bet your friend Caitlin would have laughed. It's so good. Hey, Caitlin, I got a good one. What kind of music do mummies listen to? Wrap music! Nothing? Get it? Because rap is a type of music, and mummies are wrapped in bandages. No? Still nothing. I bet your friend Roberta would have laughed. Come on, baby. Come on. Come on. Ugh. A commercial. Hey, Roberta, I got a good one. What was Beethoven's favourite food? Ba-na-na-na! Get it? Because, like, a banana is a food, and like, ba-na-na-na, that's, like, the beginning to Beethoven's 5th Symphony. No? Nothing? Kids these days. I bet your friend Maria would have laughed. Hey, Maria, I got a good one. Why didn't the shrimp share his treasure? Because he was a little shellfish! Huh, huh? You get it? Because, like, a shrimp and a crab and a lobster are, like, shellfish, and "shellfish" kind of rhymes with "selfish", which means you don't like to share. So, he didn't want to share his treasure. Still not funny, huh? Okay, I'm just going to get your Pop-tart, and I really, really bet that your friend Krystal would have laughed her head off. I always hate this. Krystal, I got a good one. What do calendars eat? Dates! Get it? Because, like, a date is a type of food, and like, dates are also found on a calendar. No? Nothing? What's wrong with kids these days? As you can see, dad jokes can be pretty funny, or just bad; it probably depends on your sense of humour. So, before we go, let's review these jokes, and then you can go and tell them to your friends, your family, and be laughed at or watch people roll their eyes, or you can just explain it to them, and... Whatever. So, number one: "Why couldn't Dracula's wife fall asleep? Because of his coffin!" So, like the dad said in the video, a coffin is the place where, you know, vampires sleep. "Coffin" sounds like "coughing". Pretty funny. Next: "What kind of music do mummies listen to? Wrap music!" So, again, rap is a type of music, but to wrap... Mummies are wrapped in bandages. Next: "What was Beethoven's favourite food? Ba-na-na-na!" Which is, you know, the beginning of his most famous symphony. Number four: "Why didn't the shrimp share his treasure? Because he was a little shellfish!" So, a shrimp, a crab, lobster, these are all shellfish. "Shellfish" sounds like "selfish", and "selfish" means you don't like to share. And finally: "What do calendars eat? Dates!" So, a date is a type of food, a date is also something you can find on a calendar. So, again, share them with your friends and let me know what kind of reaction you get. And if you enjoyed this video, as always, you can comment on it, like it, subscribe to the channel, check me out on Facebook and Twitter. And if you want to review the jokes, as always, you can check out the quiz on www.engvid.com, where you can also donate, if you want to support the site. So, until next time, thanks for clicking.
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3 Grammar Rules for REPORTED SPEECH 3 Grammar Rules for REPORTED SPEECH
3 years ago En
We use reported speech when we want to express what someone said. For example, "My mother said that she loved me." This communicates what your mother said at some point in the past. But if someone gives you an order in the imperative, like "Do your homework", how can you report this? Or what if someone asks you, "Are you from around here?" How would you report that? In this essential lesson, I will teach you three grammar rules on how to report speech when you receive an order, instructions, or are asked a yes/no question. So what did I say? "Alex told me to watch the video and then test my knowledge by completing the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/3-grammar-rules-for-reported-speech/ " TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Reported Speech". Now, in this lesson, I'm going to look at two very specific cases of reported speech, and I will expect that you already have the basic knowledge of how reported speech works. If you don't, we have a lot of videos on engVid to get you prepared. Benjamin has done a lesson on reported speech, Ronnie has done one, I've done one on "say" and "tell", so make sure you have the basics of this before you jump to this lesson, or watch this lesson first and then go back and look at those lessons for the basics. So, today, I'm going to tell you how to report imperatives and instructions, and how to report yes and no questions. So, imperatives. What's an imperative? It's a command: "Stop", "Don't do that", "Don't go there", "Study a lot of English if you want to improve", whatever it is. And instructions, you know, instructions, commands, these are very similar things. But an instruction could be something you read on the back of a box of cookies, and how to bake them, for example. So, first, let's look at an affirmative imperative, an affirmative instruction or a command. So if your teacher says: "Turn to page 209 in your textbook", how do you report this? Well, when you're reporting something that is a command, that is an imperative, that starts with a base verb like "go", "do", "play", "make", "turn", what you need to do after your reporting verb: "He said", you actually need to use "to" plus the base verb. Okay? So, here: "Turn to page 209." If I'm saying this and later you go to your friend, or your friend says: "What did he say?" You said: "Oh, he said to turn to page 209." So, we have: "Turn to page 209." When you're reporting, make sure you have "to" plus the base verb. Okay? "He said to turn to page 209.", "He told us to turn to page 209." So, here we have: "He told us to turn to page 209." And again, I'm going to assume that you already have the basics of reporting structure, but here specifically, this is an instruction, an imperative that you are reporting. So you have the base verb in the instruction, and then you have "to" plus the base verb when you're reporting it. Now, if you are reporting a negative command, for example: "Do not cross the street." Maybe you are reading a sign that says: "Do not cross when red." You know, when the light is red, for example. Well, how do you report a negative one? Very, very simple: "The sign said not to cross the street." Okay? So, here we have "to turn", here we have "not to cross". So, an imperative will always be in the present. You will always hear: "Stop", "Go", "Do", "Don't", okay? And because of that, when you are reporting a negative imperative, all you have to do is add "not" before "to" plus the base verb. So: "The teacher said not to do this.", "The sign said not to do this." Okay? So, again, if you are reading, let's say, an instruction manual for your new digital camera or your new phone and it says, okay: "Charge your phone before first use." So, before you use your phone, charge it for six hours, for example. So, say: -"Hey, what does the instruction manual say? My phone is not turning on." -"Ah, the instruction manual says to charge it", "to charge", the instructions say to charge for six hours before you use it for the first time. Now, let's move on to yes/no questions. So, we have three yes/no questions. "Do you need help?", "Is she here?", "Can you play guitar?" So, first: "Do you need help?" Yes or no? Present simple question. "He asked", and again, I'm going to give you a lot of different reporting verbs, here, like: "He asked", "He wanted to know", "He was wondering", and I'm going to assume that you already have this knowledge. "He asked me" or "He asked if I needed help." And again, you can probably already see this formula, here, "if", "if", "if". So, when you are reporting a yes/no question, in the reporting, you need to add an "if". Very simple.
