Learn English with Emma [engVid]
Hi, my name is Emma, and I'm going to teach you English! Learning a different language can be hard, but it can also be a fun and rewarding experience. I am TESOL-certified and have taught students from various backgrounds, ages, and levels. From immigrants to international students, private lessons to classrooms, my experiences have been varied and have allowed me to gain insight into the challenges that ESL students face. Teaching is one of those great professions that allow you to be forever learning. While I teach students both French and English, they teach me about their cultures, their lives, and other ways to see the world. It is a privilege to teach and I am thankful for all of my students over the years who have shared their stories, interests, and dreams with me.

119 videos
12 English Expressions with ALL: "for all I know", "all along", "all talk"... 12 English Expressions with ALL: "for all I know", "all along", "all talk"...
2 weeks ago En
Do you want to learn some useful English expressions? In this video, I will teach you common expressions with the word "all" in them. What does it mean when someone is a "know-it-all" or "not all there"? What is the difference between "all along" and "all over"? I will also teach about the following expressions: all in all, all-nighter, all the way, for all I know, for all I care, all for it, all talk, and once and for all. After watching the video, take my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-idioms-all/ to practice what you've learned. #engvid #LearnEnglish #expressions TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some new expressions. These expressions all have the word "all" in them. Okay? So you're going to learn a lot of new words today, or a lot of new expressions. So, let's get started. The first expression I want to teach you is one of my favourites: "an all-nighter". So, an all-nighter is when you stay awake for over 24 hours. So, you do not sleep. So, who pulls an all-nighter? Usually students before an exam or a test might pull an all-nighter; or maybe somebody has a big project and they don't have time to sleep because they want to finish the project, so they might pull an all-nighter. You'll notice that the verb we often use with "all-nighter" is "pull". An all-nighter is a noun, so we have "an". "I pulled an all-nighter." This means: I did not sleep for more than 24 hours. When I was a student, I only pulled an all-nighter once. Okay? Which is good. That's pretty good. Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? I hope you're not the type of person that pulls all-nighters all the time, because I have a friend who does that all the time, and - ugh, seems so terrible. So that's the word "all-nighter". What's another expression with the word "all"? I like this one a lot, too: "all talk". So, "all talk" is an adjective, and it means when we talk about doing something, but we never do it. Okay? So, I have some friends who are all talk. That means that they always talk about doing something, but they never have done it or they never will. So, for example, I have one friend named Chris, and Chris has a boss who he just hates. His boss is a terrible boss, and he's been working at the same company for three years, and his boss and him get into arguments all the time. Now, what Chris says every time I see Chris is Chris says: "You know, I almost punched my boss today. I was so angry with my boss, I almost punched him today", which is not a good thing to do to anybody, but, you know, also not a good thing to do to your boss. So, what I say to Chris is: "Chris, you are all talk. You will never punch your boss", and that's a good thing. But "all talk" - Chris always says he's going to punch his boss, but he never actually does. Maybe you have a friend like this. I have another friend who says that, you know, she's going to quit her job. She hates her job and she's always saying: "You know, I'm going to quit my job. I'm going to quit my job." But she hasn't for a very long time, so you might say: "You're all talk." Okay? Meaning: You're not going to do it. Another expression we have here is: "all for it". "All for it" means when you strongly agree with a decision or an action. So, for example, I just told you about my friend who wants to quit her job - I'm all for it. That means I strongly agree with her to quit her job, because she's so unhappy there. "All for it". "All for it" is when we strongly agree with an action or a decision. Imagine you are at your friend's place, and somebody wants to order a pizza. If you agree with this decision, you can say: "I'm all for it. I'm all for ordering pizza." Okay? Maybe you want to study in Toronto. Maybe you're learning English, and your dream is to come to Toronto to study English. I'm from Toronto, so what I would say to that is: "I'm all for it." That means I agree with your decision. Okay? So, these are just some of the ways we can use "all for it". Let's look at some other examples of expressions with "all" in them. So, our next expression is kind of interesting because it has the word "all" in it twice. "All in all". "All in all". So, what does "all in all" mean? Well, we use it to mean everything considered, or it's another way to say: "On the whole". So, for example, maybe I'm talking about my trip - my trip to France, and I'm saying: "Oh, the food was great, you know, the people were wonderful, I loved it, but it rained, you know, so that was kind of disappointing, but everything else was amazing." When I look at the trip completely, what I can say when I consider everything, I can say: "All in all, we had an amazing time in France". "All in all" - when you consider everything. "All in all, you know, there's some things I like about English, maybe some things like certain types of grammar are annoying; but all in all, English is a really cool language." […]
