Learn English with Emma [engVid]
Hi, my name is Emma, and I'm going to teach you English! Learning a different language can be hard, but it can also be a fun and rewarding experience. I am TESOL-certified and have taught students from various backgrounds, ages, and levels. From immigrants to international students, private lessons to classrooms, my experiences have been varied and have allowed me to gain insight into the challenges that ESL students face. Teaching is one of those great professions that allow you to be forever learning. While I teach students both French and English, they teach me about their cultures, their lives, and other ways to see the world. It is a privilege to teach and I am thankful for all of my students over the years who have shared their stories, interests, and dreams with me.

138 videos
Conversation Skills: Interrupting politely in English Conversation Skills: Interrupting politely in English
1 week ago En
It may be impolite to interrupt in your native culture and language, but it is common for native English speakers to interrupt each other during conversation. There are many reasons why we may interrupt someone. Learning how to do it politely will help you feel more confident in your conversational skills. In this lesson, I will talk about when it’s okay to interrupt someone and how to do it politely. You will learn some common expressions you can use, like “Sorry for interrupting, but...”; “Can I just mention something?”; and “Before you move on, I’d like to say something.” I will also teach you expressions you can use when someone interrupts you, for example, “Let me finish what I was saying”; and “I’m almost finished my point.” Lastly, we will look at non-verbal cues to show you would like a turn to say something. See how well you understood the lesson by taking the quiz! https://www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-interrupting-politely-in-english/
How to pronounce the ‘R’ sound in English: Tips & Practice How to pronounce the ‘R’ sound in English: Tips & Practice
1 month ago En
The R sound is one of the most difficult to pronounce in English. Many students find this sound very challenging to learn because it is so different from how it sounds in their native language. In this lesson, I will teach you about how to produce the R sound, and give you tips to make it easier. Together, we will practice listening for and pronouncing the R sound in a fun activity. Did you know that there are different ways to pronounce R? Maybe one way will be easier for you! Take a quiz on this lesson at https://www.engvid.com/how-to-pronounce-r-in-english/
8 AWAY Expressions in English: go away, run away, right away... 8 AWAY Expressions in English: go away, run away, right away...
2 months ago En
You may already know that “away” is an adjective that means something or someone is not there. But did you know that “away” often changes the meaning of another word in a sentence? Expressions with “away” are some of the most common in English. In this lesson, I will teach you eight of them. You will learn how to use “right away”, “take away”, “give away”, “fire away”, “go away”, “move away”, “run away”, and “turn away”. Some of these expressions have more than one meaning, so we will explore each one carefully. After the lesson, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/8-away-expressions-in-english/
How to succeed in your JOB INTERVIEW: Situational Questions How to succeed in your JOB INTERVIEW: Situational Questions
2 months ago En
Imagine you have a job interview in the near future. How would you prepare for it? Job interviews can be difficult whether you are an English learner or a fluent speaker. Learning about common interview question types can help you prepare and feel more confident for the big day. In many English-speaking countries, interviews often include situational questions. A situational question gives you an imaginary scenario and asks what you would do if it were real. In this video, I will teach you about situational interview questions and how to answer them. This video also has a listening practice that will help you recognize these questions and prepare for them. After watching this video, watch some of my other job interview and employment skill videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iRBcNs9oI8&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1uIoYaxVNntjU9kIjWYNlxO TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about job interview questions; specifically, we are going to talk about a type of job interview question called "a situational interview question". "Situational" is quite a large word, and you know, it's nothing to be afraid of, if you get this type of question. What we are going to learn today is how to recognize a situational interview question, and how to answer one. Okay? And I'm going to share a whole bunch of tips on the best ways to answer these types of questions. All right, so to get started, I've shown some examples of a situational interview type of question. So, let's read these together. The first question: "You hear someone making a racist joke in your office. What would you do?" "You disagree with the way your supervisor says to solve a problem. What would you do?" "You have been placed in charge of a team for a new project. What are your first steps to get the team going?" Okay? So, I want you to think about these questions, and: What do they have in common? Okay? If you said that these questions were talking about an imaginary situation or a hypothetical situation, you're correct. When we answer these types of questions, we're talking about something we would do if a situation happened. So, this is not based on our experiences; this is based on, you know, what we might do if this situation happened to us. Okay? So, again, there are many different types of interview questions; this is just one type that you might get. And these are just some examples; there are many more examples of situational interview questions. So, how do we know these questions are situational interview type questions? Well, there's a couple of keywords which can really help you recognize and identify these types of questions. If you hear the word: "If"; if you hear the word "would", these are really good hints. So, for example: "What would you do?" That's a... right there, we know: "Okay: 'What would you do?' it's a situational question." Again: "What would you do?" Another common clue or another way we can tell that a question is situational is they often start with the word: "You", because they want you to imagine yourself in this situation. So, for example: "You hear someone making a racist joke in the office." Or: "You have been placed in charge of a team for a new project." This hasn't actually happened to you yet, but this is something that might happen to you in the future at this job. So, the interviewer wants to know: "If this happened, what would you do?" Okay? Okay, so now what we're going to do is we're going to look at some more examples of situational interview questions, and we're going to do a practice listening activity to help you practice recognizing these types of questions. Okay, so now that you know a little bit more about situational interview questions, let's practice listening for them. Okay? So, what I'm going to do is I'm going to say some different types of interview questions, and I want you to decide: Are they situational or not? Are they situational or something else? Okay? So, I want you to take out a piece of paper and get your pen or pencil ready, and I want you to make a picture on your paper that looks like this. Okay? So you can write: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, a column for yes and a column for no. Okay? And when... so, you can pause the video, and then when you're ready, you can unpause it and we can begin. Okay. So, now that you have your piece of paper and your pencil ready, and you've put this on your paper, let's get started. I'm going to say a question, and if it's situational, I want you to put a checkmark under "Yes"; if it's not situational, I want you to put a checkmark under "No". Okay? And to help you with this, remember: Situational questions usually have keywords in them, like: "If", "would", or they might begin with a sentence that starts with "You". Okay? So, let's... let's practice. Question number one: "What would you do if you knew your boss was absolutely wrong about an important work-related issue?" […]
Stop saying I'M SORRY: More ways to apologize in English Stop saying I'M SORRY: More ways to apologize in English
3 months ago En
Have you ever made a mistake and regretted it? Want to learn other ways to say “I’m sorry” in English – for all kinds of situations? In this lesson, I will teach you formal and informal ways to apologize. I will also discuss ways to speak about mistakes, regrets, and forgiveness. You will learn common phrases and expressions, like “It’s my fault”, “I didn’t mean to”, “I shouldn’t have”, “How can I make it up to you?”, and more. We will also look at North American cultural practices when it comes to apologizing. Learning a language is about more than just learning vocabulary; you need to understand culture, too. In this video, you get both! Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/stop-saying-im-sorry/ TRANSCRIPT and ways we talk about regrets. Okay? So this video is really about when you've done something wrong and you have to say: "I'm sorry", and how to say: "I'm sorry", you know, to make the other person feel better. Okay, so let's get started. The first thing I wanted to talk about is reasons. What are some reasons why we say: "I'm sorry"? What are some reasons why we apologize? (Which is another word for "I'm sorry"). There are many reasons. I've come up with a very short list. The number of reasons for why we say: "I'm sorry" is enormous; it's very large. So, this is a small list, but I thought about: We often say: "I'm sorry" when we're late, so we've told our friend: "I'm going to be there at 1pm", and then we show up at 1:30. So, we say: "I'm sorry. I'm sorry I'm late." Sometimes we might accidentally break something. Maybe we break somebody's lamp, or maybe we spill something - we drop wine on their carpet, so we'd say: "I'm sorry". Sometimes, you know, maybe somebody's saying something bad about someone else, and that person finds out that, you know, the person has said something bad-we call that "gossip"-and so you might apologize if you've said something bad about somebody. You might say: "I'm sorry" if you said something rude or impolite. Maybe if you were not nice to somebody; you did something that was bad or that was wrong, or you made a mistake. Maybe you had tuna for lunch with a whole bunch of onions, and now your breath smells, and so when you come back to work, you might say: "Oh, I'm sorry. I had tuna for lunch." Okay? This is... I hear this one quite a lot. So maybe you ate something that has a very strong smell, and you're saying: "I'm sorry" for that. Sometimes we also say sorry to be polite. So, sometimes we didn't make a mistake; somebody else made a mistake; and to be polite, we still say: "I'm sorry". I know it's a little bit strange, but for example, if you go to a restaurant and you order chicken, and the waiter comes and he brings you beef, then you might say: "I'm sorry. This isn't what I ordered." Okay? So, there are many reasons why we say: "I'm sorry". So now let's look at some of the ways we say: "I'm sorry". Okay, so the word "apology", "apology" means the same thing as "sorry". Okay? When you give an apology, it means you're saying you're sorry. So, let's look at some ways to say sorry. Well, we have: "Sorry", which is pretty informal; if you made a mistake with your friends or just in general conversation, we often just say: "Oh, sorry". We might say: "I'm sorry for" and give the reason why we're sorry. "I'm sorry for breaking your iPad.", "I'm sorry for not calling you.", "I'm sorry for being late.", "I'm sorry for forgetting your birthday." Okay? "I'm sorry for not being there." What you'll notice is when we use the word "for" after "I'm sorry"-this means we're giving a reason-we usually have a verb and "ing" with it, so it's the verb in the "ing" form. Okay? So: "I'm sorry for breaking", so you'll notice "break" and then "ing". "I'm sorry for forgetting" - you'll notice "ing". And if we want to say something that we didn't do that we're sorry for, we just add the word "not". "I'm sorry for not calling.", "I'm sorry for not answering the phone.", "I'm sorry for not telling you about, you know, my problem." Okay? So, we can... if we want to talk about something we didn't do that we're sorry for, we use the word "not". So: "I'm sorry for" is something we use a lot, but if we wanted to be more formal... imagine you're at work and you make a mistake, and you're talking to your boss-okay?-you might want to use more formal English for when you're talking at work. You might say: "I apologize", which is similar to the word "apology". "Apologize", okay? So, it's four syllables: "apologize". "I apologize". You can say that. And if you want, just like "sorry", you can also add the word "for" and give a reason. "I apologize for breaking it.", "I apologize for missing the meeting.", "I apologize for being late every day." So, if you're going to apologize to your boss or, you know, you're in a formal situation, you can use the words "apologize". And then, again, it follows the same rule as "sorry for", where you just have the verb with "ing". […]
How to LEARN & REMEMBER English Words: My Top Tips How to LEARN & REMEMBER English Words: My Top Tips
4 months ago En
Have you ever forgotten a word in the middle of a sentence? Maybe you have even paused your conversation to look up a word in the dictionary or on an electronic translator. In this lesson, I will teach you the key areas that can help you to learn and REMEMBER English words. These include focusing on a word’s meaning, spelling, pronunciation, and grammar. Learn why each of these areas are important and learn how they help you to remember. The tips in this video are based on current brain and language learning research, so you can trust that they are effective. To see how well you understood this lesson, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/how-to-learn-remember-english-words/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about learning new words, and some tips and tricks that can really help you with this. Okay? So, English has one of the world's largest vocabularies, and every year there are more and more words that come into the English language. So, every year I learn new words, and every year I hope you learn new words, too. So, in this video I'm going to talk about how we can really learn all these new words well, and how we can get a really deep understanding of these words and really know what they mean. Okay? So, to get started, I've drawn a beautiful picture of a guy who kind of looks like Charlie Brown, and I have here HIS SKULL IS OPENED, and you can see at the top... I don't know if you realize what that is, but that's his brain. And the reason I've drawn this is because when we're learning new words, what we're really doing is we're taking new words and we're putting them into our brains, and we're storing them in different ways. Okay? So, what we want to do is we want to find the best way that makes our brain really happy when we're learning these words, because that will help us remember them better, and learn them better. So, I'm going to talk about maybe a word that I learned recently, and I want you to think about maybe the last word you learned. Okay? Because that'll help you in this video to think about a word that you have learned recently. The word I learned recently was "binge-watch", and I'll be talking about this word to give examples when we talk about how to help your brain learn new English words. So, there are four areas we're going to be talking about today. We're going to be talking about meaning and that's, like, you know, understanding a word. Understanding it, and knowing how to use it and when to use it. We're going to talk about spelling. A lot of people don't know this, but spelling is very important when you're learning new words, and I'll tell you why. We're going to talk about pronunciation, which is another key and another very important area of learning new words. And then the grammar of the words-okay?-which is also very important. Each of these areas-meaning, spelling, pronunciation, and grammar-each of these are ways your brain stores a new word. Okay? So that's why each of them is very important. Your brain, when you learn a new word, it stores it based on the meaning, on the spelling, on the pronunciation, and on the grammar, so that's why we're going to look at each of these areas today and think about them when we're learning a new word. So, let's get started with meaning. Okay, so the first thing we're going to talk about is a word's meaning. Okay? What does it mean? So this is, of course, very important when you're learning a new word because, you know, without knowing the meaning, how can you use the new word, right? So, I have here some questions that I like to ask myself when I'm learning new words, because it helps me to think about what's important about the word, and also it helps me to make more connections with the word, and that will help me remember the word more. Okay? So, first of all, I like to ask myself when I see a word maybe that I kind of know: "How well do I know this word? Do I know it really well? Do I use it all the time already? Have I never seen this word before? Maybe I've seen this word before, but I don't know what it means. Or maybe I kind of know what it means, but I'm not really comfortable with it." Okay? So I usually ask myself, if I see a word: "Have I seen it before? Can I guess what it means?" Okay? Do I understand the word? And this is different than: Can I use the word? Because when we're talking about understanding, we're talking about, you know, reading. When you look in a book and you see the word written, can you understand what it says? And we're also talking about listening. When you hear someone say it, do you know what they're saying? Do you understand the word when they're...? They're using it in a sentence? So, we have understand, which is about reading and listening, and then we have using it: Can I use the word? And this is: Can I use the word in conversation or when I talk? Can I use the word in writing? […]
SMALL TALK: What to say and what NOT to say! SMALL TALK: What to say and what NOT to say!
5 months ago En
What is “small talk”? Small talk is a type of conversation we make when we are talking to people we don’t know well. It’s one of the most important speaking skills to develop when you learn English. In this lesson, I will teach you what you should and shouldn’t talk about with people you don’t know well in North America. The topics that are appropriate for small talk are different in different cultures, so these might be different from what you’re used to, depending on where you are from. We will also talk about how to politely leave a conversation. Small talk can help you connect with new people, make friends, network, and it can also help you feel more comfortable in a conversation. Test your small talk skills with the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/small-talk/ WATCH THESE VIDEOS NEXT: 1. Have better conversations using the FORD method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glBGzRw1rWw&index=24&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY 2. English Conversation – The Meaning of Hand Gestures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xY_xiGadcgk&index=52&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about something very, very important in English, and that is small talk. Okay? So, I'm first going to talk about: What is small talk? And then I'm going to talk about the good things to do in order to make good small talk, and the don'ts - the things we don't do when we're making small talk. Okay, so first of all, what is "small talk"? Very good question. So, I've written some question words up here: "What?", "Who?", "Where/When?", "Why?", and "How?" So, what is "small talk"? "Small talk" is a type of conversation. It's conversation we make with people we don't know that well. Okay? So, it's conversation we make when we don't really know people that well. We use small talk not with our family, not with our friends; we use small talk with strangers - with people we don't know. We use it with acquaintances. And for those of you who don't know, "acquaintance" is somebody you know, but not really well. So, for example, your neighbour might be an acquaintance. Your friend's friend might be an acquaintance. So, with strangers, with acquaintances, people you know their name but you don't really know them well. With your co-workers, with your boss, with your neighbours, with the clerk at the store maybe - if you like to go to a cafe, you might use it with the person who works at the cafe. So, small talk is for people you don't know that well. So, where and when? We've already talked of a couple of examples. Have you ever been on an elevator, and everybody's look at their phone; nobody's making eye contact? A lot of people will make small talk on elevators. At parties. We use small talk at parties. We use them when we're in line ups; sometimes we talk to people near us. We use them at conferences when we're in business or academics. We use them in our classes. When you have a classmate, you don't know them that well, you would probably use small talk. And there are many, many other situations you use small talk. So, why do we use small talk? Well, number one, we want to be friendly. Okay? When we meet somebody, we don't want to seem rude, we don't want to seem unfriendly; we want to seem friendly, so we use small talk. We use small talk to meet new people. A lot of students, when they come to other countries, they want to meet new people. A good way to do that is by using small talk. We want to not feel uncomfortable. Okay? We want to feel comfortable; not uncomfortable. If, for example, you're in an elevator and nobody's talking, it makes everybody feel a little bit uncomfortable. Small talk could make that situation feel more comfortable. We also use small talk to make other people feel comfortable. Okay? We're trying to make a connection with other people and make them feel comfortable, too. All right? So, key point: Small talk we use for people we don't know that well; we use it for strangers, acquaintances, neighbours. Do we use it for family and friends? Not really. We use it for many different types of situations, and we use it for multiple reasons. So now I'm going to teach you some great ways to make small talk. Okay, so remember small talk is for everybody. So, we want to keep the conversation easy, and things everybody can talk about. Okay? So, what are some things that would make great small talk? Well, first of all, I want you to imagine you're at a party and you don't know anyone, and you want to talk to somebody. Here are some great things you could say. So, to start, you can talk about the place you're in or the venue. Okay? So, for example, if music is playing, you can just say to someone: "Oh, I love this song", and that can start a conversation. Or maybe you can say: "What a great apartment this is" or "Isn't that such a beautiful painting? You know, it's such a nice painting." […]
How to use SO & NEITHER in English: "So do I", "Neither am I"... How to use SO & NEITHER in English: "So do I", "Neither am I"...