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English Expressions with 'HAVE' English Expressions with 'HAVE'
3 years ago En
"Have" is one of the most common verbs in the English language. It can be used to express so much more than just possession. In this essential English lesson, I look at many expressions that use the verb "have", such as "have dinner", "have a drink", "have a problem", "have a baby", "have a great time", and more. We will also look at how to conjugate the verb in each of these expressions. For example, would you say, "I have coffee" or, "I am having coffee"? Both of these are correct in different scenarios. Watch the lesson to learn more! TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/english-expressions-with-have/ TRANSCRIPT Yes, I did the laundry. Yes, I had breakfast today. Okay, I'll talk to you later. Bye. Yeah, love you too. Okay, bye. That was my mom, sorry. Oh, hey. How's it going? I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Expressions with 'Have'". So, "have" is one of the most common verbs in the English language, and I know most of you know, you know, that you can use it for possession, but there are also a ton of other things and a ton of other expressions that we use with this verb. So, today, I will look at some of these expressions. First, let's say: "He has", "He had", "He will have", we have the present, the past, the future; "I have", "I will have", "I had". And, like I said, possession, here: "He has a car", "He had a PS4", "He has a son", or "He will have a son", if his wife or his girlfriend is pregnant, for example. So, here we have possession, something that belongs to you or is yours. Or if you have a family member, like: "I have two sisters, three brothers", etc. This is similar in most languages. Next: "I have a headache", or "I have a backache", or... I'm not going to say this, so I'll say: "He has cancer". So, if you are talking about a pain, or an illness, or a disease, you can also use the verb "have", so: "I have a headache", "I have a backache", "I have an earache", and a wide variety of pains that you have, you know, on your body. And here are some other ones that... You know, common expressions we have. You can say: "Teacher, teacher, I have a question." So, you can have a question. The teacher will, hopefully, have an answer. "I have an idea." You can have a question, you can have an idea. "I have something to say." You can have something to say. So, all of these, what you'll notice is they are all in a simple tense, and they can also be used in the perfect tenses, but there are some expressions that you can use in the simple tenses, and you can use in the perfect tenses, but you can also use them in the continuous tenses. So, for example, possessives, most of you probably know you cannot say: "I am having a car." You can only say: "I have a car." That's it. All right. Next, let's look at some where you can use the continuous tenses; past continuous, present continuous, future continuous, or the simple or perfect tenses. So, you can say: "I have" or "I am having breakfast", "lunch", or "dinner". So, when you are talking about meals that you eat during times of the day, use "have", and you can say: "I'm having lunch now.", "I'm having breakfast now.", "I'm going to have dinner with my mom." I'm going to have dinner with my mom later. It's true. All right. You can use this for drinks, like: "I have coffee every morning." Okay? Or: -"Hey, what are you drinking?" -"I'm having juice." Or: -"What would you like?" -"Mm, I will have water." Okay? Or beer, like: "I'm having a beer." You can have a beer; drink a beer. And next, food, in general. "A sandwich", "pizza", "a bowl of cereal", anything you can eat, you can say: "I'm having pizza for lunch today.", or "I had pizza for lunch.", or "I'm going to have a sandwich later." Okay? So, meals, drinks, food - all can use the verb "have". And I know some of this is repetition from my eating vocabulary video, so you can check that out, too, for more information like this. All right, next, some other common things, common expressions with the verb "have". You can say: "I have a problem." or "I'm having a problem." So, imagine that, you know, I record, I make videos, this thing isn't working. I'm having a problem with my video camera. And you can "have a great time" doing something, like: "Oh, I'm having a great time making this movie that we're doing today." So, let me put this away. A little noise in the background for you guys, makes it more real. And you can say: "I'm having a great time" if you are at a party, for example. If you are taking a course and people ask you: "How are you doing? Are you enjoying it?" You can say: "It's really difficult. I'm having a hard time understanding my teacher.", or "I'm having a hard time remembering the information or the material." So, hopefully, you're having a great time watching this video. And, next, you can "have a good day" or "have a bad day". And again, you can use the continuous tenses to talk about this. -"How is your day going?"