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Practice your VOCABULARY, LISTENING, and COMPREHENSION with this game Practice your VOCABULARY, LISTENING, and COMPREHENSION with this game
1 month ago En
Want to improve your listening skills and improve your vocabulary at the same time? Do you want to have fun while learning? In this video, I will teach you common words we use while describing people's faces. Then, you will practice your listening skills in a fun and interesting activity. Get a pen and paper ready for this interactive and hands-on video. If you want even more practice, try my helpful quiz at the end of the video at https://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-listening-comprehension-faces-game/ #engvid #vocabulary #LearnEnglish Next, watch my video on 11 'MIND' Expressions in English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_N9iPueids&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=12 TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to do something very special. Okay? We are going to practice our listening skills by doing a really, really fun activity that I love to do with my classes. So, for this video, we are going to be listening for adjectives about the face. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a whole bunch of new words, and maybe some words you already know, when... That we can use to describe our faces. Okay? So you are going to first learn some new words and we're going to review some words; and once you have these words down, what we are going to do is I am going to describe a face to you, and while I describe it, you're going to listen carefully and you are going to draw the face. Okay? So this is what you're going to do: You're going to take your pen or your pencil, and a piece of paper, and you are going to draw what I describe. Okay? Now, it's okay if you're not a great artist; you don't have to be for this video. You don't have to Picasso or Leonardo Da Vinci. Okay? As you can tell, I'm not the greatest of artists, so that's okay. But after you listen and you draw what I say, you're going to look at your picture and you're going to compare it to my picture or what I was describing. And then you can see: "Okay. Are these the same? Are they different? Did I follow the instructions? Did I understand these adjectives correctly?" And so this is a great way to really practice your listening, and to also learn some new words. All right? So let's get started. Ta-da. Here is my art. Okay? So I'm going to describe these pictures now, just so you learn some new words, and we're... We're also going to review maybe some words you already know. Okay? And I hope none of my drawings creep you out; I know that, you know, they might be a little bit unusual, but let's get started. So, when we're talking about faces, there's many different ways to describe a face; I've just picked two. This man has a long face. Okay? His face is in the shape of an oval, but it's also very long. Now, compare this to this person who has a round face; more like a circle. Okay? So, during the description I'm going to be describing faces, and I'm going to either use the word: "a long face" or "a round face". Okay? So, here we have the eyes, we have the nose, we have the mouth... In this picture we have lips which are these things, so we might have really red lips or big lips, like Angelina Jolie; maybe small lips, thin lips. Okay? Another thing I'm going to talk about in this video is eyebrows. So, the eyebrows are this part of your face; they're the hairy part above the eyes, here. So, I have two different types of eyebrows. These eyebrows... So you see we have eyes here. The eyebrows here are very thin; whereas these eyebrows are thick, or we can also call them bushy eyebrows. Okay? Because they almost look like bushes. Bushy or thick. Okay. Another thing you're going to hear during this listening activity is I'm going to talk about wrinkles. So, what's a "wrinkle"? Well, as you get older, your face starts to develop these lines, usually around the eyes or maybe around, you know, your smile - and we call these age lines wrinkles. Okay? So here's the spelling of that word. So, you'll be hearing this word during the listening activity. You might also hear the word "braces". So, braces are something that helps your teeth to become straight. So, during the listening, one of the people I'm going to be describing may have braces. So this is the teeth, and it's just a piece of wire that goes across the teeth to help keep the teeth straight. Okay. So, anything else on this picture? No? Let's move on to this picture. The other thing you might hear during this activity is I might be describing facial hair. So, when I'm talking about facial hair, I'm not talking about the hair on the head; I'm talking about the hair on the face. So, this man has a lot of facial hair. He has a beard, which is hair that comes from your chin, down. You might have a short beard or a very long beard. This man has a long beard. I also put a moustache on this man, so that's the facial hair or the hair under the nose - the moustache. And this is how we spell that word. […]