6 months ago En
I will teach you how to use “so” and “neither” to show you agree with or have had the same experience as someone. For example, if your friend says, “I like pizza”, you can answer, “So do I” to agree with them. If your friend says, “I can’t whistle”, you can answer, “Neither can he” to refer to someone else. As you can see, “so” and “neither” can be used with different verbs and different subjects. Watch the video to learn the grammar behind this concept and get many examples. After watching, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-so-neither/ to practice what you have learned. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you about something we use a lot in conversation, and that is the words: "So" and "Neither". So, how do we use these in conversation? Well, I want you to think about a conversation you've recently had with somebody. A lot of the times when we talk to people, we want to contribute something to the conversation and we want to show that we agree with someone. Okay? So, for example, maybe I'm talking about pizza. "I like pizza." If you want to tell me that you agree with me, you can use the word: "So do I." Okay? So, you can use this expression; it starts with "So", then we have a verb, a helping verb, and then we have the person; in this case, it's "I". Okay, so: "So do I." Let me ask you another question. Well, not a question. Let me say something that I believe. "I really like music." Do you like music, too? If you do, when I say: "I like music", you can say: "So do I" because you agree with me; you like music, too. Okay? Now... So, that's when we use "So", and we'll have a lot more examples in a moment. Let's just talk a little bit about "Neither" for a moment. We use "Neither" when we're talking about something negative, so something that has the word "not" in it or... You know, for example: "I do not like pizza. I don't like pizza." If I say something like this in a conversation, you can agree with me, and you can say: "Neither do I". "I don't like pizza." You say: "Neither do I", if you agree with me. So, let's do some examples together. "I speak English." If you wanted to add to the conversation and show you agree and you have the same experience, you can say: "So", then we can add: "do", and then you can say: "I". Okay, let me think about something else. "I don't speak Klingon." This is a language from Star Trek. "I don't speak Klingon." If you wanted to add to this conversation, you can say-so, we have here it's a negative; it has the word "not"-"Neither do I." So, we use "So" and "Neither" when we want to show agreement with what somebody's saying in a conversation. So, let's look at some more examples of that. So, so far we've talked about: "So do I" and "Neither do I". Okay? To show agreement with what somebody's saying. What about if we want to talk about somebody else? Well, we have "So" here, but we can actually change the pronoun we use when we're talking about someone else. So, if you're talking to somebody, you can say: "So do you." Or maybe, you know, I say: "I love traveling." And maybe you have a sister who loves traveling, you can say about your sister: "So does she." Okay? We can also do, if there's you and somebody else, you can use the pronoun "we"; or if you're talking about a group of other people, you can use the pronoun "they". So, before I had "I", but you can actually use any of these or you can use somebody's name. For example: Drake. Okay? So: "I live in Toronto. So does Drake." We both live in Toronto. I never see Drake, but we both live in Toronto, so I can say: "I live in Toronto, and so does Drake." Now, did you notice I did something different with the verb? Okay? The verb has to be in agreement with the pronoun. So, when we use "you", this goes into "do": "I do", "you do". For "he" and "she", the verb, in this case we call this a helping verb - the helping verb goes into "does": "she does", "he does", so we invert it. "So does he.", "So does she.", "So do we.", "So do they." Drake is "he", so we would put: "So does Drake." The point is: It needs to match. The pronoun and the verb need to match. Okay? What about "Neither"? Well, it's the same. Okay? "I don't live in Australia. Neither does Drake.", "neither do you", "neither does he", "neither does she", "neither do we", "neither do they". Okay? So, it's important that the verb matches the pronoun. But notice that "So" and "Neither" are at the very beginning of the sentence. So, they always have the same place. Okay, so let's look at some other examples of ways we can use "So" and "Neither" in conversation. […]
English Pronunciation Practice: CONSONANT CLUSTERS English Pronunciation Practice: CONSONANT CLUSTERS
7 months ago En
Do you have trouble pronouncing ‘s’ words in English? Many students find words like street, squirrel, screen, spell, snow, and others difficult to pronounce. That’s because these words have consonant clusters in them. Consonant clusters are two or more consonants next to each other in a word. In this video, we will focus on ‘s’ words that contain consonant clusters, like the “str” in “street” or the “sk” in “sky”. In English, consonant clusters are very common. There may not be any in your native language, which could make their pronunciation challenging for you. But by the end of this video, you will have a solid grasp of the concept of consonant clusters and their pronunciation. Test your understanding with the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-pronunciation-practice-consonant-clusters/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about pronunciation. Today we are going to talk about something called: "Consonant Clusters". Okay? So, you're probably thinking: "What is a 'consonant cluster' or a 'consonant blend'?" That's okay, because in this video I will talk about what these are-they're very common in English-I'm going to talk about mistakes people make when pronuncing-... Pronouncing them. Sorry. And then I'm going to teach you a great way to practice these words. Okay? So, let's first learn about: What are "consonant clusters"? Okay, so I have here the word: "snow", "small", "sleep", and "sport". These have something in common. If you're not quite sure, but you're thinking maybe it has to do with consonant clusters, you're correct. Okay? Just like the name of this video, these four words all have consonant clusters in them. Okay? And I've underlined the part that is the consonant cluster. So, here we have: "sn", "sm", "sl", "sp". So, to better understand consonant clusters, first we should really talk about vowels and consonants. So, vowels, in English, are sounds that contain either: "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and sometimes "y". So these are our vowels in English. In different languages, vowels are different; in English, these are our vowels. So, we have here: "o" in "snow" is a vowel, the "a" sound in "small", the "ah" is a vowel, we have the "e" sound in "sleep" is a vowel, and the "o" sound in "sport" is a vowel. So, these are our vowels. The opposite of a vowel is a consonant. So, consonants are not vowels; they're pretty much everything else. Okay? So, in English, we have a lot of consonants. "t" is an example of a consonant, "r", "s", "k", "c", "m", "n", "b", "v", "q", "p", "l", and there's so many more. Okay? So, pretty much every other sound that is not these are consonants. So, now we've... So, in this word, for example: "s" is a consonant, "n" is a consonant. In this word: "s" is a consonant, "m" is a consonant, and "l" is a consonant. Okay? And here we have the same; "s", "l", and "p" are consonants; "s", "p", and "r" and "t" are consonants. Okay? Okay, so we've talked about vowels and we've talked about consonants. So now let's talk about consonant clusters. So, consonant clusters are where you have two or more consonants together in your pronunciation, and they... They make, like, one unit of sound. So, for example, we have here "s", which is a consonant, and "t" which is a consonant. So, when these two are together in the beginning or the end of a word, it's a consonant cluster. So, we pronounce this, for example: "stair". So, the "st" is a consonant cluster. Or it can come at the end of a word, like: "last". And a lot of students have trouble with consonant clusters, because they're... They're hard. You're... You're pronouncing a lot of different sounds together. Here's another example of a consonant cluster. So, we have "f" which is a consonant, and we have "r" which is a consonant; together, they're a consonant cluster. We might find this in the word "friend", or maybe a word like "free". Here we have "s" and "q". We'll get back to "r" in a second. We have "s" and "q" together. So, if you think about this: "squirrel". So, "s" and "q" together. I'm just going to remove that. "Squirrel". We have another consonant cluster, because "s" is a consonant and so is "q"; "q" is a consonant as well. And then, finally, another example, we have the "g" sound and we have the "r" sound. Together, for example, in the beginning of "green", these two are both consonants, so they form a consonant cluster. So, I think you're sort of getting the idea. There's a lot of consonant clusters in English, and these are hard to pronounce. So, today we're going to focus on consonant clusters that start with the letter "s" or that are in "s" words. Okay? So let's look at what I mean by this. You might see a word with "sm" in it, so for example: "small" - that's a consonant cluster with "s". You might see "sn", like "snake"; "sw", like "sword"; "st", like... Well, I was going to say "street"; that's more, like, here: "str" is "street". […]
How to use sequencers in English: FIRST, THEN, NEXT, AFTER THAT, FINALLY How to use sequencers in English: FIRST, THEN, NEXT, AFTER THAT, FINALLY
7 months ago En
Sequencers are words that organize your writing and speaking, words like “first”, “next”, “then”, “after that”, and “finally”. We often use sequencers in English when we give instructions, describe a process, or tell stories. Using sequencers is a simple trick that improves your writing and speaking because it organizes your ideas into sections and gives them an order. Watch the video and you will see how sequencers can help others understand you more clearly. Next, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-sequencing-first-next-finally/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about sequencers. So, "sequencers" are words like: "First", "Next", "Then", "After that", and "Finally". We use sequencers when we are talking about steps or the order of doing things. So, we will use sequencers when we tell stories. We use sequencers when we give instructions, such as how to do something. Okay? Because when we tell someone how to do something, we're giving them a lot of different steps, and so sequencers help us organize these steps. Okay, so let's get started and let's see some examples of how we use sequencers. So, I have here my five steps: "First", "Next", "Then", "After that", and "Finally". These are the sequencers we're focusing on in today's lesson. So, I want you to imagine you want to tell somebody how to make a hamburger. Okay? When you make a hamburger, there are different steps to making a hamburger. "First, you take a bun. Next, you put lettuce on the bun. Then you add a hamburger or the meat. After that, maybe you put ketchup or mustard. And finally, you put on the top bun and you eat it." So, these are the five steps in making a hamburger. That's just an example of how we would use this type of language. Okay? So, when we're using sequencers, "First" always comes first. Okay? So, notice "First" is number one. So, when we're giving instructions or we're giving steps, this is how we would start. When we're ending our instructions or at the end of what we're saying, when we're giving a how-to or telling somebody how to do something, we can end with this word: "Finally". So, "First" is the first thing you say, "Finally" is the last, and then we have these three: "Next", "Then", and "After that". They all mean the same thing, so you can use "Then" as your second step; you can use "After that" as your final step; you can use these interchangeably. So, it doesn't matter the order of these three. "First", "Then", "Next", "After that", "Finally" - we can use sequencers in that way, too. So, let's think of some more examples. I want you to use these in your own life, or think about ways you can use these in your own life. I want you to think about when you woke up this morning. What were five things you did? And think about the order you did them in. So, maybe: First, you heard your alarm clock. Okay? So, first, you woke up and you heard your alarm clock. What's the second thing that happened? Well, maybe if you're like me: Next, I had a shower. I took a shower. Okay. After that, I ate breakfast. Then I brushed my teeth. And finally... Oo, what did I do "finally" this morning? I think I went for a walk. Okay? So, those were the five things I did this morning in the order I did them. So, I want you to try: Think about the five things you did this morning. And you can say them out loud to practice. Okay? So: First, you... Next... Then... After that... And: Finally... So let's look at another example of how we can use these sequencers. So, one of my favourite things in life is drinking tea; I love tea. So, I am going to use sequencers to teach you how to make a cup of tea. So, first thing I want to use is the word "First". The first thing you do is first: You boil the water. Okay? So, you boil water; you make it very hot. Then you add tea to your cup. Okay? Maybe you have a tea bag. Next, you add the hot water to the cup. After that, add milk and sugar. Finally, you stir it and you drink it. Okay? So, these are steps in making a cup of tea. Now, if I wanted to, I could go and make more steps. Okay? And I can use some of these multiple times. So, maybe I can use "Then" to talk about: Then you let the tea steep or you let the tea... You... I don't know. Then you add honey. So, there are other steps you might add. And you can use some of these sequencers multiple times. Again, the main thing is: Use "First" for the first step, and "Finally" for the last step. Let's look at one more example of using sequencers when we're talking about how to do something. Okay, so let me tell you about a true story. I have a friend named Lucy, and she is beautiful, smart, funny; she's a wonderful woman, and right now she's looking for a boyfriend. So, she asked me for advice: Emma, how can I find the man of my dreams? […]
Practice the PRESENT PERFECT TENSE in English! Practice the PRESENT PERFECT TENSE in English!
8 months ago En
Did you know that it is possible to have fun while learning grammar? In this lesson, I will teach you my favorite game for practicing the present perfect tense in English. You will learn how to use it to talk about past experiences. For example, when using the verb “to drink” in the present perfect, do we say, “Have you ever drank?” or “Have you ever drunk?” Watch the video to find out. You will also hear many more examples in conversation with a surprise guest. That’s right! There will be a surprise guest who will also help you to learn and remember the present perfect tense. Test your understanding with the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/practice-the-present-perfect-tense-in-english/ NEXT, watch one of my other grammar lessons: 1. Take the Present Perfect Progressive Challenge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kxh5mCr93eY&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=17 2. Learn English Tenses – 4 ways to talk about the future: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-6ZBRkZKWI&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=58 TRANSCRIPT Emma: Hello. My name is Emma, and we have a very special video for you today. Okay? In today's video you're going to learn a little bit of grammar about the present perfect, and then you are going to play a really fun game. Not only are you going to get to play a fun game, you're also going to get to meet my sister. Yes, Emma has a sister, so you'll get to see my sister a little bit later because she is going to play the game with us as well. So, let's get started and let me teach you this grammar point, so then we can get to the fun stuff. Okay? So, today we're going to talk about the present perfect. The present perfect is a bit of grammar. Okay? It's a type of tense that many students get very frustrated with. They don't know: "Do I use the present perfect? Do I use the past tense?" It can be really difficult. So, when do we use the present perfect, and what is the present perfect? Well, let me first give you an example of a present perfect sentence, because maybe you've seen something like this before. "Have you ever been to France?", "Have you ever lived in a different city?", "Has your sister ever been on TV?" These are three examples of the present perfect. So, when do we use the present perfect? Well, there's different times we use the present perfect in English. In today's lesson, we're going to focus on using the present perfect to talk about a past experience. So, this is something interesting. An experience is usually an interesting experience; although it doesn't have to be. So, it's an experience that has happened in the past. So, it's not happening now, it's not happening in the future; it's already happened. It happened before, in the past. That's why a lot of students have a hard time with the present perfect because they see the word "present", and they get confused. "But how can we be talking about the past?" Well, the present perfect can be used to talk about a past experience, and we use it to talk about a past experience when we're just talking about something that happened, but we're not talking about when it happened. We're not talking about a specific time; we're not talking about a date. We're talking generally about an experience that happened in the past. So, I wanted to focus on present perfect questions to ask people about their experiences, because a lot of conversations start this way or have this in them. So, when we ask a person a question about the past experience, we can ask them: "Have you ever...?" This indicates we want to know something about somebody's past. "Have you ever been to France?" for example. So I'm asking you: "In the past, have you been to France?" So, to create the present perfect, let's talk about form now. We have: "Have you ever" and then we add something called a past participle to make it the present perfect. So, what's a past participle? Well, a "past participle" is a form of the verb. So, for example, in this case we have the verb "be", "to be". The past participle form of the verb "to be" is "been". Okay? In this case, we have: "Have you ever" and we have our past participle. What's a past participle again? It's a verb in a specific form. Okay? So it's a specific form of a verb. In this case, "lived" is the past participle of "live" or "to live". And our last example. Oh, we have "been" again, which I've already discussed. So, we use past participles in the present perfect. Now, this is where it gets a little bit challenging. There are two different types of past participles; we have our regular past participles and our irregular past participles. So, what's a "regular past participle"? Well, this is a verb where we just add "ed". Okay? So, for example: "play" becomes "played", and I add "ed", and that makes it a past participle. Another example is just down here: "lived". "Live", we add "ed" and it becomes "lived", and that's an example of a regular past participle. Okay? So, have you ever...? […]
How to learn MORE English with Emma How to learn MORE English with Emma
9 months ago En
http://www.TeacherEmma.com Are you looking for more ways to learn English? In this video, I will talk about an exciting new opportunity. You will learn how you can get more English resources made by me. I will talk about my new website, http://www.teacheremma.com, and what I am currently offering to people. After watching the video, check out my website to learn more. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I want to tell you about a very exciting opportunity; but before I talk about this really great opportunity, I wanted to tell you a little bit about myself and what I do. So, I hope you see this heart, here. I put this heart here because I want to talk something that's very close, and near and dear to my heart, and that is teaching English. I believe English learning or learning the English language can help people change their lives for the better. Okay? A lot of you are learning English, and I want to ask you: Why are you learning English? Maybe some of you want a promotion at work, maybe some of you are looking for a new job or the love of your life, maybe some of you want to travel and see the world and you know English is going to help that goal; for others it might be about studying at a different university abroad; or maybe for those of you who work in business, maybe English can help you conduct your business better. Whatever the reason, there are many, many reasons why somebody might learn English, and I'm here to help you with your goal. So, my job is to help you meet your goals-whatever they are-by providing free English lessons. I have been doing this for a very long time. Since 2011, I have been creating YouTube videos about all sorts of things related to English; from listening, to grammar, to vocabulary, to test preparation. I create a lot of videos about English-language learning. But what a lot of people don't realize is that these videos take a lot of time and effort to create, so I wanted to talk a little bit about that. What goes into creating one of our videos? Well, first of all, our videos require a team. You see me in front of the camera, but we have people working behind the camera who I'd like to thank; we have people who film, people who edit, who produce, we have people who create the closed captioning at the bottom of the videos to help our learners understand them better. So, we are a team who create these videos. The second thing I wanted to say is that these videos take a lot of time and effort, and we're very happy to create these videos because they are very important to a lot of people; and we believe in free, accessible education. So, let me tell you a little bit more about myself and why I do what I do. So, I have spent years learning on how to teach and what goes into learning a language. I have gone to different conferences, I have taken many courses and certifications, as well as recently I obtained a master's related to language learning. Another thing that a lot of people might not know about me is I still work full time. So, during the day I work and I teach; and it's in the evenings and on weekends when I do my passion. Well, my passion is teaching, but I mean my passion at work of creating these free videos. So, some of you might wonder: Why do you spend your evenings and weekends creating these videos? Well, to me they're very important for the following reasons. I like to help to create these free videos because I think they really help people. I've met a lot of different people who have watched my videos, and I'm always glad to help. I think that English can help people reach their goals, and I want to be a part of this and I want to help people reach their goals, so this is one reason why I do this. I also very much believe in accessible education. To me, I like the idea of a fair world; I like the idea of free education where it doesn't matter how much money you have, and it doesn't matter where you live, or even what... If you have a disability or not. I like the idea of everybody having access to education. So, one reason I create these videos is to make the world more accessible and to provide free education for all. I also think it's important that when you know something, you should share it when it comes to new research, or new information, and new knowledge. I've spent a lot of time learning about the best ways to learn a language, so I like sharing this with others. Finally, I love sharing my culture. I'm a very proud Canadian and a very proud Torontonian, which is somebody from Toronto. So, in these videos I get to talk a lot about my city and my country, and I get to share aspects of my culture, and I also love learning about other people's cultures, so doing this really helps me to do that. […]
How to talk about your job in English: 10 Key Verbs How to talk about your job in English: 10 Key Verbs
9 months ago En
I will teach you ten common English verbs to talk about jobs and the workplace. You will learn the meaning, spelling, pronunciation, and grammar of the following words: hire, earn, pay, fire, quit, lay off, resign, retire, promote, and demote. You will also see examples of how these words are used. One of the most common topics of conversation is work. Whether you love or hate your job, you probably talk about it frequently, so you need to learn how to use these words. After watching the video, take my quiz to practice the new words you have learned, at https://www.engvid.com/how-to-talk-about-your-job-in-english-10-key-verbs/ NEXT, watch the rest of the videos in my JOB SKILL series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iRBcNs9oI8&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1uIoYaxVNntjU9kIjWYNlxO TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today’s video, we are going to teach you 10 verbs that you can use when you’re talking about work and jobs—okay?—and careers. So these are 10 very important verbs that you will hear a lot in movies, and on TV shows, and maybe even your professional life. Okay? So, let’s get started. So, for each of these verbs, I’m going to tell you what they mean; I’m going to tell you the grammar of the verb, because that’s also very important; and I am going to talk about pronunciation, so: “How do we say it?”; and spelling. Each of these parts, so meaning, grammar, pronunciation, and smell… Spelling; not smelling. Spelling can really help you remember these verbs better. Okay? So, my first verb: “to be hired”. What does it mean: “to be hired”? Well, this is a very good meaning; this is something very exciting. When you are hired, it means you get a job. Okay? So, it’s: You’ve given your resume to a company, you’ve done the interview, and guess what? You are hired. Okay? That means: “You’ve gotten the job! Well done.” So, I’ve drawn a smiley face here, because this is very exciting. So, let’s look at an example of the verb “hired”. A long time ago, when I was a lot younger: “I was hired by Blockbuster.” Okay? So, a company, I don’t know if it still exists, but: “I was hired by Blockbuster.” Okay? So you’ll notice something about this verb. We have here the subject, which is “I” – “Emma”, and we have the verb “hired”, but you might also notice this word “was”. “I was hired”. This means that this verb is in what’s called the passive tense. Okay? So, when we’re talking about maybe our friends or our family, or people we know who got a job, we will say: “My friend was hired by”, and the company. Or, you know: “I was hired by this company.” Okay? Now, this is a bit different. So this is in the passive and it’s very important to remember the word “was”. We have here our… Our same verb: “hired”, but in this case it’s in the active tense. And if you don’t know what I mean by passive or active, that’s okay, because we have a video on that which will help explain that; but the point here is that: Usually when you use “hired”, you usually have a “was” in front of it or a “were”, depending on if you’re saying: “he”, “she”, “we”, “they”. We usually have it like this. If you’re talking about a company or the boss of a company—a manager—and we’re talking about their role and that they want to employ someone, in this case we would use the active, which is this sentence: “The manager hired John.” Okay? And so you’ll notice here… I could also say: “Blockbuster hired me.” You know, if I was a famous actress, I could say: “Universal Studios hired me for their next movie.” Not true, but just an example. So, the key here is there’s no “was” or “were” in the active form. But for you, you will probably be mainly using the first form – the passive form. Okay? And if you have questions about this, you can watch our videos on passive and active tenses. So: “I was hired by Blockbuster.” How do I pronounce this word? Well, the first thing is: It is two syllables. So, we say: “hi-er”. Okay? So I want you to repeat after me: “hi-er”. Okay. And so it’s kind of like the word: “hi”, “er”. And in terms of the spelling… One of the great things with verbs that have to do with jobs is a lot of them are spelt very similarly; they have very close spellings. So, for example, we have here: “hire”. There’s another job verb that we’ll be talking about soon that does not mean the same thing, but it also has “ire”. Can you guess what that word is? “Fire”. Okay? “Fire” rhymes with “hire”; they both have similar spelling… Spellings. And we also have another word: “retire”. Okay? So, “i-r-e” you’ll see are very common with job verbs. All right, so let’s look at another verb: “to earn”. Okay? This is a great verb: “to earn”. It means to make money. Okay? So you’ve gotten the job, you have been hired, so what happens now? The best part: You start to make money. You earn money. Okay? So, I’ve drawn a happy face here because this is also a very good thing about jobs. […]
Improve Your English Pronunciation: How the Human Voice Works Improve Your English Pronunciation: How the Human Voice Works
10 months ago En
Want to improve your pronunciation and vocabulary at the same time? Learning the structure of your face, your mouth, and your neck will help you learn to pronounce the sounds of English. In this lesson, I will teach you the names of many body parts related to speech and pronunciation, such as the voice box, Adam’s apple, roof of the mouth, upper and lower lip, and more. I will give examples of how we use these body parts to produce different sounds. You will learn about the sounds produced by the roof of your mouth, as well as how we use the Adam’s apple or larynx to pronounce consonants like ‘k’ and ‘g’. NEXT: watch other important pronunciation videos: 1. How to pronounce "OF" like a native English speaker: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kb2tjo3FNkk 2. Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 BACK VOWELS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UKNO_-m7so TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to help you with your pronunciation. So, in this video, I am going to teach you the first step to learning how to pronounce different English sounds. We have many different sounds of English, and by knowing about the different body parts we use when we pronounce these sounds, it can really improve your pronunciation. Okay? So, let's get started. The first thing I want to do is I want to teach you some of the different body parts we use when we pronounce English sounds. So, I have here a face. I hope it's not a scary face. I'm not the best artist, as some of you might know, but this is my art. And so, in this face, we have the eyes, the nose, the lips, the teeth, and the tongue. So, let's look at each of these parts that we actually use when we pronounce different words. This is... I know it looks kind of like a silly nose, but this is a nose. So, this is this part of your body. Okay? A lot of people are surprised to find out we actually use our nose when we pronounce some sounds in English. We use our nose when we pronounce the "m" sound, so: "ma". Okay? And you can actually feel your nose vibrate. "Ma". The "n" sound, so like "no" you actually use your nose. And the "ing" sound, so anytime you hear, like "ing" words, like: "swimming", you use your nose as well. The other parts of the body we use for different sounds is we often use our lips. Okay? So for our top lip is the top part, so this is the top lip. Okay? It's the lip that's more up. So, the upper lip is also the top lip; here it is. And we also have the bottom lip, which is at the bottom of your face. Okay? So top lip and bottom lip. So, you can also call the bottom lip your lower lip. Okay? It's another word that means the same thing. So, for your lower lip, we often use your lower lip when we're pronouncing sounds like the "f" sound, so for example: "fan", you'll notice my teeth touch my lower lip. "Fan". And the "v" sound, so for example: "van". Okay? So, it's important to know what parts of your body you're using, and a mirror can really help with this. We also use our teeth. Okay? So, these are our teeth. We use our teeth when we pronounce things. So, for example, the "th" sound in English is a sound many people have trouble with, and so if you say: "Thank you", you'll notice my tongue touches my teeth. "Thank you", so I'm using my teeth to pronounce the sound. We use... Sometimes we use both our lips when we pronounce sounds, so for example, we will use our top lip and our lower lip together. So, when we make a "b" sound, we use our lips. "Ba". Or when we use a "p" sound: "pa". When we use the "sh" sound, like in "shoe", you notice my lips are circled. "Shoe", we're using both lips. The "ch" sound, like: "choose". And the "w" sound, like: "wonderful". So, sometimes when we're using our top and lower lip, our lips might be in a circle. So, for example, with the "o" sound. So: "whoa", you notice my lips are in a circle, like this. Other times when we use our lips, our lips might retract or they might spread out, so for example, like this. You might get: "e". Okay? Notice my lips? They're pulled apart. "E". So, a lot of your face is used when pronouncing sounds. Now we're going to learn about what types of body parts we have inside our mouth that also help us to make different sounds. Okay, so I've made another very scary picture for you. I hope you like my art; it's an Emma original. So, this, can you guess what this is? If you said it's the eye, the nose, the lips, the teeth, and the tongue - you're right. This is the inside of somebody's face-okay?-from the side. So, if you're looking in a mirror and you're looking at the side, and you could see through your skin, you might see something like this. Probably not like this, because this is a bad drawing, but you get the point. So, what are some of the parts of our body we use when we're thinking about the inside of our mouth when we pronounce English sounds? Well, first of all, this is your nose. Okay? […]
Conversation Skills: A quick & easy way to make people understand you Conversation Skills: A quick & easy way to make people understand you
11 months ago En
“I’m sorry. I don’t understand.” Does this sound familiar? It is frustrating when people don’t understand you. In this video, you will learn an easy and quick tip that can improve your conversation skills even if you have a very strong accent or you are having trouble communicating with others. I will teach you how to introduce the topic of the conversation, also called the main idea. By just following this simple advice, people will understand more of what you say! After the lesson, test yourself with the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-make-people-understand-you/ Next, watch my lesson on how we use hand gestures in conversation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xY_xiGadcgk&index=50&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY TRANSCRIPT Coming soon!