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English Vocabulary: Talking about WORK English Vocabulary: Talking about WORK
3 years ago En
Do you have a job? Do you know how to talk about it in English? In this vocabulary lesson, I will teach you some basic English words and expressions we use to talk about work. This lesson features vocabulary like "shift", "overtime", "get off", and common sentences such as, "I'm not getting enough hours", "I need to come in early", and "I need to stay late." Do not miss this essential lesson, and make sure to do the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-talking-about-work/ to review your new vocabulary! TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this vocabulary lesson on talking about work. In this lesson, we will learn some phrases that we use to talk about work with our friends, family, colleagues, etc. So, you will see some sentences, as well as some questions that you can use to talk about your job. So, let's start with some basic questions that people might ask about your work, your job. For example, the most basic one, if you have a job: "Where do you work?" Right? Where do you work? Do you work at Microsoft, maybe? Do you work at Google? Do you work somewhere else? And, this is a very common question, especially if you don't have, you know, like a set schedule where you work, you can say: "Hey. When do you start?" Right? If you ask a person: "When do you start? Do you start at 8 o'clock? 9 o'clock? 10 o'clock?" This might be a common question, you know, if you're wondering if you can have breakfast with someone or maybe lunch with someone, depending on if they work in the afternoon, if they work in the morning, etc. And obviously, you can also ask when a person finishes their job. "When do you finish?" Okay? Two other ways that we can ask when a person is finished are: "Hey. When are you off?" Okay? So, if you say: "When are you off?" you know, you're asking them: What time do you finish? Same with this: "When do you get off work?", "When do you get off work?", "When do you finish work?" All right? So, again, you can say: "When do you finish?", "When are you off?", "When do you get off work?" Now, some sentences that we can use. You can say: "Oh, I work day shift.", "I work afternoon shift." or "I work night shift." Now, a shift is basically the time... The period of time, the block of time of work that you do. So, if you work in a factory, usually factories, a lot of them are open 24 hours per day. They have some people who work in the daytime, some people work in the afternoon, some people work at nighttime. So you can say: "Oh, I'm on day shift.", "I am on afternoon shift.", "I am on night shift." Instead of saying, you know: "I work day shift, afternoon shift, night shift", you can also say: "I'm on days.", "I'm on afternoons.", "I'm on nights." And this can change, depending on how your schedule works. You can say: "I'm on afternoons this week, but next week I'm on days." And again, this is important information, depending on who you're talking to, if they want to get together with you for something, it's important to know. -"What shift are you on next week?" -"Next week I'm on nights, so that means that we can get together for dinner before I start work." Okay? Now, "overtime". "Overtime" is time that you work longer than you are expected to legally work. So, for example, in most companies... I'm just going to talk about the North American context. Typically, one week a person is expected to work in most jobs 40 hours per week. If you work beyond that, you can work overtime. Right? You work overtime. Or if you work eight hours per day, if you work more than eight hours per day, you work overtime. So a person, your friends, colleague, family member can ask you: "Hey. Are you doing overtime tonight?" Or: "Are you working overtime tonight?" And short form for overtime: you can also say "OT". "Are you doing OT tonight?" You can say: "Yeah, I'm staying OT." Or: "I'm staying for two hours of OT." for example. Okay, next: maybe a common sentence for you, maybe not; depends on who you are. So, for example, here I wrote: "Jackie called in sick last Friday." So if you are sick and you call your job to tell them: "I'm sick. I can't come today." you are calling in sick. So the phrase is "call in". Okay? You might... Your friend might also tell you: "Hey. Monday, you know, we're going to have a big party on Sunday night, so Monday you're going to be very tired. Just call in. Call in." Or: "Call in sick". Okay? I'm not recommending this, but it's something people do. Next: "I need a vacation." And if you want to say you have been working really hard, one expression you can use is: "I've been working like a dog." Okay? You think of a dog like [pants like a dog] like this, if you are working very hard, you can say: "I've been working like a dog."
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Basic English Lesson: How to Talk about Yourself Basic English Lesson: How to Talk about Yourself
3 years ago En Ru
So you want to meet other students and start practicing your English? You are going to need to learn how to talk about yourself. In this lesson, you will learn easy English sentences that will let you talk about yourself confidently. I will teach you how to make basic sentences in the first person. "I am", "I like", "I don't like", and "My name is" are some examples of how to begin a sentence when describing yourself to someone you have just met. I'll teach you what to say and how to say it. Watch this lesson, and then practice these basic sentences to perfect your beginner conversation skills. QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/basic-english-lesson-how-to-talk-about-yourself/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this beginner lesson on how to talk about yourself. So, like I mentioned, this is a great lesson for beginner students who want to build their confidence in English, and you can do this by learning some of the most common sentences you make when discussing yourself to other people. So, this includes things like giving a greeting, mentioning your name, your age, your nationality, your origin, your profession, your location or where you live, your likes, and your dislikes. So, in this video, I will talk about myself; and in the second part of the video, I am going to introduce one of my special friends, and talk about them. So, to begin, for a greeting, you can just say: "Hi!", "Hello!", or "Hey!" depending on how formal or informal you want to be. So, after, you know, introducing yourself to someone and saying: "Hi!", "Hello!" they will probably ask what your name is, or you can volunteer your name; give your name. So, I would say: "Hey! I'm Alex." Just like I do at the beginning of all of my videos. Or I can say: "My name is Alex." And this is another way to, obviously, mention your name; what you are called. Next, I would mention my age. So, I can talk about how old I am. And in English, we say: "I am", and then you list your age. Personally, I am 34 years old. If this is true, not true, I don't know; up to you to decide. In some languages, you say: "I have" plus your age. In English, use the verb "to be". "I am 34 years old.", "He is 26 years old.", "She is 37 years old." Okay? Make sure you use the verb "to be" for your age. Next: "I am Polish-Canadian." This