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Find a NEW JOB in North America: Cover Letter & Resume Advice Find a NEW JOB in North America: Cover Letter & Resume Advice
2 months ago En
Looking for a job? You will need to create a resume and a cover letter. But the rules on what to include and what NOT to include are different from country to country. To get you started, I've put together this lesson on writing cover letters and resumes, where I will give you all of my key tips. I will also talk about the reasons why we write cover letters and resumes and give you some important points on formatting. Watch my other job skill videos to learn about job interviews and for specific vocabulary you should use on your resume. Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/north-america-jobs-cover-letter-resume-advice/ Download a sample resume here: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/resume-sample-tips/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to talk to you about cover letters and resumes. So, if you are going to be looking for a job soon... Maybe you're new to Canada, or England, or the USA, or new to an English-speaking country and you're looking for a job or you will be looking for a job soon, this video can really help you with that. Cover letters and resumes really are different in different parts of the world. Okay? So there's a lot of different cultural parts that you need to know when you're writing a cover letter or resume, and in this video I'm going to talk about the cultural aspects of both. So, this video you're going to learn more of an overview about cover letters and resumes, what their purpose is, and the type of information we include on them. Okay, so let's get started. Okay, so a cover letter and a resume are two different documents that have very different formats. They look very differently from one another. A cover letter is a letter format, whereas a resume has its own special format, but there are certain things that are common or the same for both. One of the things that's common for both a cover letter and a resume is their purpose. The purpose of a cover letter and resume is to help you get an interview for a job, or help you get the job. Okay? So, when you think about a cover letter or a resume, imagine a company is asking you: "Why should we hire you? What makes you special? What makes you right for this job?" Your cover letter and your resume are the answer to this. They tell employers about your amazing skills. Okay? Maybe you know CPR, maybe you're great when it comes to computers, maybe you speak four languages. Okay? So they tell your employer... Your future employers this. They talk about your abilities, they talk about your experience, your education experience, your work experience, you know, maybe some other organizations you're a part of and the experiences you had there, and they also talk about your accomplishments, your successes. Okay? Maybe at this company you increased sales, maybe you won a customer service award because you're so great when it comes to talking to customers. Okay? So your resume and cover letter show all these great things about you, and they answer the question: Why should we hire you? Okay? So, a lot of people want to know: "Do I need both a cover letter and a resume? Can I just give my resume or just my cover letter?" For most jobs you will need at the very least a resume. Okay? This is one of the most important things you give when you're applying for a job, and then for a lot of jobs they also will want a cover letter. So, how do you know if you need both? Well, when you apply to the job, look at the job advertisement. Usually in the advertisement they say if they want just a resume, or if they want a cover letter and a resume. If you don't know and you can't find the information, it's a good idea to send both. A lot of people want to know: "Can I reuse my resume and cover letter for each job I apply for? Writing cover letters and resumes are a lot of work, so can I just give the same cover letter and resume to everybody, and every job I apply for?" In general, that's not a good idea, and the reason is usually companies can tell that they're getting the same resume and cover letter as other companies, because you're not saying specific things about how your skills match this company's skills or this company's... What this company wants. So as a result, it's always the best idea to write a different cover letter for each job you apply for. Okay? I know that's a lot of work, but you will be more likely... You're more likely to get the job if you do a good job on your cover letter instead of just sending everyone the same ones, and it's the same with resumes. You know, different jobs you might want to highlight or talk about different things on your resume. If you're applying to this company, maybe you'll talk about a certain work experience, whereas this company maybe you'll talk about a different work experience. Okay? So very important to write your cover letter and your resume for each job. […]
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Learn English Vocabulary: FAKE NEWS Learn English Vocabulary: FAKE NEWS
3 months ago En