Get a new job: Vocabulary & grammar for your RESUME & COVER LETTER Get a new job: Vocabulary & grammar for your RESUME & COVER LETTER
11 months ago En
Many people don't get a job because there are mistakes in their resume and cover letter. Don't let this happen to you. In this video, I will talk about the grammar and vocabulary expectations for resumes and cover letters. You will learn some important tips for your resume and cover letter, such as words you should use or avoid. If you follow my advice, you are much more likely to make a good impression on your future employer. Test your understanding by taking the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-grammar-resume-cover-letter/ Download this POWER VERB resource: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/power-verbs-in-english/ If you're looking for a new job, make sure to watch my other videos about job interviews and resumes: 1. COVER LETTER & RESUME TIPS & ADVICE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDMJVrVY3ME&index=6&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY 2. JOB INTERVIEW SUCCESS – BEHAVIORAL QUESTIONS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aO6cGTcnUg&index=12&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY 3. POWER VERBS FOR YOUR RESUME: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVAIXGhwYt8&index=24&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to talk about resumes and cover letters, and the vocabulary and grammar you can use on both. Okay? So in this video I am going to talk to you about some things that you should do for your cover letter and resume-some verbs you should use, some grammar that's really good to use, and, you know, some vocabulary-and I'm also going to talk about things you shouldn't do on your cover letter or resume. Okay? So this video is mainly about grammar and vocabulary. So let's get started. So, first of all, when you're writing a cover letter and/or a resume, you want to be very professional. So this means that you want to make sure that, you know, you're presenting yourself in a very professional way. Your writing should be formal, instead of informal. So, what do I mean by that? Well, for example, in your cover letter or resume, you should not use contractions. Contractions are words, like: "I'm", "I'll", "can't", "don't". Okay? These are all examples of contractions, and they should not be used in a cover letter or resume. You should also not use slang in a cover letter or resume; words, like: "cool", "screw up", "killed". There's a whole bunch of different slang words that you should avoid when you're writing a cover letter or resume. Another thing you should try to avoid - words, like: "really", "very", "totally". Okay? So if you want to say that you're really hardworking or you're, you know... You're totally right for this position - these words will make you sound unprofessional. Okay? So you do not want to use words, like: "very", "really", or "totally". They're great in conversation, but when you're writing something like a resume or cover letter, they're not good words to use. Okay. You should not use idioms. Okay? So, idioms are expressions that we use a lot in conversation. So, for example, you might say: "Oh, I passed my test with flying colours", which means you did really well, or, you know: "My old job was a piece of cake", meaning it was very easy. Idioms are great in conversation, but they are not good in cover letters or resumes. Okay? They're not professional, so do not use idioms in your resume or cover letter. You also want to be very polite in your resume or cover letter. So, expressions like... Or, you know, saying: "I want", "I want this job because" is not really polite. "I want" is a very strong... It's very strong, so it's better to use a more polite form of that, such as: "I would appreciate" or "I would like". These have pretty much the same meanings, but this is very strong, so we don't use it on a resume or a cover letter; whereas these are more polite so they're better to use in a cover letter. So this was a little bit about how to make your resume or the language in your resume and cover letter more professional; now we're going to learn more about great vocabulary to use and great grammar to use. Okay, so let's talk about vocabulary on your resume and cover letter. Vocabulary is very important. It can make you look very smart, very professional, and also very confident. Okay? So the words you choose can really help you in this way. So it's important to really think about what words you want to use. So, one thing to think about is if you've found a job advertisement and you've seen the job description, and it's a job you want to apply for, they often will have keywords in the advertisement. They might say that they are looking for somebody who is hardworking, or maybe somebody who knows Microsoft Office, or is a strong communicator. Whatever they say in the job description, it's a good idea to take that same vocabulary and use it in your resume and cover letter […]
English Grammar: Comparative Adjectives English Grammar: Comparative Adjectives
2 years ago En
Comparative adjectives are words that are used to show the differences between two nouns: “larger”, “smaller”, “longer”, etc. Some comparative adjectives have unexpected spellings, but there are some simple rules to follow to get the spellings right. In this lesson, I will use strange objects from my personal collection to teach you about comparative adjectives. For example, is my first sword “biger”, “bigger”, or “more big” than my second sword? I will teach you when to use “er” and when to use “more” to express comparisons between adjectives. You will also learn how the spelling changes on some words when we add the “er” ending. After watching this video, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-comparative-adjectives/ for more practice. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about comparative adjectives. So, what are comparative adjectives? They are words we use when we are comparing different things or different people. Okay? So, let's look a little bit more into this. I just wanted to remind you about what a noun is and an adjective is before we begin. A noun is a person, a place, or a thing. So, for example, this marker is a noun because it's a thing. I'm a person, my name is Emma - I'm also a noun. Okay? Right now we are in a classroom - a classroom is a place, so "classroom" is a noun. So, a noun is a person, a place, or a thing. An adjective is something... Or I should say it's a word that describes a noun. Okay? So, I said before this is a marker. If I called it a blue marker, "blue" would be the adjective. Or if I said: "This is a colourful marker" or "a dull marker", these are all adjectives to describe the noun "marker". Okay. So, here are some other examples of adjectives. We can use the word "cold", okay? Right now I'm cold. We can use the word "hot"; that's an adjective. "Tall", "old", "rich", "poor". We use these words to describe something. Okay? So, a lot of the times we like to compare things. Okay? We like to compare people. Okay? Which celebrity is hotter? Okay? Which...? Which dress is nicer? In English, we often compare two things; and when we compare things, we need to use comparative adjectives. So, let's look at that. So, we have some rules when it comes to using adjectives to compare two things. When an adjective, so such as these, are one syllable or one beat, we add "er" to it when we want to use it to compare. So, let's look at an example of this-okay?-because it's sort of hard to understand unless you actually see what I'm talking about. I have here two cups. Okay? I want to compare these two cups. This cup is old, this cup is new, so when I compare these two cups, I add the word "er" to the adjective when I compare them. So, I can say: "This cup is older than this cup. This cup is newer than this cup." Okay? So, let's look at this. What did I do? I added "er" to the word "old", and I added "er" to the word "new". So, when I'm comparing two things, if the adjective... In this case, the adjective is "old" and "new". If the adjective is one syllable or one beat, meaning it's a short adjective, we add "er". Let's look at another example. This book is very heavy. So, I have here this book: The Unabridged Edgar Allan Poe. It's a very nice book, but it's very heavy. And then I have this book: The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly. It's a book written by a South Korean author that's really good, but it's... It's very light. Okay? So, I want to compare these two books. What can I say about these two books? How are they different? Well, this book is very long. This book is longer than this book. Okay? This book is longer than this book. So, notice we have the word "long"; this is long; that describes the book. And we add "er"-"er"-to compare it to this book. Now, maybe I want to talk about this book. I can say: "This book is shorter than this book." And, again, all I need to do is add "er" to the adjective. Sorry. So, this book is longer; this book is shorter. Let's look at another example. I have a lot of things today to show you. Best part of all: The swords. Okay? These are swords. I don't know if you can see that, but this is a little sword. It looks like something you could put in a sandwich, maybe. This is a much bigger sword. So, how can we compare these two? Well, again, there's many things we can say about these two swords; there's many adjectives we can use to describe them. Let's look at the one we have on the board. Let's do... Well, this isn't really thicker. We can say "longer" and "shorter" with this. We can also say: "lighter" and "heavier". This sword is a heavier sword. Okay? It's a lot bigger. It's bigger and it's heavier. This sword is smaller. Okay? Notice it's smaller and it's lighter. So, what I did there was I just added "er" or the sound "er" to "heavy" to make it "heavier", and I added "er" to small to make it "smaller". Okay? So let's do some more practice […]
Learn English: How to use I'D BETTER & I'D BETTER NOT Learn English: How to use I'D BETTER & I'D BETTER NOT
2 years ago En
"It's late. I'd better go." Have you ever heard this in conversation or a movie? The expressions "I'd better" and "I'd better not" are very, very common in conversation. In this English class, you will learn what these expressions mean, how to use them, and how not to use them. We will look at many examples of the use of these expressions, and I'll explain the grammar too. You will also learn about the meaning of "you'd better", which we use to express an order or a strong suggestion. At the end of the video, try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-better-better-not/ to practice what you have learned. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you a very common and important expression we use in English, and that expression is: "I'd better"; or in the negative form: "I'd better not". So we use this expression a lot. But before I teach you how to use this expression, I'm going to give you an example to help you understand when we use this expression. Okay, so let's get started. So I have here my friend Jack, and you'll notice Jack is a little confused. He has a whole bunch of question marks around his head, because he's thinking. So, what is Jack thinking about? Well, Jack has a test at 8am, and he's nervous about his test, and so he's wondering: "What should I do?" That's what Jack is thinking. So I want you to think about: What should Jack do in this situation? He has a test at 8am. Should he go to bed early? Should he party all night? Or should he watch TV all night? What do you think? And he really wants to do well on his test. Well, hopefully, you know, you said the first one: Jack should go to bed early. So this is when we would use the expression: "I'd better". We would use it in this case. And what does it mean? We use: "I'd better" when we want to talk about something that's a good idea to do; and if we don't do it, there might be a problem. Okay? So, for example: "I'd better go to bed early." This is something Jack would say, because going to bed early is a good idea. He has a test to study for... Or, sorry. He has a test the next day, so it's very important that he goes to bed early. Okay? So let's make this into an expression Jack can say. "I'd better", and then we put the verb, which is the action or the good idea. So, in Jack's case, Jack would say: "I'd better go to bed. I'd better go to bed." So, now let's look at more examples of the expression: "I'd better". Okay, so you might be wondering: What does "I'd better" stand for? If you actually break up the "I'd", because "I'd" is a contraction, it stands for: "I had better". But usually when we use: "I'd better", we don't usually use it with the word "had"; we usually use it in conversation with the contraction. And so, the way we pronounce that is: "I'd better". So let's look at some examples with this expression. Okay, so I want you to imagine it's going to rain later today. What's a good idea? If it's going to rain, a good idea is to bring an umbrella. So, we can use this expression to talk about this good idea. "I'd better bring an umbrella today because it's going to rain." Okay? If I don't bring an umbrella, I'm going to get wet. So this is a good idea; and if I don't do it, something bad is probably going to happen - I'll get wet. So let's look at another example. "I'd better leave my house earlier because I don't want to be late." So maybe there's a meeting or a job interview, and you're thinking: "Oh, I need to get to work early", or: "I need to get to this job interview early." That's a good idea. A good idea is to leave my house early. So, because we're talking about a good idea, we say: "I'd better leave my house earlier than normal." If I don't leave my house early, maybe there will be problems getting to the interview; maybe I'll be late. Okay? So we often use "I'd better" when we're talking about a good idea; and if we don't do this good idea, there can be a problem. This is a very common thing you'll hear people say: "It's late", okay? Meaning it's late at night. You're at somebody's house: "It's late. I'd better go." Okay? So, I think this is actually probably the most common way we use this expression. You'll see it all the time in movies; somebody often says: "It's late. I'd better go." And then another example: "My friends are coming over." Okay? So, what's the good idea? Your friends are coming over. It's usually good to buy some food, maybe some drinks, so: "I'd better buy some food." Okay? So that's a good idea. If I don't buy food, my friends will be hungry. I just wanted to point out one thing. You'll notice after: "I'd better", it's the same in each sentence: "I'd better", "I'd better", "I'd better", "I'd better"... What comes right after the word "I'd better"...? Or, sorry. The expression is the verb. So, in this case, we have the verb "buy"; in this case, we have the verb "go"; we have the verb "leave"; and we have the verb "bring". […]
English for Beginners: Countable & Uncountable Nouns English for Beginners: Countable & Uncountable Nouns
2 years ago En
Do you think English grammar is confusing? Ever wonder why can we say "a dollar" but we can't say "a money"? Why can we say "houses", but not "furnitures"? In this class, you will learn the grammar rules about countable and uncountable nouns in English, including when to use "a" or "an", when to add an "s" at the end of a noun to make it plural, and when you should NOT add an "s". You will also learn about the difference between "much" and "many". Test yourself with the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/countable-uncountable-nouns-english-grammar/ Watch next: FIX YOUR GRAMMAR MISTAKES! -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnrAM9QZ90U&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=40 #engvid #LearnEnglish #EnglishGrammar TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you about countable and uncountable nouns. We can also call these "count nouns" and "non-count nouns". So, let's begin by first talking about: What is a noun? So, a noun is a word that is a person... It can be a person, so: "Emma", that's a noun; "teacher", that's a noun. It can be a place. "Russia" is a noun. "School" is a noun. It can be an animal; a dog. "Dog" is a noun. The word "cat" is a noun. It can also be a thing. This marker... The word "marker" is a noun. Okay? And it can also be a feeling. "Happiness" is a noun. So, a noun is a person, a place, a thing, an object, an animal. There are many things that are nouns. What a noun is not is it's not an action, like a verb; it's not a description, like an adjective; and it's not a preposition, like the word "on" or "off". Okay? A noun is, like I've said before, one of these things. So, in English... Well, actually, first let's do something. Let's underline the nouns just to make sure we have this concept. So, my first sentence is: "Canada is a large country." So let's underline the nouns, here. Well, "Canada" is a place, so we know "Canada" is a noun; "is" is a verb; "large" - this is a description; "country". "Country" is a place; this is also a noun. "My teacher is funny". "Teacher" is a person, so this is a noun; "funny" is a description, it's an adjective, it's not a noun. "The dog", so we have "dog" is an animal; "cats", "cats" are nouns; and we have the word, here, "friends". The word "friend" is also a noun. Okay? So, these are all nouns. So, in English, we have two types of nouns; we have countable nouns and we have uncountable nouns. It's important to know if a noun is countable or uncountable, because this is going to tell us if we use words, like: "a" in front of the word, and it will also tell us which words we cannot use with these words. So... And whether or not we need to add an "s" to the end of the noun if there's more than one. So, in this video, we are going to talk about countable nouns with many examples and uncountable nouns. So, let's look at countable nouns first. Okay, so we're going to start with countable nouns first. So, the first thing you need to know with a countable noun is when we have a countable noun, we need to put an "a" or an "an" in front of it. So, for example: "I have a dog. I have a computer. I have a lamp. I have a chair." So, notice I'm putting "a" in front of all of these. If the noun starts with a vowel sound, so for example: "a" is a vowel, "e", "i", "o", "u" - these are all vowels. And if it starts with a vowel sound, then we use "an". "I have an apple. I have an egg. I have an ant." Okay? So, we use this if the first... The first sound of the word is a vowel. So, the second thing you need to know is that with countable nouns a lot of the time we can count them. Okay? So we can often... A countable noun is something you can count, or... Usually it's something, or an animal, or, you know, a place - it's something you can count. So, for example: "I have a book." This is one book. "I have two books.", "I have three books." So, this... You can count books and it's a countable noun. "I have two chairs. I have five dresses." These are all countable nouns. When we have more than one countable noun, so for example, here we have one, here we have two. If we have more than one-so two, three, four, five, six-we need to add an "s". This shows us that there is more than one. And also notice that we don't need this in front of the noun anymore. So, we cannot say: "a books", because the "s" means there's more than one, so this would not match. Okay. What else do we need? So, we need an "s" or an "es" if we have more than one of this type of object or noun. Here's another example: "I have one sister.", "I have three sisters." So, notice here, you can count the number of sisters I have, and so I've added an "s". Now, we have some exceptions. For example, the word "moose". You can count the number of moose, but we never add an "s". It's... It's a strange exception. In English, you'll notice we have a lot of exceptions. We break rules a lot of times in English and that's okay. It's the same with "fish".
12 English Expressions with ALL: "for all I know", "all along", "all talk"... 12 English Expressions with ALL: "for all I know", "all along", "all talk"...