is my nationality. So, you can say: "I am Brazilian.", "I am American.", "I am Columbian.", "I am Croatian." You know, whatever your nationality is. "I was born in Poland." This is my origin, so the place where my Mom gave birth to me. So, you can say: "I was born in", maybe your country or a different country. So, I have a friend who is Portuguese, lives in Canada, but he was born in France. It's weird, but, you know, it can happen. Next, my profession. "I am a teacher." It's very important when you talk about your profession in English to use an article before the profession. So, here, you see: "I am a teacher." Not: "I am teacher.", "I am a teacher.", "I am an engineer.", "He is a professor of psychology." Okay? Always, always, always mention an article with your profession. Next, my location. Where do I live? "I live in Montreal, Quebec." Okay? And you can say: "Hey! I live in Bogotá." Or: "I live in Rio de Janeiro." Or: "I live in Caracas, Venezuela." It's possible, too. Next: "I like reading, photography, and yoga." These are my likes. So, what do you like? You can say: "I like books. I like movies. I like..." I don't know. Painting, maybe. And finally: "I don't like high places." You can also say "heights". So, in general, I don't like heights. I feel very nervous when I go to Toronto, Ontario and I go to the top of the CN Tower, and look down. They have a glass floor. I can't step on the glass floor for very long, because I feel very nervous, very anxious. I don't like high places. Now, if you think that this is something that is easy, that's okay. Even if you're an intermediate or advanced student, using sentences like these can still help you to build your confidence and to improve your pronunciation. Specifically, when you say these things, you're supposed to be focusing on making them fluent and quick. So, now, I'm going to ask you some questions, and I want you to answer-okay?-with your own personal information. For example, I will ask: What's your name? And you will say: "My name is", hmm. You're talking to your computer screen, you're talking to me. Look around. Is anyone watching you? Are you in a computer lab? Are you at home? Are you on the bus? If you're on the bus, maybe don't do this exercise, but if you're in a safe place where people will not look at your... At you weird, come, do this exercise with me. So, let me ask you and you answer clearly, quickly, confidently. What's your name? How old are you? What's your nationality? Where are you from? What do you do? Where do you live? What do you like? What don't you like?
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5 ways to use the PRESENT CONTINUOUS verb tense in English 5 ways to use the PRESENT CONTINUOUS verb tense in English
3 years ago En
If you think the present continuous is only used to talk about actions that are happening in the present, think again. In this grammar lesson, I look at five different ways the present continuous (also called present progressive) can be used, including a pre-arranged future plan, an event that is happening during a particular period, repeated behaviors, and temporary situations. This is a great way to refresh what you already know about the present continuous and to expand on it. After watching, I am hoping you will check your understanding by completing the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/5-ways-to-use-the-present-continuous-verb-tense-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on five ways to use the present continuous, or present progressive, depending on which grammar book you read. So, today, we are going to look at five different ways that we use this very, very common grammar tense. Now, if you're watching this video, you might say: "Okay, I know the present continuous. I use it to talk about an action that is happening right now." Or maybe you're a little more advanced, and you say: "Okay, you can use it for an action happening now, and I know I can use it for future actions, too." This is correct. These are two ways that we're going to talk about today, but there will also be three more ways. So just to begin, as a reminder, this is the structure of the present continuous. You have a subject, the verb "to be", and a verb+ing. For example: I (subject) am (verb "to be") studying (verb+ing). "I am studying" is a present continuous sentence. Now, let's look at the five ways that we can use this tense. Number one, the most basic one: An action that is happening at this moment. -"What are you doing?" -"I'm watching YouTube videos." Okay? "I am studying.", "I am reading.", "I am listening to music." Now, in this moment. And, again, the most common question in this situation is: -"Hey. What are you doing?" -"I am doing this." Number two: An action that is happening during this period of time. Now, this means the period of time in your life right now, maybe the past week, two weeks, a few months. For example: "Hey. Are you still practicing piano?" You're not practicing piano at this moment, but practicing piano is something you do or have been doing in your life for a while. So, for example, you can say, you know: "Hey. What are you doing? Where do you go to school?" blah, blah, blah, and a person can say: "Oh, I'm studying at the University of", wherever. Okay? So if a person asks you: -"Where do you study?" -"I am studying at this university" or "this school". You are not studying there right now in the moment, but in your life this is happening right now. Number three: An action that is prearranged in the future. So this means you are almost 100% certain that this action or this event will happen, is going to happen. So, for example: -"What are you doing tomorrow?" -"Tomorrow? We're going to New York tomorrow. We are going 100%." Other examples: "My mom is visiting me this weekend.", "I'm seeing a movie tomorrow.", "I'm watching a play with my cousin." Okay? So anything where it's scheduled, it's prearranged, it's preplanned, you're almost 100% sure it's going to happen in the future. You can also use the present continuous in this way. One thing about number three is depending on, you know, who your grammar teacher is, you might hear sometimes: "You only use the present continuous if it's an action that is happening in the near future." This is incorrect. Okay? You can use the present continuous to talk about actions that are definitely in the near future, like: "We're going to New York tomorrow", but you can also talk about something that's going to happen in the distant future, too, using the present continuous, like, for example: "We are going to Cuba in November." Okay? "We are travelling to Australia next year." So here are examples of present continuous for prearranged things in the future, but they can be far away. Not just near future; far future, too. Number four: A temporary event or state/situation. So a person can be acting a certain way in the moment, and maybe they don't normally act this way; it's a temporary way of acting. For example: "Why are you being so selfish?" You are acting a certain way, you are being selfish in the moment and it's temporary, and maybe normally you are not selfish. Another example is... For example, if you are in a band, and you say: "Oh, normally Jack plays guitar, but today he's playing the bass." Now, again, normally he plays the guitar. Today, temporarily, he is playing the bass.