Have you heard of "fake news"? What about the words "conspiracy theory" and "hoax"? The topic of fake news has become very popular in the news lately. It refers to information that is not true or not accepted as truth by mainstream society. In this video, I will teach you some key vocabulary we use when talking about fake news. I'll also give you examples of their use. Next, I will talk about some expressions you can use if someone gives you fake news or tells you a story that isn't true. After watching, take my quiz to practice the new words and expressions you've learned. https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-vocabulary-fake-news/ Next, watch this lesson on negative political vocabulary that you will hear in the news often: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45e99fofgJc&index=10&list=PLpRs5DzS7VqpcTS7hXJU4ARPwSETGI1gy TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you some key expressions you can use when somebody tells you something that's not true and you want to argue against what they're saying. So, in this video I'm going to teach you these great expressions, but before I do that, we're going to talk about three words that are very common in English these days. Those three words are: "Fake news", "conspiracy theories", and "hoaxes". So in this video you will learn what these words mean, and you will also learn what to say to somebody that tells you something that's not true. All right, so let's get started. So I have here three sentences. The first sentence is: "Scientists say the earth is flat. Not round." Is this true or not true? Okay, this sentence is not true. Some people believe this, but it is not true. My second sentence: "Michael Jackson is alive and living as Kim Kardashian." True or not true? Again, we have a sentence that is not true; I made this up. And finally, my third sentence: "Listening to rock music causes cancer." Is this true or untrue? Again, this is untrue; I also made up this. So my point here is that a lot of what you hear from people in conversation not true. People say these types of things all the time, and you will know that this is something that's not true, so what do you say when someone tells you that the earth is flat, or they tell you that Michael Jackson is living as Kim Kardashian? Okay? So, I will teach you those great expressions you can use. Before I do that, I wanted to just say that these three sentences can also be considered fake news. So, we will look at the meaning of fake news in a moment. Okay, so the three main words I wanted to teach you today are words that you will see a lot on the internet and in the media. The first word is: "fake news". So what is fake news? Well, "fake" means not true. "Fake news" is news stories that are not true, and they're created to damage a person, a business, an agency, or a government, or they might also be created to get attention and to get clicks on the internet. So you'll see a lot of fake news on different social media, like Twitter, Facebook, and a lot of other places, too, online. So, this is a very common word these days, a lot of people are using it, so it's important that you know what it means. We also have the word here: "conspiracy theory". So, "a conspiracy theory" is an explanation of an event or situation that is different from the official account. A lot of the times conspiracy theories are about a government or a business doing something illegal or to harm someone. Okay? So let's think of some conspiracy theories. Some people believe that the moon landing, so when... When astronauts went to the moon in the 1960s, some people believe the moon landing was fake. This is a popular conspiracy theory. Another conspiracy theory I heard recently is some people believe that Paul McCartney from the Beetles actually died in 1966, and there is a different man who replaced him and who is actually the better musician. So this is a different conspiracy theory. So, you'll see a lot of conspiracy theories on the internet, and a lot of people will tell you conspiracy theories during conversations. The last word I wanted to teach you was the word: "hoax", "hoax". So, "a hoax" is a type of practical joke that is meant to embarrass or hurt people. So some examples of hoaxes are you'll have these death hoaxes, where they'll say a celebrity is dead, but it's not true; it's a joke. Or you might have a hoax, like, you know, some people might take a picture of an alien or a monster and tell everyone: "Look, we have evidence of this monster alien." But if it's not true, then it's a hoax. It's a joke, a practical joke. So, again, fake news, conspiracy theories, and hoaxes are very common on the internet, and so for these things that are not true, what do you say to people when they tell you this untrue information? Well, let's find out in a moment. […]
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Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE
4 months ago En