2 years ago En
Do you want to learn some useful English expressions? In this video, I will teach you common expressions with the word "all" in them. What does it mean when someone is a "know-it-all" or "not all there"? What is the difference between "all along" and "all over"? I will also teach about the following expressions: all in all, all-nighter, all the way, for all I know, for all I care, all for it, all talk, and once and for all. After watching the video, take my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-idioms-all/ to practice what you've learned. #engvid #LearnEnglish #expressions TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some new expressions. These expressions all have the word "all" in them. Okay? So you're going to learn a lot of new words today, or a lot of new expressions. So, let's get started. The first expression I want to teach you is one of my favourites: "an all-nighter". So, an all-nighter is when you stay awake for over 24 hours. So, you do not sleep. So, who pulls an all-nighter? Usually students before an exam or a test might pull an all-nighter; or maybe somebody has a big project and they don't have time to sleep because they want to finish the project, so they might pull an all-nighter. You'll notice that the verb we often use with "all-nighter" is "pull". An all-nighter is a noun, so we have "an". "I pulled an all-nighter." This means: I did not sleep for more than 24 hours. When I was a student, I only pulled an all-nighter once. Okay? Which is good. That's pretty good. Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? I hope you're not the type of person that pulls all-nighters all the time, because I have a friend who does that all the time, and - ugh, seems so terrible. So that's the word "all-nighter". What's another expression with the word "all"? I like this one a lot, too: "all talk". So, "all talk" is an adjective, and it means when we talk about doing something, but we never do it. Okay? So, I have some friends who are all talk. That means that they always talk about doing something, but they never have done it or they never will. So, for example, I have one friend named Chris, and Chris has a boss who he just hates. His boss is a terrible boss, and he's been working at the same company for three years, and his boss and him get into arguments all the time. Now, what Chris says every time I see Chris is Chris says: "You know, I almost punched my boss today. I was so angry with my boss, I almost punched him today", which is not a good thing to do to anybody, but, you know, also not a good thing to do to your boss. So, what I say to Chris is: "Chris, you are all talk. You will never punch your boss", and that's a good thing. But "all talk" - Chris always says he's going to punch his boss, but he never actually does. Maybe you have a friend like this. I have another friend who says that, you know, she's going to quit her job. She hates her job and she's always saying: "You know, I'm going to quit my job. I'm going to quit my job." But she hasn't for a very long time, so you might say: "You're all talk." Okay? Meaning: You're not going to do it. Another expression we have here is: "all for it". "All for it" means when you strongly agree with a decision or an action. So, for example, I just told you about my friend who wants to quit her job - I'm all for it. That means I strongly agree with her to quit her job, because she's so unhappy there. "All for it". "All for it" is when we strongly agree with an action or a decision. Imagine you are at your friend's place, and somebody wants to order a pizza. If you agree with this decision, you can say: "I'm all for it. I'm all for ordering pizza." Okay? Maybe you want to study in Toronto. Maybe you're learning English, and your dream is to come to Toronto to study English. I'm from Toronto, so what I would say to that is: "I'm all for it." That means I agree with your decision. Okay? So, these are just some of the ways we can use "all for it". Let's look at some other examples of expressions with "all" in them. So, our next expression is kind of interesting because it has the word "all" in it twice. "All in all". "All in all". So, what does "all in all" mean? Well, we use it to mean everything considered, or it's another way to say: "On the whole". So, for example, maybe I'm talking about my trip - my trip to France, and I'm saying: "Oh, the food was great, you know, the people were wonderful, I loved it, but it rained, you know, so that was kind of disappointing, but everything else was amazing." When I look at the trip completely, what I can say when I consider everything, I can say: "All in all, we had an amazing time in France". "All in all" - when you consider everything. "All in all, you know, there's some things I like about English, maybe some things like certain types of grammar are annoying; but all in all, English is a really cool language." […]
Practice your VOCABULARY, LISTENING, and COMPREHENSION with this game Practice your VOCABULARY, LISTENING, and COMPREHENSION with this game
2 years ago En
Want to improve your listening skills and improve your vocabulary at the same time? Do you want to have fun while learning? In this video, I will teach you common words we use while describing people's faces. Then, you will practice your listening skills in a fun and interesting activity. Get a pen and paper ready for this interactive and hands-on video. If you want even more practice, try my helpful quiz at the end of the video at https://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-listening-comprehension-faces-game/ #engvid #vocabulary #LearnEnglish Next, watch my video on 11 'MIND' Expressions in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_N9iPueids&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=12 TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to do something very special. Okay? We are going to practice our listening skills by doing a really, really fun activity that I love to do with my classes. So, for this video, we are going to be listening for adjectives about the face. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a whole bunch of new words, and maybe some words you already know, when... That we can use to describe our faces. Okay? So you are going to first learn some new words and we're going to review some words; and once you have these words down, what we are going to do is I am going to describe a face to you, and while I describe it, you're going to listen carefully and you are going to draw the face. Okay? So this is what you're going to do: You're going to take your pen or your pencil, and a piece of paper, and you are going to draw what I describe. Okay? Now, it's okay if you're not a great artist; you don't have to be for this video. You don't have to Picasso or Leonardo Da Vinci. Okay? As you can tell, I'm not the greatest of artists, so that's okay. But after you listen and you draw what I say, you're going to look at your picture and you're going to compare it to my picture or what I was describing. And then you can see: "Okay. Are these the same? Are they different? Did I follow the instructions? Did I understand these adjectives correctly?" And so this is a great way to really practice your listening, and to also learn some new words. All right? So let's get started. Ta-da. Here is my art. Okay? So I'm going to describe these pictures now, just so you learn some new words, and we're... We're also going to review maybe some words you already know. Okay? And I hope none of my drawings creep you out; I know that, you know, they might be a little bit unusual, but let's get started. So, when we're talking about faces, there's many different ways to describe a face; I've just picked two. This man has a long face. Okay? His face is in the shape of an oval, but it's also very long. Now, compare this to this person who has a round face; more like a circle. Okay? So, during the description I'm going to be describing faces, and I'm going to either use the word: "a long face" or "a round face". Okay? So, here we have the eyes, we have the nose, we have the mouth... In this picture we have lips which are these things, so we might have really red lips or big lips, like Angelina Jolie; maybe small lips, thin lips. Okay? Another thing I'm going to talk about in this video is eyebrows. So, the eyebrows are this part of your face; they're the hairy part above the eyes, here. So, I have two different types of eyebrows. These eyebrows... So you see we have eyes here. The eyebrows here are very thin; whereas these eyebrows are thick, or we can also call them bushy eyebrows. Okay? Because they almost look like bushes. Bushy or thick. Okay. Another thing you're going to hear during this listening activity is I'm going to talk about wrinkles. So, what's a "wrinkle"? Well, as you get older, your face starts to develop these lines, usually around the eyes or maybe around, you know, your smile - and we call these age lines wrinkles. Okay? So here's the spelling of that word. So, you'll be hearing this word during the listening activity. You might also hear the word "braces". So, braces are something that helps your teeth to become straight. So, during the listening, one of the people I'm going to be describing may have braces. So this is the teeth, and it's just a piece of wire that goes across the teeth to help keep the teeth straight. Okay. So, anything else on this picture? No? Let's move on to this picture. The other thing you might hear during this activity is I might be describing facial hair. So, when I'm talking about facial hair, I'm not talking about the hair on the head; I'm talking about the hair on the face. So, this man has a lot of facial hair. He has a beard, which is hair that comes from your chin, down. You might have a short beard or a very long beard. This man has a long beard. I also put a moustache on this man, so that's the facial hair or the hair under the nose - the moustache. And this is how we spell that word. […]
Find a NEW JOB in North America: Cover Letter & Resume Advice Find a NEW JOB in North America: Cover Letter & Resume Advice
2 years ago En
Looking for a job? You will need to create a resume and a cover letter. But the rules on what to include and what NOT to include are different from country to country. To get you started, I've put together this lesson on writing cover letters and resumes, where I will give you all of my key tips. I will also talk about the reasons why we write cover letters and resumes and give you some important points on formatting. Watch my other job skill videos to learn about job interviews and for specific vocabulary you should use on your resume. Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/north-america-jobs-cover-letter-resume-advice/ Download a sample resume here: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/resume-sample-tips/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to talk to you about cover letters and resumes. So, if you are going to be looking for a job soon... Maybe you're new to Canada, or England, or the USA, or new to an English-speaking country and you're looking for a job or you will be looking for a job soon, this video can really help you with that. Cover letters and resumes really are different in different parts of the world. Okay? So there's a lot of different cultural parts that you need to know when you're writing a cover letter or resume, and in this video I'm going to talk about the cultural aspects of both. So, this video you're going to learn more of an overview about cover letters and resumes, what their purpose is, and the type of information we include on them. Okay, so let's get started. Okay, so a cover letter and a resume are two different documents that have very different formats. They look very differently from one another. A cover letter is a letter format, whereas a resume has its own special format, but there are certain things that are common or the same for both. One of the things that's common for both a cover letter and a resume is their purpose. The purpose of a cover letter and resume is to help you get an interview for a job, or help you get the job. Okay? So, when you think about a cover letter or a resume, imagine a company is asking you: "Why should we hire you? What makes you special? What makes you right for this job?" Your cover letter and your resume are the answer to this. They tell employers about your amazing skills. Okay? Maybe you know CPR, maybe you're great when it comes to computers, maybe you speak four languages. Okay? So they tell your employer... Your future employers this. They talk about your abilities, they talk about your experience, your education experience, your work experience, you know, maybe some other organizations you're a part of and the experiences you had there, and they also talk about your accomplishments, your successes. Okay? Maybe at this company you increased sales, maybe you won a customer service award because you're so great when it comes to talking to customers. Okay? So your resume and cover letter show all these great things about you, and they answer the question: Why should we hire you? Okay? So, a lot of people want to know: "Do I need both a cover letter and a resume? Can I just give my resume or just my cover letter?" For most jobs you will need at the very least a resume. Okay? This is one of the most important things you give when you're applying for a job, and then for a lot of jobs they also will want a cover letter. So, how do you know if you need both? Well, when you apply to the job, look at the job advertisement. Usually in the advertisement they say if they want just a resume, or if they want a cover letter and a resume. If you don't know and you can't find the information, it's a good idea to send both. A lot of people want to know: "Can I reuse my resume and cover letter for each job I apply for? Writing cover letters and resumes are a lot of work, so can I just give the same cover letter and resume to everybody, and every job I apply for?" In general, that's not a good idea, and the reason is usually companies can tell that they're getting the same resume and cover letter as other companies, because you're not saying specific things about how your skills match this company's skills or this company's... What this company wants. So as a result, it's always the best idea to write a different cover letter for each job you apply for. Okay? I know that's a lot of work, but you will be more likely... You're more likely to get the job if you do a good job on your cover letter instead of just sending everyone the same ones, and it's the same with resumes. You know, different jobs you might want to highlight or talk about different things on your resume. If you're applying to this company, maybe you'll talk about a certain work experience, whereas this company maybe you'll talk about a different work experience. Okay? So very important to write your cover letter and your resume for each job. […]
Learn English Vocabulary: FAKE NEWS Learn English Vocabulary: FAKE NEWS
2 years ago En
Have you heard of "fake news"? What about the words "conspiracy theory" and "hoax"? The topic of fake news has become very popular in the news lately. It refers to information that is not true or not accepted as truth by mainstream society. In this video, I will teach you some key vocabulary we use when talking about fake news. I'll also give you examples of their use. Next, I will talk about some expressions you can use if someone gives you fake news or tells you a story that isn't true. After watching, take my quiz to practice the new words and expressions you've learned. https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-vocabulary-fake-news/ Next, watch this lesson on negative political vocabulary that you will hear in the news often: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45e99fofgJc&index=10&list=PLpRs5DzS7VqpcTS7hXJU4ARPwSETGI1gy TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you some key expressions you can use when somebody tells you something that's not true and you want to argue against what they're saying. So, in this video I'm going to teach you these great expressions, but before I do that, we're going to talk about three words that are very common in English these days. Those three words are: "Fake news", "conspiracy theories", and "hoaxes". So in this video you will learn what these words mean, and you will also learn what to say to somebody that tells you something that's not true. All right, so let's get started. So I have here three sentences. The first sentence is: "Scientists say the earth is flat. Not round." Is this true or not true? Okay, this sentence is not true. Some people believe this, but it is not true. My second sentence: "Michael Jackson is alive and living as Kim Kardashian." True or not true? Again, we have a sentence that is not true; I made this up. And finally, my third sentence: "Listening to rock music causes cancer." Is this true or untrue? Again, this is untrue; I also made up this. So my point here is that a lot of what you hear from people in conversation not true. People say these types of things all the time, and you will know that this is something that's not true, so what do you say when someone tells you that the earth is flat, or they tell you that Michael Jackson is living as Kim Kardashian? Okay? So, I will teach you those great expressions you can use. Before I do that, I wanted to just say that these three sentences can also be considered fake news. So, we will look at the meaning of fake news in a moment. Okay, so the three main words I wanted to teach you today are words that you will see a lot on the internet and in the media. The first word is: "fake news". So what is fake news? Well, "fake" means not true. "Fake news" is news stories that are not true, and they're created to damage a person, a business, an agency, or a government, or they might also be created to get attention and to get clicks on the internet. So you'll see a lot of fake news on different social media, like Twitter, Facebook, and a lot of other places, too, online. So, this is a very common word these days, a lot of people are using it, so it's important that you know what it means. We also have the word here: "conspiracy theory". So, "a conspiracy theory" is an explanation of an event or situation that is different from the official account. A lot of the times conspiracy theories are about a government or a business doing something illegal or to harm someone. Okay? So let's think of some conspiracy theories. Some people believe that the moon landing, so when... When astronauts went to the moon in the 1960s, some people believe the moon landing was fake. This is a popular conspiracy theory. Another conspiracy theory I heard recently is some people believe that Paul McCartney from the Beetles actually died in 1966, and there is a different man who replaced him and who is actually the better musician. So this is a different conspiracy theory. So, you'll see a lot of conspiracy theories on the internet, and a lot of people will tell you conspiracy theories during conversations. The last word I wanted to teach you was the word: "hoax", "hoax". So, "a hoax" is a type of practical joke that is meant to embarrass or hurt people. So some examples of hoaxes are you'll have these death hoaxes, where they'll say a celebrity is dead, but it's not true; it's a joke. Or you might have a hoax, like, you know, some people might take a picture of an alien or a monster and tell everyone: "Look, we have evidence of this monster alien." But if it's not true, then it's a hoax. It's a joke, a practical joke. So, again, fake news, conspiracy theories, and hoaxes are very common on the internet, and so for these things that are not true, what do you say to people when they tell you this untrue information? Well, let's find out in a moment. […]
Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE
2 years ago En
What does "in case" mean? When do we use it? In this video, you will learn about this commonly used expression. This lesson is part vocabulary and part grammar. After watching, you will be able to use "in case" properly in a sentence, which will be very useful for expressing a request, a condition, a particular event, and more. Take my quiz at the end of the video to practice using "in case". You can watch the video more than once in case you forget something. TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON HERE: https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-expressions-just-in-case/ WATCH ANOTHER VIDEO NOW: 1. How to use ABOUT TO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQx2tEWxC1Q&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=17&t=0s 2. WHILE or MEANWHILE? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EofcMDlVNIk&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=82&t=0s TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you about a very important piece of vocabulary -- it's also very important when it comes to grammar -- and that is the expression: "Just in case" or we can also say: "in case". So, we use this a lot in English, so it's very... It's something very important for you to learn. So let's talk about what it means and how we use it. So, we use: "in case" or "just in case"-we use both-when we are talking about doing something to prevent a problem. Okay? So we're talking about... Or doing something to prepare for a problem. So, we're looking at a problem and we're looking at preparation or prevention of that problem. Okay? So, for example: "Tonight, I am going to a restaurant." I'm very excited. Now, the problem is I get cold very easily, and when I'm cold I'm not a very nice person; I get very cranky, and I'm not a good person to be with when I'm cold. So my problem is I get cold easily. What is my prevention or preparation for this problem? Well: "I will bring a sweater just in case I get cold." Okay? And that way I will have a great time at the restaurant, hopefully. So my problem is being cold, and my preparation is I'm going to bring a sweater. So, as you can see, if you think about life, we have a lot of these types of problems and we do a lot of things to prepare for these types of problems. So let's look at some other examples. Okay, a problem is when it rains... Okay? A lot of the times when it rains, you know, I don't like getting wet, so what do I do? Well, my preparation or prevention is I bring an umbrella, or maybe I'll bring a rain jacket. Okay? So: "I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains." Another problem is if you work at 9am, you know, a lot of the times there's a lot of cars; everybody's going to work at the same time, there's a lot of traffic. And if there's a lot of traffic maybe you'll be late for work. So what will you do for this problem? So, traffic is the problem or maybe going to work late is the problem, but what you can do to prevent or prepare for this problem is you can leave your house early. So: "I leave my house early every day just in case there's traffic." Another example of a problem is maybe you're going to visit your friend, and your friend gives you their address. Now, if you don't write down their address, you're going to be lost. I don't know where they live. I need to go to my friends' house, I forget their address; I don't know where they live. So this is the problem. Especially if you're very forgetful like me or you always forget people's phone numbers or, you know, where people live, this is a big problem. So what do you do to prevent this problem? Well, you write down their address. Okay? On a piece of paper, your friend tells you their address, you write it down. Why do you write it down? "You write down their address just in case you forget it." Okay? You forget their address. So I've just given you some examples of where we would use "just in case". There are a lot of examples for "just in case". I want you to think about your life. Is there something that happens every day to you, maybe you have some sort of problem or something you worry about? So think about that for a second. Is there something you worry about every day, and what do you do to prepare for that or to prevent a problem from happening? Okay? Maybe, you know, you're worried about failing your test, so you might create a study group just in case. Okay? Or maybe, you know, your teacher gives you homework. Maybe you will do the homework just in case they want to see it. So, you see what I'm saying? There's a lot of problems you might have, and a lot of preventions or preparations you do for those problems. So try to think of one in your own life. Okay, so now we are going to look at the grammar of "just in case" or "in case". Okay, so we've already looked at what are problems, and how we prepare or prevent problems. Now let's look at some examples of: How do we create this sentence in a grammatical fashion? So, I have here the sentence: "I will bring an umbrella in case it rains." […]
My TOP 5 Writing Tips (for all levels) My TOP 5 Writing Tips (for all levels)
2 years ago En
Whether English is your first, second, or third language, developing your writing abilities will help you in educational, work, and social media contexts. In this lesson, I will talk about writing in general and discuss both formal and informal writing. It is critical to learn the difference between formal and informal writing, including differences based on vocabulary, grammar, and format. I will teach you some strategies for how to plan your writing. My five tips will help you improve your writing regardless of your current level. Watch the video, follow my advice, and your writing will improve. Test yourself with the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/my-top-5-writing-tips-for-all-levels/ Did you like this video? Keep improving by watching another video now: 1. 5 MORE tips on how to improve your writing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgkRoYPLhts&t=0s&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=107 2. Writing an Essay: Paraphrasing the question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9aVjBHEEbU&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=30&t=0s TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you some great writing tips. These tips are for both academic writing and non-academic writing. Okay? So it's for writing in general. Now, this video is going to be in two parts, because I have so many tips, so I'm going to give five tips in this video and five tips in the next video. Okay, so let's get started. So, there are so many different ways... Or so many different types of writing we do in our lives; we write emails, we write essays if we're a student, we might write a Facebook post, or we might write a resume or a cover letter. So it's very important to develop your writing skills because you will be writing throughout your life a lot. So let's look at my first tip. My first tip is: It's very important to think about the genre of what you're writing. "Genre" is a very fancy word that pretty much means type. So, a genre of writing might be an essay, or it might be a cover letter, or an email, or a tweet. These are all different genres, and each one of these has a different expectation on what you should include and how you should write it. So it's very important, first step is: Know the genre or know the type, and know what is expected of you. Also important in this is knowing your audience, or thinking about your audience. So, for example, if you write an email, the language you're going to use and the way you're going to write will be different if you write an email to your friend versus an email to your boss. So it's important to think about: "Who are you writing to?" because this is going to help you decide what to write and how to write it. Same with, you know, if you are on Twitter and you write a tweet, or on Facebook a Facebook post, you know, it's important to think about your audience. You know, are you writing this post for friends to see, or is this a post your boss might see, or members of the public? You know, and that could be a problem. So it's important to think about, especially with this and on other social media, too: Audience. Who will see this and what will they think about it, and what are their expectations? You know, some people work for companies where they're responsible for social media, so it's important, too, the type of wording they use when they're writing on Facebook. If you work at a company and you're writing for your company, it's going to be different than if you're writing for your friends. Same with an essay. An essay has a certain structure, you know, it's supposed to be a certain amount of pages, it has a certain organization to it, and so knowing what's expected of you when you write an essay will help you because it's going to be very different than, for example, a Facebook post. Same with in business, business reports. Understanding the format of a business report is important if this is something you're going to be writing, and thinking about your audience. Same with executive summaries, which is a type of thing businesspeople write. If you're not in business you might not ever write one of these, but if you are in business you need to realize that audience is important because professionals are going to be reading this, and these people are busy, so, you know, knowing your audience and knowing what is expected of you is the very first step to good writing. Let's look at some other tips. Okay, so we've talked about genre or the type of writing you're doing, and part of this is knowing the expectations for how long what you write should be. Okay? So you want to know a bit about length expectations before you start writing. This is really important, especially in university where you often have a number of pages you're allowed to write. It's important, you know, in the workplace because sometimes, you know, you can't write a lot. […]