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Grammar: Using DO and DID to make a strong point in English Grammar: Using DO and DID to make a strong point in English
3 years ago En
"Do" and "did" are some of the most common words in English, but do you know how to use them to add contrast or emphasis? In this lesson we'll look at "do" and "did" in affirmative sentences. You'll learn to use them to make your English sound clearer, more interesting, and more fluent. Usually, you learn that "do" and "did" are only used in questions, negatives, and short answers, but we also use them to make strong points. You'll hear many examples of how this is done in spoken English. So if you do want to improve your English, watch this video and take the quiz at: http://www.engvid.com/grammar-using-do-and-did-to-make-a-strong-point-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Do and Did in Affirmative Sentences". So, by this point, you're probably familiar with using "do" and "did" in three different contexts. And specifically, I'm talking about "do" and "did" as auxiliary verbs. So you can use "do" and "did" most commonly in questions. So: "Where do you live?", "Do you like cheese?" for example. You can also use "do" and "did" in negatives, so: "I don't want to do that.", "He didn't start the test on time." And you can also use it in short answers, like: "Yes I do.", "No I don't.", "Yes he did.", "No she didn't." Okay? However, the focus of this lesson is on using "do" and "did" in affirmative sentences. And it is possible in two different contexts. So, like the board says, they can also be used in the affirmative to show, number one, contrast. So if you really want to emphasize a contrast between two different things, you can use "do" or "did" in the following way. Check out this example. "He didn't like the movie, but he did like the music." Okay? So if you go to a theatre and you watch a film, you can say: "Hmm, I didn't like this, but I did like this." So you're emphasizing a contrast. You can do this in many contexts. Many things where you have differing opinions or different feelings about something. If you go to a restaurant, you can say: "Mm, I didn't like the food, but I did like the service." So, the service was really good, but the food wasn't good. So: "I didn't like this, but I did like this.", "I don't like this, but I do like this." or: "I do want this or need this." etc. All right, secondly, you can use "do" and "did" to show emphasize or to give clarification to something. So what I mean by this is if you are walking through, you know, a department store and, hmm, you're looking at a refrigerator with your girlfriend, your boyfriend, your husband, or wife and they're trying to convince you to buy this fridge, this new refrigerator. And then you think: "Hmm, we do need a new fridge." So, we need a fridge, a new fridge. You can also say: "You know what? We do need a new fridge." So you are emphasizing your need for that refrigerator. You can also clarify: "Hey, why isn't...?" For example: -"Why isn't Mark here?" -"Well, he did say..." Not just: "He said", "He did say he was going to be late." So, if you're waiting for Mark, and you know what? Yeah, he did say that he was going to be late. So you're clarifying and you're emphasizing what he said. Okay? So, just as a reminder, "do" and "did" are not only for questions, not only for negatives, not only for short answers, but they can also be used to show contrast and to show emphasis. All right? So, now, you do need to do the quiz to make sure that you understood this material. So check out that quiz on www.engvid.com. And don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel. See you guys.
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Learn English Vocabulary: Talking about HIGHWAY DRIVING Learn English Vocabulary: Talking about HIGHWAY DRIVING
3 years ago En
As drivers or passengers, at some point we all use cars to get around. In this lesson, I'll teach you essential vocabulary and expressions we use to talk about driving on streets and highways. You may need to give someone driving directions in English, or perhaps you'll be describing your favourite driving routes -- we all have these conversations! Knowing this vocabulary is especially great to practice your English because drivers talk about driving as often as the weather. Learn about on-ramps, off-ramps, toll booths, passing lanes, merging, and more. Increase your vocabulary and your conversational confidence in English by learning to speak about driving! Most importantly, always be aware of driving conditions, and drive safely! Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-highway-driving/ TRANSCRIPT Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Talking About Highway Driving". So, today, we're going to look at some of the vocabulary that is associated with driving on the highway. So, if you have a car, if you've ever had a car; if you have ever ridden, driven on the highway, this vocabulary will help you to talk about this experience in English. Now, again, it's not only specific to the highway; it can also be about city driving. But a lot of it is just specific to the highway. So, for example, first: to get on the highway. So use the phrasal verb, if you're in the city: "Oh, I want to get on the highway." To get on the highway, you have to find an on-ramp. So, the on-ramp is the lane that goes on to the highway, that puts you on the highway. So you're driving and, you know, the person beside you might say: "Oh, look. There is an on-ramp." or: "There is the on-ramp." So on-ramp to get on the highway. Once you're on the on-ramp, you have to merge with traffic. So you're driving and let's say the traffic is here on this side, and you can see that people are driving fast, slow, etc. You have to match the speed and merge with the traffic. Next, you have to go with the flow of traffic. So drive the same speed or similar speed to what other drivers are driving. And again, you still have to do something, though, in relation to going with the flow of traffic. You have to go the speed limit. You can also use the verbs "drive" the speed limit, "follow" the speed limit, "respect" the speed limit. If you don't follow the speed limit or respect the speed limit, you could get a ticket, and this is called a speeding ticket. So don't speed. Again, you can use "speed" like a noun, you can also use it like a verb. So: "Don't speed. Don't get caught speeding." And again, don't switch lanes too often. So "switch" means to change. You can say: "Change lanes" or: "switch lanes". So when you're driving on the highway, say: "Don't switch lanes or change lanes too often." Again, if there is someone slower than you, you know, the person beside