What does "in case" mean? When do we use it? In this video, you will learn about this commonly used expression. This lesson is part vocabulary and part grammar. After watching, you will be able to use "in case" properly in a sentence, which will be very useful for expressing a request, a condition, a particular event, and more. Take my quiz at the end of the video to practice using "in case". You can watch the video more than once in case you forget something. TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON HERE: https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-expressions-just-in-case/ WATCH ANOTHER VIDEO NOW: 1. How to use ABOUT TO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQx2tEWxC1Q&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=17&t=0s 2. WHILE or MEANWHILE? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EofcMDlVNIk&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=82&t=0s TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you about a very important piece of vocabulary -- it's also very important when it comes to grammar -- and that is the expression: "Just in case" or we can also say: "in case". So, we use this a lot in English, so it's very... It's something very important for you to learn. So let's talk about what it means and how we use it. So, we use: "in case" or "just in case"-we use both-when we are talking about doing something to prevent a problem. Okay? So we're talking about... Or doing something to prepare for a problem. So, we're looking at a problem and we're looking at preparation or prevention of that problem. Okay? So, for example: "Tonight, I am going to a restaurant." I'm very excited. Now, the problem is I get cold very easily, and when I'm cold I'm not a very nice person; I get very cranky, and I'm not a good person to be with when I'm cold. So my problem is I get cold easily. What is my prevention or preparation for this problem? Well: "I will bring a sweater just in case I get cold." Okay? And that way I will have a great time at the restaurant, hopefully. So my problem is being cold, and my preparation is I'm going to bring a sweater. So, as you can see, if you think about life, we have a lot of these types of problems and we do a lot of things to prepare for these types of problems. So let's look at some other examples. Okay, a problem is when it rains... Okay? A lot of the times when it rains, you know, I don't like getting wet, so what do I do? Well, my preparation or prevention is I bring an umbrella, or maybe I'll bring a rain jacket. Okay? So: "I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains." Another problem is if you work at 9am, you know, a lot of the times there's a lot of cars; everybody's going to work at the same time, there's a lot of traffic. And if there's a lot of traffic maybe you'll be late for work. So what will you do for this problem? So, traffic is the problem or maybe going to work late is the problem, but what you can do to prevent or prepare for this problem is you can leave your house early. So: "I leave my house early every day just in case there's traffic." Another example of a problem is maybe you're going to visit your friend, and your friend gives you their address. Now, if you don't write down their address, you're going to be lost. I don't know where they live. I need to go to my friends' house, I forget their address; I don't know where they live. So this is the problem. Especially if you're very forgetful like me or you always forget people's phone numbers or, you know, where people live, this is a big problem. So what do you do to prevent this problem? Well, you write down their address. Okay? On a piece of paper, your friend tells you their address, you write it down. Why do you write it down? "You write down their address just in case you forget it." Okay? You forget their address. So I've just given you some examples of where we would use "just in case". There are a lot of examples for "just in case". I want you to think about your life. Is there something that happens every day to you, maybe you have some sort of problem or something you worry about? So think about that for a second. Is there something you worry about every day, and what do you do to prepare for that or to prevent a problem from happening? Okay? Maybe, you know, you're worried about failing your test, so you might create a study group just in case. Okay? Or maybe, you know, your teacher gives you homework. Maybe you will do the homework just in case they want to see it. So, you see what I'm saying? There's a lot of problems you might have, and a lot of preventions or preparations you do for those problems. So try to think of one in your own life. Okay, so now we are going to look at the grammar of "just in case" or "in case". Okay, so we've already looked at what are problems, and how we prepare or prevent problems. Now let's look at some examples of: How do we create this sentence in a grammatical fashion? So, I have here the sentence: "I will bring an umbrella in case it rains." […]
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My TOP 5 Writing Tips (for all levels) My TOP 5 Writing Tips (for all levels)
4 months ago En
Whether English is your first, second, or third language, developing your writing abilities will help you in educational, work, and social media contexts. In this lesson, I will talk about writing in general and discuss both formal and informal writing. It is critical to learn the difference between formal and informal writing, including differences based on vocabulary, grammar, and format. I will teach you some strategies for how to plan your writing. My five tips will help you improve your writing regardless of your current level. Watch the video, follow my advice, and your writing will improve. Test yourself with the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/my-top-5-writing-tips-for-all-levels/ Did you like this video? Keep improving by watching another video now: 1. 