Why you should make mistakes, and how to learn from them Why you should make mistakes, and how to learn from them
2 years ago En
Are you embarrassed or frustrated when you make mistakes? You are not alone. Many learners feel bad when they make a mistake, but they don't realize that making mistakes can help them improve! In fact, making mistakes is one of the BEST WAYS TO LEARN, especially if you are trying to learn a language. In this video, I will teach you that making mistakes is a very important part of learning a language. I will then show you some ways you can use your mistakes to improve your English. We will go through some practical tips on what you should do to maximize your learning. Which mistakes should you focus on? How do you know what your mistakes are? How can you make sure that you are improving? For answers to these questions and more, watch the video. Now it's time to watch another video! Watch this video about how to stop wasting time and start learning: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REJNBGEAQRo&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=11&t=0s Take the quiz on this lesson: https://www.engvid.com/why-you-should-make-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about mistakes and why we should make them, and: What should we do when we make them? Okay? So, I hope you're making mistakes; very, very important when you're learning anything. Whether it's math, science, English, French, Spanish, Chinese - you want to make mistakes. Okay? I cannot say that enough. If you're not making mistakes, then you're doing something wrong because if you're making mistakes it means you're actually using the language or, you know, you're actually... It's very important in the learning process to make mistakes. So, in this video I'm going to teach you six ways or six steps on how to improve with mistakes. Okay? So, before I get started, I just wanted to again say: Please, please, please make mistakes, especially when you're learning a language because mistakes equal good learning. Okay? So, I... You know, I know a lot of students when they go out and they're talking to a native speaker, they feel so embarrassed. "Oh my goodness, I just... I can't believe I just said that. I made a mistake with the present perfect. Oh my god", it's not a big deal, you should be making these mistakes. So, the first step on how to learn from your mistakes is: Give yourself permission to make mistakes. Okay? You want to tell yourself it's okay, and I can't stress this enough. Tell yourself: "I need to make mistakes. Today I'm going to try make mistakes.", "Another mistake? Yay me. Woo! Very good." Okay? So give yourself permission. Don't look at mistakes as a bad thing because they are not a bad thing. Mistakes, when learning a language, are actually a good thing. So, step two: Once you give yourself permission to make mistakes, you should start to know your mistakes. Okay? What are the mistakes you're making? So one way you can find out what mistakes you're making is you can ask your teacher, or your friend, or, you know, somebody you're close to, maybe your classmate. You can ask them: "What's my biggest mistake? When I speak English, what's my biggest mistake? In my writing, what's my biggest mistake?" Okay? So a lot of the times other people can help and tell you what your biggest mistake is. Another thing you should be asking: "Why is it a mistake? What is the problem with this? Why is it a mistake?" Okay? A lot of the times with students I've found, and I'm also guilty of this, I remember in university I would write an essay and I would get all these comments on my essay and I'd also get a mark or a grade, you know, like A+, B, whatever. And I remember always looking just at the percent I got or the grade, and not looking at the comments. Those comments that your teachers write actually tell you a lot about the mistakes you're making, so please, please, please see that, read it, focus on it, and think about it. Okay? Whatever your teacher writes on your essay, on your test, take a moment to really think about that mistake. Also, another way to know what mistakes you're making is you can think about what mistakes are common for people speaking your language. So, for example, if a Spanish person is learning English, maybe they say: "I am agree", which is fine in Spanish, but in English it's a mistake; or maybe if you're Brazilian, you want to say the word "red" but you say the word "head" because the R sound and the H sound, I think, you know, with Brazilian students this is often a pronunciation mistake. So think about: What mistakes are common for your culture? We have a lot of resources on this on engVid actually, where you can actually see common mistakes for your language. Okay. I'm going to get into this in a moment with the next step, but I'll just say it right now because I really want you to think about this: When you ask somebody: "What is my biggest mistake?", try to focus on one mistake. […]
How to pronounce "OF" like a native English speaker How to pronounce "OF" like a native English speaker
2 years ago En
Stop talking like a robot! Some words don't always sound the same, and this is especially true when native English speakers speak quickly. In this short and simple video, I will teach you about the different ways we pronounce the preposition "of". For example, did you know we pronounce "a lot of" like "alotta" in conversations? Understanding the pronunciation of words can also help you develop better listening skills. Take the quiz to test your understanding: https://www.engvid.com/how-to-pronounce-of-like-a-native-english-speaker/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to help you with your pronunciation. Today I am going to teach you how to pronounce one of the most common words in English. That word is the word "of". Okay? So, when we say "of" just on its own as a single word, we usually pronounce it like this: "ov", which has kind of like a "v" sound at the end, "of". Now, that's kind of hard to pronounce. There's an easier way that we pronounce this word when we use it in a sentence or an expression, and that's what we're going to learn today. So let's get started. Okay, so I have here some English expressions. I have: "A lot of", "Slice of pie", "Piece of cake". Now, when I actually say this, I don't say: "ov". I want you to listen very carefully to what I'm actually saying and how I pronounce the word "of" in these expressions. Okay? "A lot a". I'll say that one more time: "A lot a". "Slice a pie", "Slice a pie", "Piece a cake", "Piece a cake". Okay? Now, I've said it a little louder than I usually would, but you'll notice I didn't say: "Slice ov pie", I said: "A slice a pie". So my point here is that native speakers of English, especially North American English, usually do not pronounce "of" like this; we actually pronounce it more like "a". Okay? So, what we can do is we can actually add an "a" here. So I want you to repeat after me: "A lot a", "A lot a", "I have a lot a friends." Okay? "A lot a". And we also say "a" a little bit quieter because it's not a stressed syllable. So we like to say it quieter than the rest of the expression. "Slice a pie". So I can remove this and add an "a". So let's say that together: "Slice a pie". All right, now let's try this expression: "A piece a cake". So this means it's something that's easy, so: "piece a cake". Okay? So let's do some practice together. And you will see "of" a lot in English, so this is a really good word to practice and to get used to pronouncing in a native speaker way, because: A) it will be easier to understand you, and B) "a" is a lot easier to say than "ov". Okay? So let's practice these sentences together. So, I've put the word "of" with a red underline, and anytime you see "of", I want you to change it to "a", okay? So, let's say this together: "It is made of brick. It is made of brick.", "He has lots of money. He has lots of money." Okay. "Game of Thrones." If you like that TV show, that's a really important thing to be able to pronounce. "Game of Thrones.", "I thought of something." So, again, let's turn this to "a": "I thought of something.", "It's a piece of cake." And that means it's something very easy. "It's a piece of cake." Okay? This is actually one of my favourite idioms: "It's a piece of cake." All right? So now let's do some more practice on the word "of" and its pronunciation. So one thing you can do if you're having trouble with the pronunciation of "of" in sentences, or expressions, or phrases is you can actually just put the "a" underneath "of" to help remind you. Okay? So this is one thing you can do when you're practicing the pronunciation of this. So let's practice some more sentences. "That's a nice piece of furniture." Okay? So now I want you to try: "That's a nice piece of furniture." And, again, when we say this part, we're not saying it loud, we're not saying: "Piece a furniture", we say it kind of quietly: "Piece of furniture". Okay? Let's try the next one: "The cost of living is high. The cost of living is high." Okay. You can do it one more time. "The cost..." Sorry. "The cost of living is high." All right. Let's do this next sentence. And, by the way, at the time of filming, Justin Trudeau is the Prime Minister, just in case, you know, it changes, I want this to make some sense. "The Prime Minister of Canada is handsome." Okay? He's a handsome man. "The Prime Minister of Canada is handsome." Okay? So now you can try to say that. Okay. Now let's try another sentence: "Many of the shows are comedies. Many of the shows are comedies." Okay? And when we say this part, we also kind of say it quicker, too. "Many of the shows are comedies", versus if I said: "Many of the shows are comedies." You can say that, but again, most native speakers say it very quick and more like a "a" sound. "Many of the shows are comedies." All right, and let's try one more: "Ottawa is..." So first I'll say it slow. "Ottawa is north of Toronto. Ottawa is north of Toronto." So now you try to say it. […]
How to succeed in your JOB INTERVIEW: Behavioral Questions How to succeed in your JOB INTERVIEW: Behavioral Questions
2 years ago En
Think about your last job interview. What did you do to prepare for it, and how did it go? Job interviews are difficult whether you are an English learner or a native speaker. If you want to get the job, you need to prepare for the job interview. In many English-speaking countries, interviews often include behavioral questions. In this lesson, I will teach you about behavioral interview questions and how to answer them. This video also has a listening practice portion to train you to recognize these questions, as well as tips on how to prepare for them. Try our quiz at the end to practice what you have learned, nail that interview, and get that job! Then work like a dog for the rest of your life :) Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/job-interview-behavioral-questions/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to do really well on your interview. So, if you're looking for a job and you have an interview coming up, I'm going to talk to you about a type of question you might hear during your interview. I'm going to tell you how to recognize this type of question, and how to answer this type of question, along with many tips that can help you. Okay? So if you're about to do an interview, don't stress out - we can do it. All right, so let's look at the types of questions we're going to talk about today. Today we're talking about behavioural interview questions. Okay? So let's look at some examples to understand what I mean by "behavioural interview questions". Okay, so we have this question: "Tell me about a time when you worked effectively under pressure." So take a moment to think about that question. "Give an example of how you worked on a team.", "Describe a time when you had to deal with a very upset customer.", "Have you ever made a mistake? How did you handle it?" Okay, so when we're talking about behavioural questions, it's important to think about: What is being asked of you? Okay? So, the main thing with these types of questions is this word here: "Give an example". Behavioural questions... behavioural interview questions require that you give an example of how you have dealt with or handled a situation. So, my next question to you is: Do you think we're talking about an example of the past, something that's happened; the present; or the future, something that could happen? So look at these questions. Are we talking about a past example, a present example, or a future example? If you said: "Past example", you are correct. When we talk about behavioural interview questions, what the interviewer is asking is they want you to give a past example. Okay? Something you have done in the past. How can you recognize these types of questions? Because there are many different interview types of questions, these are just one type, so how do you know if it's behavioural interview question? That's a very good question. One way to know is by looking for key words. Okay? So, a lot of the times behavioural questions start off with some sort of hint or clue. "Tell me about a time" is an example. Okay? "Tell me about a time when you worked effectively under pressure.", "Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.", "Tell me about a time when you had problems with your co-workers." Okay? So lot of the times you will hear: "Tell me about" or "Tell me about a time", and that's a signal: Okay, this is probably a behavioural interview question. You might have this as a starter to the question, they might ask you: "Give me an example of how you worked on a team." or "Give me an example of a time when you showed leadership." Okay? So those would both be behavioural questions. Again: "Describe a time". A lot of the times you'll hear the word: "a time" or "an example". So this is another common phrase you will hear with behavioural interview questions. You might also have a question like this: "Have you ever made a mistake?", "Have you ever had difficulties working with somebody?", "Have you ever had a conflict with a customer?", "How did you handle it? What did you do?" So these types of questions, they don't have the same key words as the ones above, but usually they're written or they're said with the present perfect tense, and usually you'll hear a second follow-up question: "How did you handle it?" Okay? So, key word here: "did". If you hear the past tense in the question, then they probably want you to answer the question using a past example. Okay? So, this might be a little bit confusing, you might be a bit worried, you know: "Oh, these questions seem really hard." Well, the very first step is recognizing these questions, so that's what we're going to do right now. We are going to practice recognizing behavioural interview questions. Okay, so now we are going to practice identifying behavioural interview questions. Okay? […]
Learn English Vocabulary: The people we LOVE ❤ – spouse, girlfriend, partner, husband... Learn English Vocabulary: The people we LOVE ❤ – spouse, girlfriend, partner, husband...
2 years ago En
Ready for an English lesson on romantic relationships? There are many terms we use when talking about people in romantic relationships. Spouse, partner, significant other, husband, wife, better half, lover, girlfriend, boyfriend, couple, and common-law are just some examples of relationship terms we'll be talking about in this video. I will teach you why some people might prefer the term partner instead of husband or wife. We will also discuss what people call the family of their husband or wife. For example, what does the term in-law mean and how do we use it to describe our partner's family? After you've watched this lesson and learned what we call people we are in a relationship with when talking about them, watch Ronnie's lesson to learn what we call them when talking TO them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URoJ6l5MVlY Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-people-we-love/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about love and romance, and all those wonderful relationship words. Okay? So, this video is very important when we're talking about conversational English and English vocabulary, because a lot of what we talk about is relationships. Maybe if we don't have a relationship, we might talk about our friends' relationships or our family's relationships, so it's good to know these words. So, we're going to talk about some of the more common words you'll hear people talk about. For example, maybe you've wondered before: "What's the difference between: 'spouse', 'husband', and 'partner'? When do I use these different terms?" Well, that's a great question. "What do you call a girlfriend or boyfriend when you're in your 60s?" That's a great question, too. So we have a lot of these questions students often ask, so in this video I'm going to answer them. So let's get started. To start with, let's talk about marriage. Okay? Getting married. What do you call somebody who is married? Well, there are multiple things you can call a person who is married. If we're looking at traditional terms, so terms a lot of people use that are more traditional, you might hear somebody talk about "a husband" if they're talking about a man who is married, you might hear them talk about their "hubby" if they're talking about a husband in an informal way. So, for example, I could talk about my husband or my hubby, they have the same meaning and they're talking about a man. I can also, if I'm talking about a woman, we can use the word "wife": "My wife". If we're talking about more than one husband, we can just add an "s" and say: "husbands". And if we're talking about more than one wife, we actually have to change the spelling from "f" to "v" and add an "s", and so this is pronounced: "wives". "Wife", "wives". Okay? So these are women and these are men. We also have another term which I like: "spouse". So, "spouse" is a word that can mean either a husband or a wife, it's a different word, but the point is that it can be a man or a woman. Okay? So you can talk about: "My spouse", "Your spouse", "How long have you and your spouse been married?" If you're having trouble remembering this word, you can think about a mouse, maybe a mouse who's married, that can help you remember the word "spouse" because it rhymes with "mouse". Okay. So these are more the traditional terms we use when we talk about people who are married. We also have less traditional terms that are very common and many people use. A less traditional term might be the term "partner". When we're talking about partner, you have your business partners, but in a relationship when you're talking about romance and love, you can also have a partner. So, "a partner" is someone you are in a relationship with. So, in this case, "partner" can mean that you're married to the person, so maybe you're married, but it's not necessary. So some people use the term "partner" when they're talking about who they're married to, and other people use the word "partner" and they're not married, so it can mean married or not. We can also use "partner"... It's genderless, meaning we don't know if the partner refers to a man, a woman, or a different gender. We also don't know if the person is in a same-sex relationship, or a gay or lesbian relationship, or if they're in a heterosexual or a straight relationship. So, the word "partner" is... It's different than the more traditional terms because there's a lot of information that people might not want to share, so they might use the word "partner" instead. Or maybe "husband" and "wife", those terms don't apply, so they like the word "partner". You might also hear somebody talk about their "life partner", which is another way to say "partner" or their "domestic partner". […]
Take the Present Perfect Progressive challenge! Take the Present Perfect Progressive challenge!
2 years ago En
Will you be able to pass my Present Perfect Progressive Challenge?! In this lesson, you will review the grammatical structure of the present perfect progressive tense and learn how to use it in conversation. You'll hear many examples taken from real English conversations and I'll explain how and when you should use this tense. Here is the challenge: First, watch this video. Second, take the quiz to make sure you're using the tense correctly. Third, use the present perfect progressive tense in conversation or in our comments section. Complete this challenge and you'll become more comfortable USING the grammar you learn. Good luck! Practice makes perfect! TAKE THE QUIZ ON MY WEBSITE: https://www.engvid.com/present-perfect-progressive-challenge/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video we are going to talk about grammar, and specifically we are going to talk about the present perfect progressive, and this video is a bit special because in this video I am going to challenge you to use the present perfect progressive in a sentence or in a conversation this week. Okay? So, maybe you've heard of the Ice Bucket Challenge, well, this isn't that. This is the: "Present Perfect Progressive Challenge". Okay? And I hope you do this. So, here's the challenge: Use present perfect progressive tense in one conversation this week. So, in order to do this, first I'm going to teach you: What is the present perfect progressive? We can also call it the present perfect continuous, you might know it by that name. So I'm going to talk about what it is, why we use it. I'm going to teach you about the form of it, so: How does it look? And then we're going to practice it and we're going to talk about how we can actually use this in a conversation. Because I know what happens with many students, they go to class or, you know, they're studying online and they find these great grammar worksheets or resources, and they do them at home and it's great on paper, but then when they're actually in a conversation they get scared about making a mistake or they can't remember the grammar, and so they don't use it. So this video is more practical because I want you to use this grammar. Okay, so let's look at some examples of the present perfect continuous or present perfect progressive. That's going to get tiring to say. It's such a long grammatical term, so if I make a mistake, you know, when I'm saying the word, don't mind that. Okay, so I have some examples here. My first one: "I have"-so this is part of the form-"been working at my company for 5 years". So, just take a moment to think about that. "I have been working at my company for 5 years." Now, let's look at another example. We're going to compare some examples, and then think about what they all mean. "He has been dating my friend for 2 months. He has been dating my friend for 2 months." Let's look at a third example: "We have been studying English forever." [Laughs] Sometimes it might feel that way, but you know, bear with me. "We have been studying English forever." Okay, so what do these sentences have in common? Well, first of all you probably realize these are all present perfect progressive sentences, and they have a lot of things in common. The main thing that we're using the present perfect progressive for is we're talking about how long, so how long something is happening. Okay? So we're talking about the duration of time, how long something happens for. So you'll notice: "I have been working at my company for 5 years." Five years is an amount of time. Okay? "He has been dating my friend for 2 months." Two months is a period of time. "We have been studying English forever." Forever is a very long period of time. Okay? So we're talking about periods of time when we're talking about the present perfect progressive, and we're really answering the question: "How long?" or "How much time?" Okay? So now let's talk a little bit more about the meaning and the form. Okay, so we've looked at some examples of the present perfect progressive, and let's think a little bit more about the meaning. I've drawn here a timeline. Okay? So this is now, today, right now; this is the future; and this is the past. Okay? So when we're talking about the... Well, actually any grammar, what can be really helpful is looking at timelines, they can really help you understand, you know, what these different tenses mean. So let's look at our timeline and what the present perfect progressive tense would look like on the timeline. So, I have here my first example: "I have been working at my company for 5 years." This means that five years ago, so let's go to the past-one, two, three, four, five-I started working, so this is the beginning, and this action continued and continued and continued to right now, so I'm still doing it.
Learn English with Emma: vocabulary, culture, and the first conditional! Learn English with Emma: vocabulary, culture, and the first conditional!
2 years ago En
I will use one topic to teach you important English grammar (the first conditional), as well as vocabulary. You'll also learn a lot about North American culture. I'll teach you all this stuff by talking about superstitions. Is the number 13 bad luck in your culture? If you break a mirror, will you have bad luck? If you find a penny on the ground, do you think you will have a good day? Every culture has beliefs about luck. We call these beliefs superstitions. Some superstitions are common around the world, but many are very specific to a particular country or culture. My mom is really superstitious, so I grew up with a lot of these beliefs. In this video, I'll give you some examples of common North American superstitions, and in the second half of the video, I'll use this topic to teach you how to use the first conditional in English. Watch this video now. If you don't, your computer might get a virus. Take the quiz! https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-superstitions-first-conditional/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to be talking about three different things. Okay? So, we are going to be learning some new vocabulary that have to do with superstition, and I'll explain what superstitions are; we're going to be learning about culture, and Western culture, and North American culture; as well as grammar, today we are going to be learning about the first conditional. So this is a great video because you are going to be learning a lot by the end of it, hopefully. So, let's get started. First I want to tell you about superstitions. I love the topic of superstitions; I think it's very interesting. So, what a superstition is, is it is a belief, and this belief, it's usually cultural, but it can also be personal. Okay? And this belief is not based in science, so it's not scientific. Oftentimes when we're talking about superstitions we're talking about supernatural things, we're talking about good luck, bad luck, curses, you know, we're talking about things maybe from our culture's history and a different way of seeing the world. So if you're confused about superstitions, don't worry, when I give you examples you will start to really understand what a superstition is. Okay, so let's start off with an example. Imagine this: I took a test and I did really well. I got a very high score on my test. Now, why did I get a high score? Maybe you think: "Oh, you probably studied well." Okay? So that might be kind of a scientific explanation. "Oh, Emma studied, so she did well on her test." Well, maybe I brought a pen to the test and it's a very lucky pen or a very lucky pencil, and I think anytime I use this pen or pencil I'm going to do well. It's my lucky charm, it's my lucky pen or pencil. If you think I did well on my test because I have a lucky pen, then that would be an example of a superstition. It's like a ritual you do to get good luck or to keep bad luck from happening, and it's a belief about these types of things. Okay? So, if for example, I say: "I did great on my test because I brought a lucky pen to class.", "I did really well on my test because it was, you know, at 7pm and 7 is a lucky number so therefore, you know, 7pm means I'm going to do well on my test. And I wore green, and green's a lucky colour, so all these reasons helped me on my test", you would say I'm superstitious. Okay? So, "superstition" is a belief, it's a cultural belief that explains something in the world, but not based in science. A person is "superstitious". We use "superstitious" to describe people. My mother is the most superstitious person I know. She is very superstitious. In our house there are many superstitions. Okay? And that's true. I grew up in a very superstitious household. So let's look at some Western superstitions I grew up with. These are the ones that were in my own experience and my own culture. So, one example of a superstition is if you walk under a ladder, this is very bad luck. Okay? So when I walk down the street, if I see a ladder, I never walk under it because I'm also very superstitious. If you find a penny, so a penny is a type of... It's a type of currency or a type of... It's a form of money, it's a coin, and if you find a penny... If I ever find a penny, I always pick it up. Okay? I pick it up off the ground because I think the penny will give me good luck. Okay? A little crazy, I know, but a lot of people in North America do this. 13 is considered a very unlucky number. In Western culture you'll notice a lot of apartment buildings do not have a 13th floor, and that's because people think it's so... They think it's very unlucky, so they don't want to live on the 13th floor because they think they will, you know, have bad luck. I know in China the number 4 is very unlucky, and so it's the same thing. In China you don't see... In apartment buildings you usually don't see a 4th floor because it's very unlucky. Okay, so we've talked about some good luck and some bad luck.