you might say: "Hey, can you switch lanes?" Or you might say: "Oh, I need to change lanes. This person is too slow." If the person is too slow, you can use the passing lane or the fast lane to pass slower cars. Now, again, I live in Canada, so to me, the passing lane is on the left side of the road. That is called the passing lane or the fast lane. So you can say: "Okay, get in passing lane and pass this car because he's driving too slow." Let's continue on with some more vocabulary. To use some highways, you have to pay for them. So to pay for the use of the highway, you use a toll booth. So you have to pay the toll at the toll booth. And again, the toll is usually pretty small; it depends where you go, obviously. Like, in the States, you can go through various toll booths and it can be very expensive by the time you drive across the country. But the amount you have to pay is called the toll. So you can say: "The toll was $2.", "The toll was $5." It's a $2 toll, for example. And again, the place where you pay, and you drive, and you give the money is called the toll booth. Next, some advice for you: don't get pulled over by the police. So, if you're driving too fast, you are speeding, the police can pull you over. So if they pull you over, you have to go to the side of the highway, get a ticket. So don't speed or don't get caught speeding. So you can tell your friend: "Oh, I got caught speeding." or: "I got a speeding ticket." And also, don't-the phrase is-drink and drive. So, don't drive and drive, meaning, you know, don't drink alcohol and then drive the car, or you can get pulled over by the police. And today, very important, don't text and drive either. Right? And finally, when you're finished, you have to exit or get off the highway. So, remember you get on the highway, and then when you exit, you get off the highway. To get off the highway, you need to find an exit. An exit can also be called an off-ramp. So you can say: "Okay, I'm going to take the next exit." or: "Take that exit." or: "Get on... Get off at that off-ramp." Okay?
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WH Questions in English: The most common WHERE Questions WH Questions in English: The most common WHERE Questions
3 years ago En
Does it take you a long time to answer questions in English? In this conversational lesson, I'll teach you more than ten common questions that start with "where". You improve your speaking by knowing the most common questions English speakers use in conversation. Learn to speak more fluently by practicing saying these questions the way native speakers say them. I'll give you a chance to listen and repeat after me. Some of the questions in this lesson include: "Where are you from?", "Where were you born?", "Where did you grow up?", and more. In the quiz for this lesson, you'll review the grammar and correct structure of these very common WH questions. Where do you go for more English lessons? http://www.engvid.com ! Where do you take the quiz? http://www.engvid.com/wh-questions-in-english-the-most-common-where-questions/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on "Common 'Where' Questions". So, in this lesson, I'm going to give you a lot of different, you know, questions, obviously, that we ask with the word "where". And specifically, I want you to use this lesson for listening practice and fluency practice. So, yes, you know, we will look at the structure and the meaning of the questions, but we'll also be looking at saying the questions quickly so that you can identify them if you hear them, or you will know how to say them quickly yourself, because some of them, you can cut words out, or when you say it quickly, it sounds a little bit differently than if you just cut word, word, word, word. So let's look at from the top, very common question if you're, you know, meeting someone or talking to someone at work or at school that's new and you don't know, or maybe you're meeting somebody at a party at your family's house or your friend's house, and you're curious about their origin, you can say: "Hey. Where were you born?" Right? "Where were you born?" So you can say: "Oh, I was born in Canada.", "I was born in Mexico.", "I was born in Palestine." Like: "Where were you born?" Again, this is slightly different from the question of: "Where are you from?" Because, again: "Where were you born?" you can specifically mention, you know, the hospital that you were born, but: "Where are you from?" like, you know: "Which country? Which area?" So, for example, me, I am from Poland. I live in Canada, but originally I'm from Poland, I can say. So: "Hey. Where did you grow up?" This is really good because "grow up" means, you know: Where did you have, kind of, your childhood, growing into a teenager experience? So, essentially, from the ages of... I guess it varies, depending on who you talk to, but kind of the memories you have as a child, probably from the age of 6 until you were like 14 to 16 years old - that 10-year period. -"Where did you grow up?" -"Oh, I grew up in Michigan." or "Oh, I grew up in Paris." If you're so lucky to grow up in Paris, that's pretty cool. So, a very common question: "Hey. Where do you work? Where do you work?" Right? Like, so: "I know your job, but where do you work?" "Where do you go to school?" Right? "Where do you work?" or "Where do you go to school?" Very common question. And, also, if you're making plans for the weekend, and maybe you're texting your friends or you're calling your friends. Let me get out my phone, here. And if you're calling your friend and you're making plans for tomorrow, you can say: "Yeah. Where do you want to go? Where do you want to go? Do you want to see a movie, or do you want to go out to eat? Hey. Where do you want to eat? Do you want to eat at the pizza place, or do you want to eat at the Italian restaurant? Where do you want to meet up?" So, "to meet up" means to meet, essentially. This is a phrasal verb that just means "to meet". Where do you want to see each other? Again, very common. "Where do you want to meet up? Where do you want to go? Where do you want to eat? What do you want to do?" Right? So: "Where are you going? Hey. Where are you going?" "Where are you?" If you're looking for someone and you're talking to them on the phone, and you're at a party or you're at a big concert, and you can ask them: "Hey. Where are you?" Right? "Where are you now?" Or even if you want to know... You want to meet with them later, right? And you can say: "Where are you? Like, are you at your parents' house? Are you at school? Are you at the library? Where are you now?" And finally: "Hey. Where is it?" So this can be anything. Right? "Where is the pool? Where is the library? Where is the movie theatre?"