5 MORE tips on how to improve your writing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgkRoYPLhts&t=0s&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=107 2. Writing an Essay: Paraphrasing the question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9aVjBHEEbU&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=30&t=0s TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you some great writing tips. These tips are for both academic writing and non-academic writing. Okay? So it's for writing in general. Now, this video is going to be in two parts, because I have so many tips, so I'm going to give five tips in this video and five tips in the next video. Okay, so let's get started. So, there are so many different ways... Or so many different types of writing we do in our lives; we write emails, we write essays if we're a student, we might write a Facebook post, or we might write a resume or a cover letter. So it's very important to develop your writing skills because you will be writing throughout your life a lot. So let's look at my first tip. My first tip is: It's very important to think about the genre of what you're writing. "Genre" is a very fancy word that pretty much means type. So, a genre of writing might be an essay, or it might be a cover letter, or an email, or a tweet. These are all different genres, and each one of these has a different expectation on what you should include and how you should write it. So it's very important, first step is: Know the genre or know the type, and know what is expected of you. Also important in this is knowing your audience, or thinking about your audience. So, for example, if you write an email, the language you're going to use and the way you're going to write will be different if you write an email to your friend versus an email to your boss. So it's important to think about: "Who are you writing to?" because this is going to help you decide what to write and how to write it. Same with, you know, if you are on Twitter and you write a tweet, or on Facebook a Facebook post, you know, it's important to think about your audience. You know, are you writing this post for friends to see, or is this a post your boss might see, or members of the public? You know, and that could be a problem. So it's important to think about, especially with this and on other social media, too: Audience. Who will see this and what will they think about it, and what are their expectations? You know, some people work for companies where they're responsible for social media, so it's important, too, the type of wording they use when they're writing on Facebook. If you work at a company and you're writing for your company, it's going to be different than if you're writing for your friends. Same with an essay. An essay has a certain structure, you know, it's supposed to be a certain amount of pages, it has a certain organization to it, and so knowing what's expected of you when you write an essay will help you because it's going to be very different than, for example, a Facebook post. Same with in business, business reports. Understanding the format of a business report is important if this is something you're going to be writing, and thinking about your audience. Same with executive summaries, which is a type of thing businesspeople write. If you're not in business you might not ever write one of these, but if you are in business you need to realize that audience is important because professionals are going to be reading this, and these people are busy, so, you know, knowing your audience and knowing what is expected of you is the very first step to good writing. Let's look at some other tips. Okay, so we've talked about genre or the type of writing you're doing, and part of this is knowing the expectations for how long what you write should be. Okay? So you want to know a bit about length expectations before you start writing. This is really important, especially in university where you often have a number of pages you're allowed to write. It's important, you know, in the workplace because sometimes, you know, you can't write a lot. […]
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Why you should make mistakes, and how to learn from them Why you should make mistakes, and how to learn from them
5 months ago En
Are you embarrassed or frustrated when you make mistakes? You are not alone. Many learners feel bad when they make a mistake, but they don't realize that making mistakes can help them improve! In fact, making mistakes is one of the BEST WAYS TO LEARN, especially if you are trying to learn a language. In this video, I will teach you that making mistakes is a very important part of learning a language. I will then show you some ways you can use your mistakes to improve your English. We will go through some practical tips on what you should do to maximize your learning. Which mistakes should you focus on? How do you know what your mistakes are? How can you make sure that you are improving? For answers to these questions and more, watch the video. Now it's time to watch another video! Watch this video about how to stop wasting time and start learning: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REJNBGEAQRo&list=PLaNNx1k0ao1u-x_nKdKNh7cKALzelzXjY&index=11&t=0s Take the quiz on this lesson: https://www.engvid.com/why-you-should-make-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about mistakes and why we should make them, and: What should we do when we make them? Okay? So, I hope you're making mistakes; very, very important when you're learning