Learn English: 11 ‘mind’ expressions Learn English: 11 ‘mind’ expressions
2 years ago En
Did you know that there are A LOT of expressions in English with the word "mind" in them? "Mind" is a very common word with several different meanings. In this video, I will teach you the three main ways in which "mind" is used in expressions, and then I'll give you 11 very common expressions using the word. The expressions I'll teach you include: Do you mind?, Would you mind?, What's on your mind?, my mind went blank, mind the gap, have someone in mind, give a piece of my mind, lose one's mind, cross one's mind, make up one's mind, and keep in mind. By learning these expressions, you will improve both your listening and speaking. TEST YOURSELF WITH THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/11-mind-expressions/ Hello. My name is Emma and in today's lesson I am going to teach you a bunch of new vocabulary expressions. These expressions are all very common and very useful. So, the expressions we're going to learn today all have the word "mind" in them. Okay? And there are a lot. I'm not even covering all of them because there are so many expressions in English with the word "mind", so we're only going to cover some of them, but we're going to cover the main ones. Okay, so, when we talk about "mind", there are different ways we're talking about mind. "Mind" can have to do with the brain and with thinking or thoughts. Okay? So, sometimes when we're talking about mind we're talking about our brain or we're talking about our thoughts. Sometimes we're talking about something totally different with mind. Sometimes when we're talking about mind we're actually talking about being polite. For example: "Do you mind?" this is something where you're being polite. And then we also use "mind" when we're telling somebody to pay attention to something. For example: "Mind the gap" or "Mind the hole". So we have these three times where we're using "mind" and we have a lot of different expressions for each of these different categories. So we're going to go over each of these. I'm going to teach you a bunch of expressions where "mind" has to do with thought or brain, I'll teach you a lot of expressions where it has to do with politeness, and then I'm going to teach you a lot of "mind" expressions that have to do with paying attention. But this is pretty much one way you can look at these expressions. So let's get started by talking about... When we're talking about mind, and thoughts, and the brain. So, first, when we talk about "mind" one meaning of "mind" can have to do with pretty much the brain, but it's not exactly the brain. Okay? So your brain is in your head and it's a physical thing. You can touch the brain, you can feel the brain, you can see the brain, smell the brain, so it's physical. Mind is not physical. You can't see the mind because the mind is where your thoughts are, where your memories are, and these are things you can't really see or feel, but they're somewhere in here; we just can't see them because they're not physical. So, for example: Einstein, very famous scientist: "Einstein had a brilliant mind." Okay? So this means Einstein had brilliant thoughts, he was very smart. He had, you know, brilliant ideas. These things are all in his mind. So it's similar to brain, although not exactly the same thing, it's very similar to brain. We can also say: "psychologist". A psychologist is a job and people who are psychologists, they study the human mind, meaning they look at the brain and they look at people's memories, they look at the way people have ideas, and they think about: "Where do these things come from?" Okay? So they study the human mind. So, a lot of the times when we use the word "mind", we're talking about kind of your brain and your thoughts. You know, we might say: "Oh, Beethoven had an incredible mind", or you know: "In your opinion, which minds were the greatest of the 20th century? Who had the greatest mind?" Meaning: Who had the greatest ideas, and thoughts, and pretty much brain? Okay, so that's "mind". Now, let's look at another way we use "mind" and that's in the expression: "on someone's mind". So this is a very common expression. In English we often ask: "What's on your mind?" Or we also say: "I have a lot on my mind." So, what does: "on my mind" mean? And make sure you have "on someone's mind", so it can be: "on my mind", "on your mind", "on her mind", "on John's mind", you can pretty much put any person here. What does it mean? Well, when we talk about "on our mind" we're usually talking about problems, so we're usually talking about problems that we are thinking about. These are thoughts, we're thinking about something so it's on our mind.
Learn English: “How come?” Learn English: “How come?”
3 years ago En
“How come?” is a very, very common English expression that is important to learn. It is used all the time, but many textbooks and teachers don't teach it, because it is informal. In this simple video, I will teach you what “how come” means, how to use it, and when to use it. After watching, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/how-come/ to make sure you've got it! TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you a very important expression for conversation. That expression is: "How come?" It's a very popular expression you may see in movies, on TV, or in conversation with English speakers. But it's a very good one to know because we do use it a lot. So, what does "How come?" mean? Okay, well, first I have a question for you. I have here two sentences. "Why did you miss your plane?" and "How come you missed your plane?" What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? Maybe you already know. Okay? So take a guess. The difference in meaning is actually they mean the same thing. "How come?" is another way to say "Why?". It's just a little bit more informal. Okay? So if you're writing, you're going to use "Why?", but if you're speaking you can use both. Okay? "How come?" is informal, it's an informal way to say "Why?" And so, by informal, I mean you use it with your friends, with, you know, people you're talking to on the street, but you wouldn't use it in an essay. Okay? Or for school. Okay, so: "How come?" means: "Why?" So, when we're asking: "How come?" what we're asking about is... we want to know why something happened or the reasons why something happened. Okay? So, for example: "How come you missed your plane?" You know, a reason might be: "Oh, I was late getting to the airport" or "I slept in." Okay? So these would be the answers to a question like: "How come?" So, a lot of the time, teachers will ask this question. "You were late for class today. How come?" That means the teacher wants to know why you were late for class. So now let's look at the grammar of "How come?" and how we can use it in a sentence. Okay, so again, "How come?" is an informal way to say: "Why?" So, we often use it in conversation. Now let's look at the grammar of "How come?" and how we make a sentence with "How come?" So, I have here: "How come", which is at the beginning, and then we have plus the subject. A subject is... It can be: "I", "you", "he", "she", "they", "we", or it can also be a thing, a place, or a person, but it's the doer of a sentence. Then we have the verb. So, for example: "play", "take", "listen", "sing", "eat", these are all verbs. And then finally we have an object, which comes after the verb in regular English sentences and usually those can be people, they can be places, they can be things, so these are the objects. If this is confusing, let's look at some examples, maybe that will help. So, for example: "How come you"-is the subject-"take"-is the verb, and the object is-"the bus"? "How come you take the bus?" This means the same thing as: "Why do you take the bus?" So, here I actually have this written: "Why do you take the bus?" And you'll actually notice "How come" is easier in terms of grammar than "Why". If you look here: "Why do you take the bus?" you have this word, here: "do". Okay? In other sentences we say: "Why does he" or "Why didn't he", but there's always something like: "do", "does", "did", "didn't" here with "Why". And a lot of students forget to put this here. A lot of students will say: "Why you take the bus?" But this is not correct English. For "Why" we always need something here. Now, the nice thing about "How come" is you don't need this. Okay? If you look at "How come", if you can make an English sentence: "you take the bus", you can change this into "Why" just by adding "How come". So, the structure of this is just like a regular English sentence. We have the subject, the verb, and the object, and then we just add "How come" at the front of it. So let's look at another example: "How come Toronto isn't the capital of Canada?" So, again, we have: "How come", we have "Toronto" which is the subject, we have "isn't" which is the verb, and we have "the capital", which is the object. So, if you want to make a regular sentence, I would just say: "Toronto isn't the capital", we can just add "How come" to this, and then it becomes a question, meaning: "Why isn't Toronto the capital?" "How come John didn't come?" Okay? So here we have "How come" at the beginning, "John" which is the subject, and "didn't come", because it's negative form we have "didn't" here, so this is the past, past tense. "Didn't come" is the verb. Okay? This sentence doesn't have an object. Not all sentences in English need objects. The main thing is that you have a subject and a verb. Okay, so that might be a little confusing for you.
Learn 14 GO Expressions in English Learn 14 GO Expressions in English
3 years ago En
How's it going? What's going on? There we go! What do these expressions have in common? They all have the word "go" in them. These expressions are especially useful for conversation. Sometimes we can use "go" to indicate changes, like with "go grey" and "go mad". In many other cases we use "go" in set expressions such as "go for it" and "here we go again!". In this video, you'll learn the following expressions: "How's it going", "how you going", "what's going on", "it's going well", "something is going on", "go crazy", "go bald", "there you go", "there we go", "here you go", "here we go again", "go for it", "way to go", and "go out of your way". Who knew there were so many "go" expressions in English? Try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/learn-14-go-expressions-in-english/ to practice these important expressions. and improve your English speaking. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you some very important conversational English. I'm going to teach you some expressions we use a lot, and all of these expressions have one thing in common: They all use the word "go". So, "go" is one of the first words you probably will learn in English. We use it when we talk about going to a different place, so for example: I go to school or I go to the park. So, we have "go" and it has that meaning, but it also can have a lot of other meanings in English, and those are the ones we're going to look at today. So, again, we use it a lot in conversation. So let's get started with some of the most basic ways we use "go" in conversation. So I have here the question. One of the first questions you ask a person when you meet them or when you see them, and that is: "How are you?" We often use "go" in a way that means the same thing as this, so we often say: "How's it going?" "How's it going?" means the same thing as: "How are you?" Notice that there is an apostrophe and an "s". This actually is: "How is it going?" but we like to use a contraction in conversation. It's a little bit more informal, so we would probably use this with maybe our friends or our family, or you know, somebody we meet but maybe not in a job interview. Okay? So we use this a lot: "How's it going?" If you are in Australia, you might see: "How you going?" We would not say this in North America, I don't think we say this in England, but in Australia you will often hear people say: "How you going?" and that means the same thing as: "How are you?" Okay? I was very confused when I went to Australia. I thought that, you know, people were making grammar mistakes, but it turns out that this is actually a very common way in Australia to say: "How are you?" Another thing we can use with "go" is if we want to find out how something specific, you know, how is something. So, for example, maybe your friend has just started taking some new classes, you might say to them: "How are your classes going?" or "How is your job going?", "How...?" You know, if you're talking about the past: "How did the interview go?" So we often use "how" with, you know, some event or situation, and "going" to ask how did it... Like, you know, how... How it was. Okay? And you'll see this a lot. Okay, so these are some of the ways we use "go" when we're talking about how someone is, and we will come back to this one, but let's talk about some of the responses first. When somebody says: "How are you?" you often respond with: "I'm fine." So it's the same thing with when somebody asks you: "How's it going?" You can say: "I'm fine", but you can also use "go" in your response, so you can say: -"How's it going?" -"It's going well." or "It's going good." I know that's not, you know, great grammar, but we do use "good" a lot when people ask us how we're doing, like, in conversational English, not in written English. But yeah: "It's going well", "It's going good", "It's going amazing", "It's going terrible". Okay? So you can use different adjectives here to describe how you're feeling or how your day is going. You know, you can also just talk generally. You can say: "It's" or you can also say: "Everything" or "Things". There are many variations of this. You might say: -"How's it going?" -"Everything is going amazing." or: "Things are great.", "Things are going good." Okay? So there's a lot of variation. If somebody asks you how, you know: "How are your classes going?" or "How is...? How is work going?" your answer could also be: "My classes are going great.", "Work is going great." You know: "School is going amazing." Or maybe, you know: "School's going terrible." Okay? So you can use this in a lot of different ways. We also have this question which people sometimes ask when, you know, they see you and, you know, maybe it's your friend and they're meeting you, they might say: "Hey. What's going on?" Okay? So: "What's going on?" This one you've got to be careful with, because: "What's going on?" can have multiple meanings, and it all depends on the way you say it.
Say what you mean! Simple English words that learners often say incorrectly Say what you mean! Simple English words that learners often say incorrectly
3 years ago En
Are you pronouncing the words "man" and "men" correctly? How about "word" and "world"? In this video, I will teach the pronunciation of words that are often mispronounced and confused with each other. The words I will cover in this video are "word and "world"; "walk" and "work"; "bird" and "beard"; "man" and "men"; and "woman" and "women". Watch this video for pronunciation tips on how to say these words like a native English speaker. Try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/simple-english-words-learners-say-incorrectly/ to practice what you've learned. TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to improve your pronunciation by looking at pronunciation problems. A lot of students confuse words; or sometimes two words, they sound similar, and students confuse the pronunciation of those words. Okay? So in this video we're going to look at five different sets of words, and I'm going to explain how to pronounce them, and: What are the differences in their pronunciation? So let's get started. The first word that I want to practice is the difference between "word" and "world". Okay? I know a lot of students have a lot of difficulty, especially with "world" because you have the "r" and the "l", which is really challenging for a lot of students. So let's learn how to pronounce these two different words. With "word", I've written here the International Phonetic Alphabet spelling. If you know this, great; if you don't, don't worry about it. This is just, if you do know this, this is how the word is in the IPA alphabet, the International Phonetic Alphabet. So if you want to pronounce this word, the first thing I want you to do is make an "er" sound. Can you do that? "Er". "Er", kind of like: "her", "er". Okay? Now what I want you to do is say the word: "were", "were", "they were", okay? Now, if we add a "d" here: "werd", "werd". Okay? Can you say that? "Werd". One thing that can help you sometimes is with rhymes. If you know something that rhymes with the word it can also help you with the pronunciation. So this is the past tense of "hear": "I heard". Can you say the word: "heard"? "Heard". "I heard the word". So you see these have the same sound: "word", "heard". So the very basic part of this is if you can make the "er" sound, that's the very basic part of it: "er", "word". This is also a kind of short sound: "word". Now, I want you to compare that to this sound: "world". Okay? This sound is a little bit longer for this word. "World". So I have it here in the IPA or the International Phonetic Alphabet. Now, again, these two have the same vowel sound: "er", so I want you to start with the pronunciation of this word by making this sound: "er", "er". Okay? Now, again, I want you to make the sound: "were", "were", "they were". Okay, now here's where it might get a bit tricky for some of you because of the "l", I want you to add an "l" to this sound. "Werl", "werl". Okay? And at the very end, your tongue when you make the "l" should be touching the roof of your mouth: "werl". Okay. Now we're going to add the "d": "werld", "werld". Okay? So now let's compare these two. I want you to say after me: "word", "world", "word", "world". Do you hear the difference? Okay. So this is something you can practice. Again, start with the "er" sound, that will really help you in the pronunciation of this. Now let's look at some other words that are commonly confused. Okay, so the next sounds or words that are very commonly confused in their pronunciation are the words: "walk" and "work". Okay? Many students pronounce these as the same, but they're quite different. So let's look at "walk" first. Okay? So, again, I've written the International Phonetic Alphabet, if you know it; and if you don't know it, that's totally fine, you don't need to know it for this lesson. This is just if you know it. So, one of the main mistakes people make with the word "walk" is with the "l". Okay? Some students, they try to pronounce the "l" and they'll say: "wallk". The "l" is silent; we do not say the "l" at all. Okay? So, imagine this is the word "walk"... Well, it is the word "walk". I'm just going to remove that. So, it looks more like: "w-a-k", "wak". Okay, so the first sound I want to practice is the vowel sound because this is where a lot of students have problems, is with the vowel sound. It's an "aw" sound, okay? So, I want you to remember when you last went to your doctor. Okay? So imagine you're at the doctor's and they want to look inside your mouth, you have to make a sound, you say: "Aw". Right? When you go to the doctor's you say: "Aw". I want you to make that sound: "Aw", "aw". Okay? Notice my mouth is very open for this sound. It's not closed. It's: "aw". Okay, so you need to make that sound to make this word. Now I want you to say: "wa", "wa". All right? It's not a relaxed sound. Your mouth is very... It feels like you're doing work with it: "wa", "wa"
How SENTENCE STRESS changes meaning in English How SENTENCE STRESS changes meaning in English
3 years ago En
What is sentence stress? How does it change the meaning of a sentence? In this video, I will teach you how saying a word louder and longer in a sentence can change the sentence's meaning. Many English learners don't listen for sentence stress and as a result, they don't fully understand what someone is saying. I will teach you how to recognize sentence stress and how it can change meaning. Then we will practice listening to sentences with different word stress and examine their meanings together. I'll share many examples so you'll be able to hear how native speakers use sentence stress, and how you can do it too! At the end of this video, you can practice more with our quiz at https://www.engvid.com/sentence-stress-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you how to become a better listener, and I'm going to do that by teaching you about something called "Sentence Stress". Okay? So I want you to think about the times you've listened to English, maybe in a movie, maybe you saw a movie, or maybe a TV show - was there ever a time where you didn't understand something? Maybe everybody laughed, maybe somebody suddenly got angry and you felt like you missed some of the meaning to why something happened. It might be because you're not listening enough to sentence stress. So, what is sentence stress? Well, let me show you. When we talk about stress in language, we're talking about making something louder and longer. Okay? So, for example, if I say the number "thirteen" versus "thirteen", even though they sound similar, they're different because I've put a different stress or a different emphasis on each part of the word. So this is in part a pronunciation lesson, but also really about listening and how to listen better. So I have here a sentence: "I love studying English." Now, it seems like a pretty straightforward sentence, but I can actually change the meaning of this sentence using sentence stress. Okay? So, by saying different parts of the sentence louder and longer I can actually change the meaning. So I'm going to give you an example. "I love studying English." What part did I say louder and longer? If you said: "I", you're correct, so I'm going to put a mark here to show sentence stress. "I love studying English." If you heard somebody say this it means that I love studying English, but my friend doesn't. Or I love studying English, but other people hate studying English. So I'm really emphasizing that I am, you know, maybe one of the only people. Okay? So, I love studying English. Now, this is a bit of a different meaning than if we move the stress-so I'll just erase that-to the word "love". Okay? So I want you to listen to how I say this: "I love studying English." So in this case "love" is the part I'm saying louder and longer. Okay? And now it has a different meaning. Even though it's the same sentence, just by saying a different part louder and longer I've changed the meaning. So: "I love studying English." What does that mean? If I'm focused on the word "love" it means I really want to emphasize that I don't just like English, I love English. English is my passion. I love it. I really, really, really like it a lot. Okay? Now, if we take the stress here and we move it to "studying": "I love studying English", okay? So now you hear "studying" is louder and longer, again, now we have a different meaning from when I said: "I love studying English", "I love studying English", "I love studying English", each of these means a different thing. "I love studying English" means I only love studying English. I'm emphasizing maybe I don't like using English, maybe I don't like, you know, English in conversation. Maybe I only like reading my book about English, but I don't actually like using it. Okay? Now, if we change the stress to "English" and now "English" is going to be louder and longer... Okay? So, for example: "I love studying English", "English" is louder and longer, now this has a new meaning, a fourth meaning. "I love studying English" means only English. Maybe I hate all other languages. I don't like studying French, I don't like studying Portuguese, I don't like studying Arabic. I only like studying English. Okay? So, as you can see, the way we pronounce these sentences adds meaning to them. It's not just the words that have meaning, it's also the way we use our voice, our intonation. Okay, so we're going to do some practice listening. I'm going to say a sentence and you're going to first listen to: What part of the sentence has the stress? What part of the stress is louder and longer? Okay? So let's do that with the next sentence first. Okay? "I like your painting. I like your painting." What part was the loud part? What part was the long part? "I like your painting." If you said: "your", you are correct. This part has the stress. Now, I have three different meanings that this sentence could mean. It could mean it's an okay painting. Okay?
Stop procrastinating and start learning! Stop procrastinating and start learning!
3 years ago En
Do spend time on Facebook or Instagram when you should be studying? Do you clean your desk when you have a test the next day? Do you get distracted when you have something important to do? Most people have a hard time concentrating and focusing on their work and studies. This leads to stress and a lot of wasted time. In this video, I'll talk about what causes procrastination, and share the best scientific research on how to overcome it. If you learn even one thing from this video, you'll become a better learner and get so much more done. I've been using these tips in my own life, and want to share these secrets for success! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/stop-procrastinating-start-learning/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and I have a question for you. I want you to imagine this. Imagine you have a big English test that's going to happen very soon. What do you do? Okay? And I want you to be honest. Do you open up your book and study right away, and every day study for your test? Do you think about your test, feel a little bit sad and maybe go on Facebook? Do you, instead of studying, text your friends? Or do you think about studying, but instead just watch TV? Okay, a lot of students will say that they open up their book and study, but in reality a lot of people don't do this. A lot of people before tests or presentations or work get really, really nervous, and they do something different. Okay? They don't want to do the studying, they don't want to do the hard work, they're really afraid to do it so instead they do something like go on Facebook, call their friends, go to the mall. Okay? These are all examples, two, three, and four that is... These three are examples of procrastination. Okay? So, "procrastination" is maybe a new word for you, but it's a very, very important word if you are a student or, you know, even if you work. It's actually an important word for everybody because most people procrastinate. So what does procrastination mean? Well, it's when you have something you have to do, but instead of doing what you have to do, you do something else that's more fun, and you keep thinking: "I'll come back to this", but you're very busy with these other things. So let's look at some examples of the word procrastination. We have it as a verb, an action: "I am procrastinating." Because I'm not studying, I'm on Facebook, I'm procrastinating. "I'm not studying. I procrastinate a lot." Here we have another verb form. Okay? "I procrastinate a lot", which means: I don't study, I don't do my English homework; instead, I spend a lot of time texting my friends and doing anything but English. I can also use it as a noun: "My procrastination is really bad." Okay? My procrastination is bad. I have a problem with procrastination. So this means I have a problem getting stuff done because I don't really want to do it, I'd rather focus on doing Facebook or something else. Or we can also have it as a noun to say what we are. "I'm a procrastinator." A procrastinator is a person. Okay? So I'm a teacher, that's a person. When I was in university sometimes I was a procrastinator. This means before any big test or presentation I'd start working on it, and then I'd do something else because I'm a procrastinator. Okay? So let's... We're going to talk about why people procrastinate, and then we're going to talk about how to fight procrastination. Okay? Because it's something we all need to fight. Okay, so why do people procrastinate? That's a very good question. Okay? So, different people procrastinate for different reasons, but usually a lot of the times people have the same reasons for procrastinating. People procrastinate when they think something is difficult. Okay? So for me I find math difficult, so when I used to do math I would procrastinate and I would do something else like, you know, make a sandwich or clean my room even because the math seemed so difficult to me, anything was better than doing the math. So I would always get distracted. A lot of people find English grammar difficult, and when they're studying grammar a lot of the times they procrastinate, they text their friends or they, you know, do anything but grammar. Boring. A lot of people procrastinate when something is boring. They don't want to do it because it's... You know, they want to do something interesting. People procrastinate when something is a lot of work. Okay? And they know it's a lot of work, so they look at the task and it's just too much, so then they want to feel good, so they do something else. A lot of people also procrastinate just because they're scared or they're afraid. They want to do something well, and they don't think that they can so it well, so you know... Or, you know, they're worried about making mistakes, so a lot of the times people procrastinate because of fear.