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Learn English with the Pac-Man Method! Learn English with the Pac-Man Method!
3 years ago En
What do Pac-Man and learning English have in common? More than you think. In fact, there is a learning philosophy behind the game that can be applied to anything you want, including learning a new language. In this exciting lesson, you will learn about the importance of being flexible and confident as you learn English. You will also find out about the learning blocks you need to avoid or overcome if you want to be successful and get to the last level of the game. Ready? YOU CAN DO THIS! Wakka wakka wakka. http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-with-the-pac-man-method/ TRANSCRIPT [Pac-Man noises] Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this educational philosophy video on how to learn English with the Pac-Man method. Pac-Man? Educational philosophy? Huh? Now, before we start, we should learn a little bit about Pac-Man and his history. First, Pac-Man was originally a 1980s arcade game, a very popular one, as you can see by the t-shirt. And the goal of Pac-Man was to eat all of the pellets in a maze. Now, a pellet is a compressed, little ball. Think of something you can feed a bird or something you can feed a fish, or think of a pellet gun. In Pac-Man, these pellets represented food for Pac-Man to eat. Now, in the 1980s at the arcades, a little pellet, a little dot on the screen, it could have represented anything. So, it is a 1980s arcade game. The goal of Pac-Man is to eat all of the pellets in a maze. The difficult part about eating all of these pellets is that there are ghosts constantly chasing you, trying to kill you, attack you, eat you, and you have to avoid them. Now, you can fight back. How to fight back in Pac-Man is you need to eat a power pellet. And this power pellet turns the ghosts blue, and allows you to chase them and eat your enemies. What was really difficult about this game is that it had 256 levels. 2-5-6. Can you think about a game today that has that many levels? It's ridiculous. So, this was something that was really, really difficult to master, and it had a ton of levels, a ton of patterns and mazes and content that you had to memorize. Does this sound familiar to you? So let's see how this relates to English. Now, imagine for a moment you are Pac-Man. I'm Pac-Man. Every level, every maze in Pac-Man represents an element of the English language that you have to learn. So, a Pac-Man maze could represent an academic vocabulary list that you're trying to learn, it could represent a grammar tense, it could represent a pronunciation point that you are currently studying. For example, a Pac-Man maze could be the present continuous tense, it could be how to use "will" in many contexts. Now, what you have to do in mastering this vocabulary list, this grammar tense, this pronunciation point is complete the level by eating every single pellet of information in that level, before you can continue and do other things. Now, the ghosts, what do they represent? What does this guy represent? This guy, this guy, and this guy? These are blocks to learning. These blocks could be bad experiences you have had with English in the past. These could be fear about not knowing enough. A block to learning could be a negative person in your life who tells you: "You'll never learn this language." Avoid those people, just like you avoid the ghosts in the game. Now, a block to learning could be a bad teacher, someone who gives you bad information about English. And a block to learning, similar to fear, could be just your own low self-confidence. You know that feeling where you think: "I will never learn this language"? And I understand that feeling, because I am currently studying French, and I feel that way about French, so I'm right there with you. Now, how can I improve? How do I make sure that these blocks to learning are conquered, that I can destroy them, and get through them? Let's look at that. So, your goal when learning English with the Pac-Man method is to avoid those blocks to learning, triumphing over your fears, and growing in your own self-confidence as you get better, and better, and better with English the more time you spend with it. Just like the more time you spend with a Pac-Man video game... Well, we don't have arcades anymore with Pac-Man in them, really, but the more time you spend playing anything, the better you will be at it. Just like the more time you spend practicing English, studying English, listening to English - the more confident you will become and the more knowledgeable you will become. So, to improve and continue improving, what you need to do when learning something is eat those language power pellets, those things that teach you to study, understand, and practice, and to speak confidently. I'm not scared of you, I'm not scared of you, I'm not scared of you, and I'm not scared of you! I can do this!
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Learn English with STAR WARS! Learn English with STAR WARS!