Have better conversations using the FORD method Have better conversations using the FORD method
3 years ago En
Don't know what to talk about with someone? Do you hate uncomfortable silence? Want to become a better conversationalist? In this video, I will teach you the FORD method of conversation. "FORD" stands for Family, Occupation, Recreation, and Dreams. These are perfect topics for conversing with anyone, including people you don't know very well. I will give you many examples of FORD questions to ask. You can use these questions to keep a conversation going and connect with people. FORD is a great tool for anyone who wants to improve their small talk skills and become more likeable. https://www.engvid.com/ford-method-small-talk/ TRANSCRIPT ello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to be better at conversation and speaking. Okay? So, in this video I'm going to teach you about how to become better at conversation with a technique. We call the technique "F-O-R-D" or "FORD". This technique will really help you if you're shy, if when you meet people for the first time you don't know what to say, if you feel very uncomfortable at parties or in meetings or any social events. This is a great technique. Even if you're amazing at socializing, this video can still really help you even improve more than what you already can do. So let's get started. Okay, so the first thing I want to talk about is we use FORD as a way of small talk. So, what is small talk? Okay? Small talk is the type of conversation we have with people we don't know well or strangers. So, you might make small talk with your neighbours, you might make small talk with your boss, with your colleagues, maybe if you're, you know, going to a coffee shop you might make small talk with the store clerk. So, you make small talk with people you don't know well and it's just a way to make people feel comfortable in conversation and to create a connection with people. A lot of conversation is small talk. If anyone has ever talked to you about the weather, sports, you know, all sorts of different topics - these are usually small talk topics. So, again, you might make small talk at parties, in elevators, at meetings, even if you're taking English classes you will probably make small talk there as well. So, how do we get good at small talk? What do we talk about when we don't know what to talk about? Well, that's where FORD comes in. FORD is a technique which will help you know what to talk about when you really have no idea. So maybe this has been you before. Okay? Maybe this is you: "What should I talk about? Ah." Or, you know, maybe it's just a bunch of question marks. "I don't know what to say." It's totally silent. It's awkward. So, how can we fix this situation? Well, FORD stands for four things. "F" stands for "family". You can talk about family, and I'm going to give you some great questions you can use to ask about somebody's family. "O" stands for "occupation" or job. I'm going to give you some great questions about occupation that you can ask somebody you don't know well to keep the conversation going. "R" stands for "recreation", this is like hobbies, sports, movies, Netflix, TV. Okay? So I'm going to give you some great questions for hobbies or recreation. And finally, "D" stands for "dreams". This is when you ask somebody about their future goals or, you know, something they want to do. This does not... Dreams does not mean when you go to sleep, if you have some weird dream and you share it with somebody. I'm not talking about that. I'm talking about your dreams in life. What are your goals? Okay? So using the FORD technique will make you better at small talk. So, now let's look at some specific questions you can ask when you're socializing with somebody who you don't know that well. Okay, so again, the "F" in FORD stands for "family". Family is a great thing to talk about, but remember to keep it light and easy. Okay? You want to talk about things people are comfortable with. So don't ask them any private questions, you know, like: "Oh, is it true so-and-so cheated on so-and-so?" No, no, no. Keep it light, simple, and easy. And also share about your own family, too. Okay? That's also very important. You don't want to sound like the FBI interrogating somebody. You want to have a conversation, so each time they say something, you can say something about yourself. So keep it kind of balanced. Okay, so one easy question you can talk about: "Where are you from originally?" Okay? "Where are you from? Are you from Toronto? Are you from Tokyo? Are you from Istanbul? Where are you from?" This question is great because you can really talk about the difference between your cities and, you know, maybe some of your experiences growing up. Similarly: "Where did you grow up?" A lot of people have moved a lot, so maybe they were born in this city, then they moved to Mexico, and then they moved here. So that's also another interesting question.
15 ways to improve your English pronunciation 15 ways to improve your English pronunciation
3 years ago En
Problems with your English pronunciation? In this lesson, I will give you lots of advice, practical tips, and resources to help you improve. After watching this video, you will have a deeper understanding of what is important for proper English pronunciation. I will teach you proven methods to become a better English speaker. https://www.engvid.com/15-ways-to-improve-your-english-pronunciation/
Get a better job: Power Verbs for Resume Writing Get a better job: Power Verbs for Resume Writing
3 years ago En
Need to find a job? Writing a resume? Then you need to know about power verbs. These verbs will improve your resume and make you appear more professional. In this lesson, You will learn what power verbs are and how we use them in resumes. You will also see many examples of common power verbs, and I'll give you some of my best tips on resume writing in general. I will also teach you about weaker verbs like "did" and "make", which should often be avoided on resumes. After watching this video, you can take my quiz on power verbs and check out our helpful power verb resource page, which lists many common power verbs for different jobs. Good luck with your job hunt! CHECK THE RESOURCE PAGE WITH LOTS OF POWER VERBS YOU CAN USE: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/power-verbs-in-english/ TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/power-verbs-resume-writing/ TRANSCRIPT: Coming soon!
English Phrasal Verbs for LOVE, SEX, and DATING! English Phrasal Verbs for LOVE, SEX, and DATING!
3 years ago En
Are you looking for love? Or maybe you're already in a relationship and want to talk about it? In this video, you will learn common English phrasal verbs we use when we are talking about love and dating. You will learn phrasal verbs that have to do with relationships and romance. Use these with that special boy or girl that you like! It will also help you to understand conversations that you hear in TV shows and movies. You will learn expressions like: "go out", "check out", "hit on", "make out", "cheat on", and many more! Try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-phrasal-verbs-love-sex-dating/ to practice what you learned in this video. Good luck! TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video we are talking about love and dating. I'm going to teach you some very good vocabulary you can use when you're talking about boyfriends, girlfriends, people you like. You will see these words maybe on TV, in movies, especially if you like romantic comedies, these words come out... Up a lot. So, specifically, what I am going to teach you is phrasal verbs that have to do with love, as well as dating. Okay? So you might be wondering: "What is a phrasal verb?" Good question. So, if you know what a verb is, a verb is an action. Okay? So some examples of verbs are: "play", "listen", "look", "eat". These are all different verbs. A phrasal verb is a little bit different. The reason a phrasal verb is different is because you have the verb and a preposition. Okay? So what's a preposition? A preposition is a word like: "on", "off", "over", "under", "above", "below", "at", "in". These are all prepositions. Okay? So, the thing about a phrasal verb is when you have a verb... Imagine the verb "get", if we add a preposition to it, it changes the meaning of the verb. So, for example, we have: "get on", "get off", "get over", "get under". Okay? "Get above". We have all these different phrasal verbs with "get" and each one has different meanings, and the meaning is really in the preposition. Okay? So, we have tons of these in English and we use them a lot in conversation. So today we're going to look at some ones that have to do with dating. So, let's give some examples. Okay? I have here: "hit on". "Hit on" is a phrasal verb. We have "hit", which is the verb, and "on" which is the proposition. Okay? So before we continue I just wanted to point out one thing. There are different types of phrasal verbs. So we have phrasal verbs where the verb and the preposition are together, there's nothing in between them. So: "hit on" is an example of this. You see "hit" and "on", they're together. There's nothing in here. There's no person, there's no object. "Hit" and "on", the preposition and the verb are together. Now, there is also a different type of phrasal verb where you have the verb, and then there's something in between the verb, and then there's the preposition. So, for example, another phrasal verb we will look at today: "check out". You have: "Check her out." So you actually have the verb, the preposition, but there is something in between the verb and the preposition. In this case we have a person. In other cases it might be an object. Okay? There's also a third type of phrasal verb where pretty much with the third type you have a choice. You can either put the phrasal verb together or it can be separate. Today, we're mainly, though, looking at either ones that are together like "hit on", or ones that are separated by a person or a thing, such as: "Check her out." If you're a little bit confused, don't worry because we will be looking at so many examples of what I'm talking about today so you will really understand this concept. Okay, so let's look at "hit on" and the meaning of "hit on". So I have here the sentence: "Dave hit on me." Okay? So we have "hit", which is the verb, "on", which is the preposition. They're always together. And what this means is it means Dave said something to me, he told me that I was maybe beautiful or pretty, and maybe he asked me for my phone number. When you hit on somebody, it means that you're showing somebody that you're interested in them. Okay? So if you ever have seen any movies where you have people in bars or at clubs, you... And this can also be for real life, too, you might have a man go up to a woman and hit on her, meaning he says to the woman: "Can I buy you a drink?" Or, you know: "Can I talk to you? I think you're very beautiful." So this is "hit on". It means you're telling somebody or you're showing somebody that you are interested in them. Okay? Okay, the next one I wanted to look at, the next phrasal verb is: "check out". So: "The man checked her out." What does this mean? When somebody checks you out, it means they're looking at you in a certain way. "Check out", when we're talking about dating, really has to do with the eyes.
English Listening Practice: Improve your vocabulary! English Listening Practice: Improve your vocabulary!
3 years ago En
Want to practice your listening and learn some new vocabulary? In this video, you will play an English listening game. First, I will teach you some new vocabulary and review English prepositions which we will use in our fun listening practice. Next, you will listen to me describe a picture and you will draw the picture. At the end of the lesson, you can see how well you listened to my instructions. Are our pictures the same or different? You can listen to this video as many times as you like to get more practice and you can play this listening activity with your friends or classmates. Try my quiz at the end to see how many new words you remember. https://www.engvid.com/english-listening-practice-vocabulary-prepositions/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and today we have a great lesson plan for you. In today's lesson we are going to practice listening. Okay? We're going to practice listening, and we're also going to learn some new words, we're going to learn about shapes, as well as prepositions. Okay? So, in this video you will also get to do a listening activity and I'll explain a little bit about that in a moment. So first we are going to learn shapes, and these are some examples of shapes, then we are going to learn about prepositions. You might be wondering: "What is a preposition?" Well, a preposition is a short word like: "on", "above", "below". And after that we're going to do a listening activity where you're going to listen to me describe shapes and prepositions. For the listening activity you will need two things: A piece of paper and a pencil or a pen. This is an active video so you will actually be doing something while watching. Okay, so let's get started on shapes. So I have here some major shapes in English. We have a triangle, we have a circle, square, a heart, and this one is a star. In our listening activity later, you will be drawing a triangle, a circle, a square, a heart, and a star. Okay? So these are the words we'll be using in this video. We will also be using some prepositions. So a preposition is a short word that shows the relationship between two things. So that's confusing to a lot of students. An easier way I like to think about prepositions is they can... They can describe where something is. Okay? So they often answer the question of: Where? So, for example, I have here our triangle and our circle, and I have the preposition "on". So if we look at this, I could say: "There is a triangle on a circle." So: "There is a triangle on a circle." So we will be using the preposition "on" later in our listening activity. We also have "inside". "There is a triangle inside a circle." Another preposition is "outside". We can say: "There is a triangle outside the circle." So, here, the triangle is inside, whereas here the triangle is outside. So these are very common prepositions we use when describing where something is. Okay, we also have "above". So, "above" is a little bit different than "on". If you notice the circle, the triangle is on the circle, meaning it's touching, whereas when we're looking at "above" it can be touching, but it can also be just above. So it can touch or it can also just be above. So, for example, we have a triangle above a circle. Okay, now we have "below" and "under", two more common prepositions which we usually use in the same way. So we have here the circle. We can say: "There is a circle". Or actually we can say: "There is a triangle below the circle." Or: "There is a triangle under the circle." Okay? And now we have "to the right". We can say: "There is a triangle to the right of the circle." So notice how they're beside? This side is to the right, whereas this side is to the left. So if we look at the triangle, the triangle is beside the circle and it's also to the right of the circle. Now, compare this to "to the left". We have a triangle and a circle, and we can say: "The triangle now is to the left of the circle." Okay? So these two are opposites: "to the right" and "to the left". So these pictures help you understand these prepositions, which answer the question of: Where? So, again, we have: "on", "inside", "outside", "above", "below/under", "to the right", and "to the left". Okay, now, for the listening activity we are about to do, there are three more expressions that you will need. You will need to know: "in the center". Okay? So if I'm looking at this board, about here is in the center. Okay? So I can say: "My finger is in the center of the board." I can also say about corners. We have a corner, a corner, another corner, and another corner. Okay? So those are called corners. If I'm looking at my piece of paper from earlier, we have a corner here, a corner here, a corner here, and a corner here. So, what I can say is... If I ask you to draw something, I might tell you to draw something in the top corner, which might be here.
How to use "ABOUT TO" in English How to use "ABOUT TO" in English
3 years ago En
What you are about to learn will be very useful when speaking English! In this video, we will look at "about to", a term we use when talking about the near future. It describes something someone plans to do very soon. I will teach you when to use "about to" and how to use it correctly. Try my quiz at the end of the lesson to make sure you understand. I hope you are about to click on this video! https://www.engvid.com/about-to/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and I am about to teach you "about to". Okay? So, "about to", what does it mean and how do we use it? Well, let's look at an example to really understand this. "I am about to clean my room." I want you to think for a moment. Do you think this sentence is about the past, the present, or the future? So: "I am about to clean my room." If you said this is about the future, you are correct. We use "about to" when we're talking about something we will do very soon in the future. We're not talking about far in the future. We usually use "will" for that. We're talking about very, very soon like in the next five minutes or in the next couple of minutes. So, I am about to give you some examples of "about to". So we have here "I" as a subject: "I am about to", and then after "about to" we have a verb. I put this in colour to help you remember it better. We have: "You are about to" and the verb. "She or he is about to" and a verb. "We are about to" and a verb. "You guys are about to" and a verb. I've put here: "You guys", which is a bit informal, but when we're talking about a group of people in an informal situation we can use: "You guys", and: "They are about to" with a verb. So what can we do with the verbs here? Well, if you look up here I have: "I am about to clean my room." We keep the verb in the infinitive in this case. "I am about to study English.", "You are about to listen to me speak.", "She is about to watch TV.", "We are about to go to the gym.", "You guys are about to listen to Justin Bieber.", "They are about to take a shower." Okay? So now let's do some together, let's put the verb in the proper form together. Okay, so just to remember: When we're talking about "about to", we're talking about the future and usually we're talking about either the immediate future, meaning the next 5-10 minutes or the next couple of hours or we can also be talking about soon. Soon is different for different people, so I might be talking about in the next couple of days or in the next couple of weeks, but what I really mean is soon. Okay? So I can say: "I am about to go on vacation", and that means soon I will go on vacation. Okay, so now let's do some examples together. "I am about to _________." How can we change this verb into the proper form? "I am about to..." Well, this was a trick question. You said: "call"-and we add a little period here-you are correct. It's very easy to use "about to". We just need the subject, "am", "about to", and the verb. All right, let's look at the next example together. "Ednan is _________ do homework." Now, I want to talk about Ednan in the immediate future, what he's going to do very soon, so what can we put here? If you said: "about to", you are correct. "Ednan is about to do his homework." Okay? Now, let's do one more: "Jess is about to _________." And here we have the verb "study". So, again, very easy. What do we write? "Jess is about to study." Which means she is going to study soon. Okay? I hope you are about to subscribe to my channel. There, you can find a lot of really great resources on all sorts of things English, including conversation, listening, speaking, IELTS. I have covered a lot of topics, so I hope you check that out. I also want to invite you to practice "about to" by visiting our website, www.engvid.com. There, you can actually do a quiz. I hope you're about to do this quiz where you can practice everything you learned today. So until next time, thanks for watching and take care.
Read, Understand, and Remember! Improve your reading skills with the KWL Method Read, Understand, and Remember! Improve your reading skills with the KWL Method
3 years ago En
Is it difficult for you to understand or remember what you read? In this video, I will teach you an easy method that will help you become better at reading difficult material such as textbooks and journal articles. It is known as the "KWL" reading method. You will also remember more of what you read by using this method. If you plan to study at an English school, college, or university, this method will really help you. You can also use this method to help you in the IELTS and TOEFL exams. Try the KWL method yourself and tell me how it works for you in the comments! Take the quiz! https://www.engvid.com/kwl-reading-method/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to be a better reader. So I want you to think about your life. Are there any things that are very difficult for you to read? Maybe you have to read something in English and you really don't understand what's happening in the story. Or maybe you're in university and you're taking a very hard course and you can't read the textbook because it's really difficult and you don't know what's happening. Well, if you're having difficulty reading or even if you just want to remember what you read more and be a better studier, this video is for you. So first let's look at some things students might be reading that might be causing difficulty. Some students in their universities they have to read textbooks. If you go to university or college, or also high school, you have to do a lot of reading and you have to do a lot of complicated reading, especially for sciences, maths, history. So, this is a very good method. I'm going to teach you how to read these books better. Newspapers. Sometimes you'll be reading the newspaper and it's difficult, especially in another language. So if you're reading a newspaper and, you know, you want to be better at reading it, this video is for you. Internet sources. There's a lot of great things on the internet to read, and so this will also help you if you look reading things from the internet. Magazines. Journals, for anyone who's a professional, whether you're a doctor, a nurse, a historian, or if you're in university or college, a lot of the times you have to read something called a journal, which is something for professionals to read about their field. So it's usually modern research. These things can be very difficult to read, so if you're reading these, this is a great technique for you. If you're doing the TOEFL or IELTS. Although I wouldn't recommend using this technique on the actual exam, I think it's great for your practice tests and I'll tell you why a bit later. So you can use this when you're practicing for the TOEFL and IELTS. And finally, if you're reading Shakespeare. When I read Shakespeare I had no idea what was going on. It was very confusing, all of the old English. I found it very difficult to read. There are also a lot of books that can be very, very hard to read. So these techniques will really work for you for any of these situations and many more. So before I teach you about the KWL technique, I just want you to think about reading for a second. Okay? A lot of people when they pick up a book, that's all they do. They open it up and they start reading right away, and then they close the book and then a lot of the times they don't really remember anything they read or they don't understand what they read. So it's a lot of wasted time. I like to think of reading how I think of jogging or running. So if we look here, I have the word "running" or "jogging". If you like exercise, any type of exercise kind of follows this format. So, reading is a lot like running. What a good reader does is they have a warm up period. So if you think about running, before you go running you usually stretch. Maybe you'll do a little bit of movement to get your heart pumped. So you don't just start running. You do a warm up. The same is true with reading. The best reading... The best readers usually do a warm up. For exercise, people then usually run or jog for a certain amount of time, and then afterwards they have what we call a cooldown period. So, "cooldown" is usually when somebody wants to slow their heartrate, so maybe they walk instead of run, maybe they do more stretches, but they don't just stop what they're doing. They slowly, you know, do slower activities before they stop jogging or running. So if you think about reading like exercise, you should also have a warm up, and then you read, and then the cooldown. This is the meat. This is the main idea of the KWL method, and I'm going to teach you exactly how we can do all of this when we read.
IELTS Writing Task 1: How to describe BAR GRAPHS IELTS Writing Task 1: How to describe BAR GRAPHS
3 years ago En
Are you preparing for the writing section of the IELTS? In this lesson, we will look at Writing Task 1, and I will teach you how to describe a bar graph. This is one question type that can be on the IELTS, so it is a good idea to prepare yourself for it. I will take you through what happens in Writing Task 1, what key grammar you can use for it, and how you can improve the organization of your description by using compare-and-contrast vocabulary. Good luck on your exam! Try my quiz at the end to practice some of the concepts from this lesson: https://www.engvid.com/ielts-writing-task-1-bar-graphs/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma and in today's video we're going to talk about the test known as the IELTS. So if you are going to be writing the IELTS, this video is for you. Now, in this video we're talking specifically about if you're writing the academic IELTS. If you're, you know, just here for general interest, you can still learn quite a bit from this video because we will be talking about different vocabulary and grammar. So this video can also help you if you're not taking the IELTS also. Okay, so what are we going to be talking about specifically in this video? Well, if you're taking the IELTS you probably know that there's a writing part of the IELTS. The writing part has two sections, we call them Writing Task 1 and Writing Task 2. In this video I'm going to cover a small bit of Writing Task 1. So, in Writing Task 1 you're going to be given some sort of visual image. Okay? So you might see something like this, this, or this. It might be a chart, it might be a table, but you're going to see some sort of visual and you need to describe what you're seeing. So this video... I've covered different types of Writing Task 1 and I'll talk about the links to some of these other videos at the end, but in this specific video we're going to be talking about bar graphs. Okay? So, first of all: What is a bar graph? Well, so I have here three different types of charts or graphs. We have this one, this one, and this one. This is called a pie chart. Okay? I've covered this in another video, so if you're interested in learning how to write about pie charts, you can check out that video. But you'll notice with a pie chart it looks kind of like a pizza or a pie. It's in a circle and it's... Has different colours representing different percents. We have here, this is called a line graph. So you'll notice that there's a line and, you know, sometimes this represents time, sometimes it represents other things, but with a line graph you'll notice, like, increases and decreases, but it's one connected line. We're not covering either of these in this video. What we're going to be covering is another thing you might see on the IELTS, which is you might be given a picture like this. This is called a bar graph or a bar chart. So we have here these rectangular-shaped things that are each a different colour. These are known as bars. Okay? So, I know a bar is a place you go to buy beer, but in this case a bar is not that, it's actually this kind of rectangle on the chart. So, on the IELTS you may get a picture of something like this. You might actually get a picture of two things together, or you might get a picture of something a lot more complicated than this. In this case we're going to talk about: What would you do and say, and what are some tips if you get a picture of a bar graph or a bar chart? Okay, so what are you going to have to do? Specifically they're going to ask you... After you get a picture like this, they're going to ask you to describe what you see. Okay? So you're describing the main information. You're also going to have to maybe make comparisons, say how things are similar or how things are different, which is contrast. So, for example, if this is, you know, different activities, maybe you might say that the red is shopping and the blue is golfing. In this case, shopping is less popular than golfing. Okay? So pretty much you need to compare the different bars and say: What are the same about them? Which ones are similar and which ones are different? You're also going to have to report any main features or trends. Okay? So maybe you'll see a pattern and you're going to have to write about, you know, some of these main points you see when you look at the visualization. You do not write your opinion. Okay? So if this is a graph on education, maybe this is elementary school, secondary school, university, master's, and like a doctorate or something - you do not write what you think about it. Okay? All you do is in this type of question you're just writing what you see and what it means. You're not writing your opinion on anything. So you should not write the words: "I think" or "In my opinion", you'll actually lose marks for this. So in task 1, no opinion; that's for task 2.
Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 BACK VOWELS Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 BACK VOWELS
3 years ago En
You want to sound like a native speaker, but you don't know how to improve your pronunciation! Here's a little secret: the fastest way to get better pronunciation is to work on your vowel sounds. In this video, I will teach you how to pronounce four vowels that are common in both British and American English. We'll be looking at back vowels. You'll learn by seeing what my mouth, lips, and tongue are doing when I pronounce these vowel sounds, then you'll practice saying them by doing the same with your mouth. Often, English learners don't notice the difference between these sounds, and that might be why you aren't saying them correctly. We'll compare these similar vowel sounds to make those differences clear. I will show you the different spellings of these sounds in English and you will learn what the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols for these vowels are. You should also watch my other video on FRONT VOWEL SOUNDS: https://youtu.be/k98VNRLEisE Those are just as important! http://www.engvid.com/english-pronunciation-5-back-vowels/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to learn about pronunciation, specifically how to pronounce back vowels. Okay? So, whether you are learning British English, Canadian English, American English, whatever English you're learning, these sounds exist in all of them. Okay? So it doesn't matter what type of... What dialect you're learning. You will find these sounds in many different dialects. Okay, so to get started let's talk about: What are vowels? So I have here "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and sometimes "y". These are what we call vowels in English. Okay? So, these make a certain type of sound where usually you... You have a lot of air coming into your mouth from the back of your throat. So it's not so important how... Like, what a vowel is. The main thing is to remember that "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and sometimes "y" are vowels. Whatever is a letter that isn't one of these is called a consonant, so for example: "s", "t", "d", "f". These are all consonants. Okay, so let's get started by looking at this and thinking: What is a consonant and what is a vowel? So we have here the word: "drew". Can you tell me: What is the vowel in this word: "drew"? If you said this, you're correct. Okay? The "d", "r", and the "w", they're consonants, and the "e" is a vowel. We have the word here: "foot". So what's the vowel? In this case it's the o's and "f" and "t" are consonants. "Hello", the "e" is a vowel and so is the "o". "All", in this case the "a" is the vowel. "Jaw", and "clock". Okay, so these are the different vowels in English. Today we are going to be looking at four of the vowel sounds that happen in the back of your mouth. So I'll explain that in a second, but first I want you to look at these four words: "foot", "food", "foe", "flock". What is the same in these words? If you look at the spelling, all these words have an "o" in the spelling. Now, do we pronounce the "oo" the same way? Listen carefully. Is the "o" pronounced the same in each of these words? "Foot", "food", "foe", "flock". The "o" is actually pronounced differently in these words, which is why you can't always depend on spelling in English to help you with your pronunciation. Okay? So I'm going to teach you how to... You know, some tips on how to do these different pronunciations and how to know when to pronounce which sounds. Okay. So, before we get to these different vowel sounds we're going to practice today, I just wanted to tell you some general things about pronouncing vowels. A lot of students, they don't know what they're doing with their mouth when they're pronouncing. It's very important to pay attention to what your mouth is doing and what your tongue is doing when you actually pronounce something. Okay? This will really help you improve your pronunciation. It's also a good idea maybe to use a mirror in order to look and become aware of what this area is doing to make the sound. So, when you're thinking about your lips it's important to think: Are your lips spread, like: "cheese", or are your lips...? So this would be spread. Or are your lips like closer together, like: "food", "oo"? "ee", "oo", notice the difference? So that's one thing to look at: Are your lips spread like "ee" or are they close together like "oo"? Okay. How open is your mouth? Is something you want to look at. Is it not very open, like: "oo"? Or is it very open, like: "ah"? Okay? How open is your mouth? The other thing you want to pay attention to is your tongue. So, these are your lips. I'm not a great artist, I know. These are your teeth, this is your chin, your neck, and this red... Red thing is your tongue. Is your tongue touching your teeth, is your tongue touching the top of your mouth, or is your tongue hanging out kind of close to the back of your mouth?
Improve Your Vocabulary: KNOW, MEET, MEET WITH, or MEET UP? Improve Your Vocabulary: KNOW, MEET, MEET WITH, or MEET UP?
3 years ago En
Do you know the difference between "know" and "meet"? We use these verbs in almost every conversation, so let's make sure you use them correctly! I'll teach you the meaning of "know" and "meet" as well as expressions like "meet with" and "meet up with". Sometimes the difference is between formal and informal English. In other cases, these words and expressions have very different meanings. Try the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/improve-your-vocabulary-know-meet-meet-with-or-meet-up/ to practice what you've learned. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about the difference between "know" and "meet". This is a very common mistake I hear many, many students making. Okay. I'm also going to teach you about the difference between "meet", "meet with", or "meet up with". Okay? And this, in case you're wondering, is the past tense of "meet". Okay? So in this video we're going to talk about: "know", "meet", "meet up with", and "meet with", and: What are the differences between those different words? So let's get started. So I have here four sentences. "I knew Chelsea last week." And "knew" is the past of "know". "I met Chelsea last week." "Met" is the past of "meet". "I met with Chelsea last week." and: "I met up with Chelsea last week." Do you know what the difference between these sentences are? Are there any ones that have a mistake in them or all these all good sentences? Okay, so take a moment and think about it. Okay. So, let's first look at the difference between these two: "I knew Chelsea last week." and "I met Chelsea last week." So I have here some pictures. Pictures can really help you remember things, and they can really, you know, help make a point... A stronger point. So, let's get started over here. We have "meet", which is now and the past, which is "met". I have here two people. These people do not know each other. It's the first time that they are talking. Okay? They don't know each other. So what do they say? They say: "Nice to meet you!" We use "meet" when we're meeting somebody for the first time. We use "meet" with strangers. Okay? So these guys, they don't know each other and now they are meeting for the first time. Okay, so these two, we could say: "They met last week." Meaning: The first time they shook hands: "Hi. Nice to meet you." was last week. Now, compare this to "know" or "knew", which again, is the past tense. We have here two friends. Okay? We can call them David and Ken. They're friends forever. Okay? They've been friends for a very long time. In this case they know each other. They have history. It's not they're meeting for the first time. No. They met a long time ago. So if there's history between two people, they know each other. If there is no history between two people and, you know, it's their first time shaking hands, saying: "Nice to meet you", they meet each other. Okay? So this one we would never say... This is a mistake I hear a lot. A lot of people say: "Oh. It's nice to know you." We don't say that. Okay? Because "know" means you met the person a long time ago and you've... You know, you have a history together. For this, this is the first time, we would use "meet" not "know". Okay? So another thing I wanted to say on this is a lot of the times you want to... You know, you want to talk about how long has somebody been friends with somebody or how long has somebody had this person for their teacher. So the... What we usually use is the present perfect, so we often say how long we've known someone. Okay? So "known" is the past participle of "know". So what you can say if somebody says: -"Oh. How long have you known your husband for?" -"I've known my husband for 10 years." -"How long has Dave known Ken for?" -"Dave has known Ken for five years." Okay? So, again, this is asking about: How long is your history? How long have you known each other for? Again, this is key English. It comes up a lot in conversation. When you meet somebody, you know, and there's like a couple, you often say: "Oh. How long have you known Bob for? How long have you known Jennifer for?" Okay? So now let's look at some of the differences with "met", or, sorry. "Meet", "meet with", and "meet up with". Okay, so quick question to you. We've just gone over the difference between "know" and "met". For these two: "I knew Chelsea last week.", "I met Chelsea last week." which one do you think is correct? Well, if you said number two: "I met Chelsea last week." that's right. Oh, okay. "I met Chelsea last week." This one is correct, because usually you know somebody for a long time and we usually don't use "knew" because it makes it sound like the person has died or that you don't know them anymore. So we usually use "know" or we use "have known".
Real English: Talking about pets and animals Real English: Talking about pets and animals
3 years ago En
Do you like animals? Do you have a pet? Join me and Gizmo and learn to speak about your favorite animals! Asking about pets can be a great conversation starter. So in this lesson, we will answer your most common questions about pets. What do North Americans think of their dogs? What questions can you ask people about their pets? Do we call pets "he", "she", or "it"? What sounds do dogs make? What do we call dog and cat hair? Learn the answers to these questions and many more. Take our quiz to practice what you learned in this useful lesson that will teach you not just English vocabulary, but an important aspect of North American culture! http://www.engvid.com/real-english-talking-about-pets-and-animals/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and this is my friend Gizmo, and today we are going to help you learn English. Today's English is all about dogs. Okay? So, let's ask some questions to Gizmo, and we can get some answers. Our first question: Do we call pets "he", "she", or "it"? What do you think, Gizmo? Usually for pets we like to use "he" or "she". Okay? So you might ask somebody: "What's her name?" or "What's his name?" when you're talking about a dog or a cat. We usually use "it" for wild animals, although sometimes we also use "he" and "she" if we want to personify them. So, majority of the time we use "he" or "she" when we're talking about pets. Okay, question number two: What is pet hair called? Do you know the answer to this one, Gizmo? It is called fur. Okay? F-u-r, fur. As you can see, Gizmo has a lot of fur. We use the word "fur" when we're talking about cat hair, dog hair, hamster hair. It's what we call fur. Okay, our next question: What are pet hands called? Okay, let's show Gizmo's off. So Gizmo, what is this called? This is a paw. So, dogs and cats have paws. I'm just going to put Gizmo down for a second. There you go. Okay, so his hands are called paws. Okay, our next question: What does "canine" mean? "Canine" is another way to say "dog", but "canine" is more scientific sounding. So if you're reading a science book or something that's formal writing, you will probably see the word "canine". It's the science... Scientific word for dog. We also have the word "puppy". What does the word "puppy" mean? "Puppy" means a baby dog. Okay? So, when a dog is very small and very young, usually around, you know, two months to one year, we call it a puppy. For kittens, that's what we call a baby cat, a kitten. Okay, our next question is a very good one: What sound does a dog make? Sounds are very cultural. In different cultures, animals make different sounds. For dogs, in English, dogs can either bark, they can say: "Woof woof", or they can say: "Ruff ruff". Is this different than what dogs say in your language? If you're wondering with cats or with, you know, all sorts of other animals, you can actually check out Ronnie's video which covers a lot of these different animal sounds if you're interested. Okay, finally, our last question for vocabulary: What do you call a dog with no home? So a dog that lives in the streets. We call a dog with no home a stray dog, or we can also say a street dog. So we would say: "That dog has no owner. He's without a family. He's a stray dog." Or: "He is a street dog." So now let's look at some grammar and pronunciation, and cultural tips about talking about dogs. Okay, so our next question is a grammar question, and it's a very important grammar question. Okay, so let me hold Gizmo. Okay. So, Gizmo, you see these two things? "I like dog", "I like dogs". Do you know what the difference between these two sentences are? No? Okay, well, let me tell you. "I like dog" is very different than: "I like dogs". When you want to say you like dogs as in, you know, you think they're really cute and funny, and you enjoy them, you say: "I like dogs" with an "s". This is different from: "I like dog" with no "s". If you say: "I like dog" it makes it sound like you like to eat dog. Okay? And this is true for a lot of animals. If we say: "I like chicken", it means I like to eat chicken. This is very different from: "I like chickens", which means: "I think chickens are cute. I enjoy chickens, and I find them very interesting." Okay, so the next question is a pronunciation question, and that is: What is the pronunciation difference between "dogs" and "ducks"? So a duck is an animal, you know, that says: "Quack quack", at least in English it does, and a lot of students, when they say these words they pronounce them the same way.
How to learn English if you are shy How to learn English if you are shy
3 years ago En
Are you shy? Do you feel uncomfortable or embarrassed when speaking English? Are you envious when your classmates, coworkers, or friends seem so comfortable speaking English to each other or in front of groups? In this video, I will give you advice to overcome your shyness. If you are shy, don't be discouraged, because you can learn English just as well as talkative, social people, but you need to use different strategies. Today, I will share my tips and tricks with you to help you break out of your shell! Did you understand the video? Take the quiz to find out: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-learn-english-if-you-are-shy/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to help you become a better speaker, especially if you are shy. Okay? So, a lot of people when they learn new languages, they're very embarrassed and they're too shy to speak. This video will help you with good tips and strategies on how to become more confident in your speaking. So let's get started. Okay, so the first thing I like to tell shy people, so people who are afraid to speak, is: You need to find your strengths. You need to ask yourself: "What am I good at?" Because a lot of the times, shy people, they think: "Oh my goodness, I'm not good at speaking, I'm terrible at English, I'll never learn this language", and they feel really sad. But that's not usually true. Usually shy people are good at many different things, they just don't realize it. So remember: English is not only speaking. Speaking is part of it, but there are other skills, too. Maybe you're a great listener. Okay? Maybe you're good at grammar. Maybe you're not good at all grammar, but you're amazing at the present perfect or the simple past. You know, maybe you're good at reading or writing. So it's good to recognize what you're good at so you don't feel so sad when you're learning English, because you might be good at a lot of different things. So, you can always write down on a piece of paper: "I am able to", you know, listen very well, or: "I am able to do well on my grammar test." Okay? So think about: What are your strengths? My next tip is probably one of the most important tips. When you're trying to learn a language, especially when you're shy, it's good to make goals and to write them down. Okay? So what do I mean by goals? Well, for example, I have three goals here and I'm going to talk about each of them. Somebody's goal might be: "I will be a better speaker." Or they might say: "I will say two things in class today." Or: "I will ask two people: 'How is your day going?'" So these are all goals, but these goals are not all great goals. What do I mean by that? Well, this first goal: "I will be a better speaker", you will not know if you've become a better speaker or not. This goal, it's too big so I would not use this goal. Okay? When you make a goal it's good to make something where you have a number in it, and you can tell very easily: Did you do it or didn't you do it? So, for example: "I will say two things in class today", this is a great goal because you know: "Okay, I said two things in class, I met my goal for the day." This will really help you with speaking, especially if you're shy. Maybe you're too shy even to say two things in class, so maybe you can say one thing in class or maybe for the first class you can just listen and try for the next class to say one thing. Okay? Another example of a great goal is: "I will ask two", and again, this can be any number. "I will ask two people: 'How is your day going today?'" So just by making goals, it can really encourage you to speak and practice your English, and you will improve this way because it is important to speak as much as you can. This way, you know, it's not too difficult, it's something you can do. The other key point here is: Write down your goals. I think it's great to have a journal or a diary where you write down your daily goal, and then at the end of the week you can check it off and see: Did I meet this goal? Hopefully you did, and that way you can actually monitor your English progress. So now let's look at some more tips. Okay, so my next tip is very important, too: Don't compare yourself to extroverts. So, what is an extrovert? It's the opposite of a shy person. So, an extrovert is somebody who everybody pays attention to because they love to talk, they're great in social situations, they're usually with friends or out with people. So, an extrovert is somebody who's not really shy. So, what a lot of shy people do is they compare themselves. They see the extrovert, and they think: "Wow, I wish I was just like that person. That person's speaking is so good. Why can't I speak like that?" It's very common to compare yourself, but it's not a good idea, because number one, it's possible that person is making a lot of mistakes.
Emma's TOP 15 STUDY TIPS Emma's TOP 15 STUDY TIPS
3 years ago En
Want to do better on your tests? Improve your grades? If you are a student or have an upcoming exam, this lesson is for YOU. Many students spend hours studying in libraries, but they use bad study techniques and waste a lot of time. In this video, I will give you all my BEST study tips. I've found these over the years as both a student and a teacher. Whether you're prepping for the TOEFL or IELTS, taking university or high school classes, or want to improve your memory, this video will help. Take the quiz! http://www.engvid.com/emmas-top-15-study-tips/ Check out the related videos on Power Poses (https://youtu.be/-iRBcNs9oI8) and Mind Maps (https://youtu.be/P1GAGSdAvxM) For more study free advice about studying for exams, go to http://www.goodluckexams.com TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you my top study tips. So if you are having a test coming up or an exam, this might be a high school test or it might be the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP-there's so many different tests-maybe it's a university exam, whatever the case - if you have a test coming up, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a lot of well-researched tips that can really help you improve your marks and to feel more confident the day you're actually taking the test. Okay, so let's get started at some study tips. My first question to you is I want you to think about it. You have a test coming up, where do you study? Some people study in their bed, some might study in the library, maybe a coffee shop, a classroom, or your home. In your opinion, what is the best way to study? Okay, well, if you said your bed, for most people this is a very bad idea. The reason why is if you're studying in your bed with all your books and your notes, your brain, when you're in bed you start thinking about sleep. So if you're studying in your bed, you might become very sleepy and it might be harder to study. So, in... I would not recommend this. Okay? I don't think the bed is a good place to study. What about a library? Some people like studying in libraries, and sometimes it's a good idea. But if you're doing an English test, like where you have a speaking component, a library may or may not be a good place for you. What you really want to do is think about: Where are you taking this test? If you're going to be in a room with many people who maybe are talking or are being loud, you want to study in a similar environment. Okay? So, for some people the library, you know, might be a good place. For other people, maybe the library is not the best place. My point is: You want to study in a place that is just like the environment you'll be taking the test in. So, this is a possibility. Other people might study in coffee shops. Now, if you're doing the IELTS or the TOEFL, this is not a bad idea because at least you're surrounded by people, you're surrounded by distractions, and on your test day you probably will have some sort of distractions around you, especially if people are doing speaking tests where they're talking and you can hear them. So, being around people, if you're doing a test where people will be kind of loud and distracting, a coffee shop is a good idea. But if, you know, there's no speaking component to your test, maybe you're just writing an essay or something like that, then maybe a classroom might actually be a better place. If you're in school and you can go to a place that looks like where you're taking the test, this is the best thing you can do. For home, I personally don't think home is the greatest place to study and I'll tell you why. At home you have your furniture, you have your bed, you have all these distractions around you, so it's easy to stop paying attention to what you're studying, and also your house is not like the environment you'll be taking the test in. You want an environment as similar as possible to where you're actually taking the test, so I would not recommend studying at home. One thing, though, is sometimes it's good to study in multiple locations because the more places you study, the more memories you'll actually have of what you're studying, you'll remember: "Okay, I remember studying this at this coffee shop. I remember studying this at this library, and this at this classroom." So that can actually help... You know, the more places you study, the more memories you will have. Okay, another important thing to note is: Think about your personality. Are you an introvert? This means: Are you a quiet person who kind of prefers to be alone most of the time, where you don't really like big groups? Or maybe you're an extrovert. Okay? So this is where you love big groups, you're, you know, the life of the party, you like being around people. Do you like being alone or with people? Because depending on your answer to that, it can really affect your studying.
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