3 years ago En
Can you learn English by watching a space fantasy from 1977? Absolutely! In order to get ready for Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens, I re-watched the original Star Wars film. Watch this video and follow the adventure, as I look at dialogue and discuss scenes from the movie. I will teach you vocabulary, phrases, and grammar used in the movie. I also get to hold a lightsaber and argue with Emperor Palpatine. Use the Force and learn some English! If you can't get enough of Star Wars, follow this link to sign up for a FREE 30-day trial at Audible, where you can download an excellent, 5+ hour original Star Wars radio drama, as well as many other Star Wars audiobooks: http://www.engvid.com/out/audiblealex Take the quiz on this lesson to test your mastery of the Force: http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-with-star-wars/ TRANSCRIPT: [Lightsaber noises] It's time to use the force and learn some English. [Star Wars music]. Hey, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on learning English with Star Wars. So, I am very excited because Star Wars, episode seven, The Force Awakens, is set to come out in theatres all across the world. Maybe it's already out at the time that you're watching this. If you're watching this years from now, maybe Star Wars episode seven is out, episode eight is out, episode nine is out, and we say that they're awesome, maybe they're terrible. Who knows? Anyway, what I thought that I would do in preparation for the movie is go back, watch the original, and teach you guys some English. Those of you who don't know, Star Wars is a very famous space fantasy film. "A-ahem." Yes, Emperor Palpatine? "I thought Star Wars was science-fiction." Well, Emperor Palpatine, that is a common opinion and a common misconception. You see, science-fiction means that it takes the technology, pushes it into the future to its most extreme. Now, Star Wars is closer to, like, Lord of the Rings, or, you know, a fantasy where there are creatures that simply can't exist. "Oh. Hmm. Carry on." Okay, so now that that's clear, what I'm going to do is tell you about the story and the characters of the original Star Wars, and I'm going to go through the movie, from beginning to end, and talk about some of the key dialogue, key vocabulary with you guys. And at the end of this, don't forget to check out the quiz. Hopefully, you'll have learned something. So, let's get on with it and learn English with Star Wars. Okay, so the story of the original Star Wars. In the beginning, there is an evil galactic empire that is spreading across the galaxy. What they're doing, what evil things they are accomplishing, we don't really know. They don't say, we just know they're bad. There's a small rebel group that is fighting back, and they're trying to take down this evil empire, and this rebel group has recently stolen some plans for a powerful weapon. Now, this weapon is being designed by the empire, and they call it the Death Star. And now, the Death Star is this big, round, globe ball battle station in the movie, and the rebels need to destroy it. They figure that if they have the plans, maybe they can find a weakness in the Death Star and destroy it. Will they destroy it? Wait. You'll find out later. And, again, at the beginning of the movie, the empire is chasing a small rebel ship, because they think this ship has the plans, and they're trying to get them back. So, that is the beginning of the movie. Now let's look at some of the characters. We have Luke Skywalker. Luke is a farm boy from the planet Tatooine, and he's the main hero, here. He's the one who's going to learn how to use the force and save the day. We have Princess Leia. She is there at the beginning of the movie on the small rebel ship, and what she's going to do is give instructions to R2D2, the little robot, to find Obi-Wan Kenobi. So, Princess Leia. We have Han Solo and Chewbacca. Han Solo is the pilot of the Millennium Falcon. Chewbacca or Chewy is the guy who just sounds like this: [Roaring noise]. He doesn't actually say anything, but somehow, Han Solo can understand him, based on a roar. It was the '70s, you know, people believed these things.
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English for Beginners: Keep in touch! English for Beginners: Keep in touch!
3 years ago En
Learn four common expressions you can use in letters and emails. The expressions include: "keep in touch", "stay in touch", "be in touch", and "get in touch". This is an essential class for beginners. These expressions are also useful in many social situations. I'll teach you how exactly to use these expressions, and when you should use each one. Make sure you've understood everything by taking the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-for-beginners-keep-in-touch/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this beginner lesson on "Keeping In Touch". So, today, I will look at some very common verbs that we use with the term "in touch", to talk about staying in contact and keeping communication with our friends, our relatives, and loved ones. So, "to stay in touch", or "keep in touch", or "be in touch", or "to get in touch", basically means to remain in contact or communication. To keep communication. Stay in contact, stay in communication with someone in your life. So, three verbs that we have here are: "keep", "stay", and "be". So, it's possible to say, you know: "Oh, don't worry. This person is leaving. But don't worry, I will keep in touch. I will stay in touch. I will be in touch." So, you can use this as an imperative. You could say: "Okay, keep in touch. Bye." You know, contact me, stay in contact, in communication with me. "Be in touch!", "Keep in touch!", "Stay in touch!" Let's look at some example sentences of different ways and different tenses we can use these phrases in. So: "We didn't keep in touch.", "We didn't stay in touch." are both possible. And, what you mean here is you had a friend and maybe you lost contact with the friend, and you want to communicate that: "We lost contact. We didn't stay in touch. We didn't keep in touch." You can also say: "We lost touch." So, we lost communication. We lost touch. Okay? And, again, you can also use: "be in touch". Now, again, the verb "to be" is special, so you can't say: "We didn't be in touch." You have to say, you know: "I was in touch with someone." Or: "I wasn't in touch with someone." And in this context, you're talking about contacting a company and maybe you contact them two times, and you say: "Oh, I was in touch with someone who works there. I was in communication, in contact with a person who works at that company." Okay, and I put "get in touch" as separate from these because "to get in touch" has a slightly different meaning than, you know, "keep", "stay", "be". So, these talk about the state of remaining; keeping and staying in touch. "To get in touch" means to initiate the communication, to start the contact, to get in touch. Okay? So, I have three example sentences. "Get in touch with me when you arrive." You're talking to a friend, the friend is coming to visit you by bus, by airplane. It doesn't matter. And you're telling them: "Okay, get in touch with me. Contact with me." Okay? This is the meaning. "Contact me when you arrive." Now, you will notice I circled the preposition "with" because if you want to talk about the person that you're going to get in touch with, you must use "with". And again, you can also use "with" with: "Keep in touch with me.", "Stay in touch with me.", "Be in touch with me." as well. Okay, let's look at two more with "get", and then we'll recap everything. So: "I tried to get in touch with her." I attempted to get in contact, but I wasn't successful. "I will get in touch with you later." So, I will contact you later. Okay? All right, so, review. "Keep in touch!", "Stay in touch!", "Be in touch!" they all mean to keep communication, to stay in contact, stay in communication with a person. "To get in touch" means to start the communication, to initiate the contact. And you can use, especially "Keep in touch" when you're saying good bye to a person that you're not sure if you will see them again for a long time. You could say: "Okay, yeah, keep in touch. Stay in touch. Be in touch." And, "To get in touch", you can, you know, use it as a command to tell a person to contact me. Okay? So, if you would like to test your understanding of this material, as always, you can check out the quiz on www.engvid.com. And don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel. Keep in touch.
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