anything. Whether it's math, science, English, French, Spanish, Chinese - you want to make mistakes. Okay? I cannot say that enough. If you're not making mistakes, then you're doing something wrong because if you're making mistakes it means you're actually using the language or, you know, you're actually... It's very important in the learning process to make mistakes. So, in this video I'm going to teach you six ways or six steps on how to improve with mistakes. Okay? So, before I get started, I just wanted to again say: Please, please, please make mistakes, especially when you're learning a language because mistakes equal good learning. Okay? So, I... You know, I know a lot of students when they go out and they're talking to a native speaker, they feel so embarrassed. "Oh my goodness, I just... I can't believe I just said that. I made a mistake with the present perfect. Oh my god", it's not a big deal, you should be making these mistakes. So, the first step on how to learn from your mistakes is: Give yourself permission to make mistakes. Okay? You want to tell yourself it's okay, and I can't stress this enough. Tell yourself: "I need to make mistakes. Today I'm going to try make mistakes.", "Another mistake? Yay me. Woo! Very good." Okay? So give yourself permission. Don't look at mistakes as a bad thing because they are not a bad thing. Mistakes, when learning a language, are actually a good thing. So, step two: Once you give yourself permission to make mistakes, you should start to know your mistakes. Okay? What are the mistakes you're making? So one way you can find out what mistakes you're making is you can ask your teacher, or your friend, or, you know, somebody you're close to, maybe your classmate. You can ask them: "What's my biggest mistake? When I speak English, what's my biggest mistake? In my writing, what's my biggest mistake?" Okay? So a lot of the times other people can help and tell you what your biggest mistake is. Another thing you should be asking: "Why is it a mistake? What is the problem with this? Why is it a mistake?" Okay? A lot of the times with students I've found, and I'm also guilty of this, I remember in university I would write an essay and I would get all these comments on my essay and I'd also get a mark or a grade, you know, like A+, B, whatever. And I remember always looking just at the percent I got or the grade, and not looking at the comments. Those comments that your teachers write actually tell you a lot about the mistakes you're making, so please, please, please see that, read it, focus on it, and think about it. Okay? Whatever your teacher writes on your essay, on your test, take a moment to really think about that mistake. Also, another way to know what mistakes you're making is you can think about what mistakes are common for people speaking your language. So, for example, if a Spanish person is learning English, maybe they say: "I am agree", which is fine in Spanish, but in English it's a mistake; or maybe if you're Brazilian, you want to say the word "red" but you say the word "head" because the R sound and the H sound, I think, you know, with Brazilian students this is often a pronunciation mistake. So think about: What mistakes are common for your culture? We have a lot of resources on this on engVid actually, where you can actually see common mistakes for your language. Okay. I'm going to get into this in a moment with the next step, but I'll just say it right now because I really want you to think about this: When you ask somebody: "What is my biggest mistake?", try to focus on one mistake. […]
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How to pronounce "OF" like a native English speaker How to pronounce "OF" like a native English speaker
6 months ago En
Stop talking like a robot! Some words don't always sound the same, and this is especially true when native English speakers speak quickly. In this short and simple video, I will teach you about the different ways we pronounce the preposition "of". For example, did you know we pronounce "a lot of" like "alotta" in conversations? Understanding the pronunciation of words can also help you develop better listening skills. Take the quiz to test your understanding: https://www.engvid.com/how-to-pronounce-of-like-a-native-english-speaker/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to help you with your pronunciation. Today I am going to teach you how to pronounce one of the most common words in English. That word is the word "of". Okay? So, when we say "of" just on its own as a single word, we usually pronounce it like this: "ov", which has kind of like a "v" sound at the end, "of". Now, that's kind of hard to pronounce. There's an easier way that we pronounce this word when we use it in a sentence or an expression, and that's what we're going to learn today. So let's get started. Okay, so I have here some English expressions. I have: "A lot of", "Slice of pie", "Piece of cake". Now, when I actually say this, I don't say: "ov". I want you to listen very carefully to what I'm actually saying and how I pronounce the word "of" in these expressions. Okay? "A lot a". I'll say that one more time: "A lot a". "Slice a pie", "Slice a pie", "Piece a cake", "Piece a cake". Okay? Now, I've said it a little louder than I usually would, but you'll notice I didn't say: "Slice ov pie", I said: "A slice a pie". So my point here is that native speakers of English, especially North American English, usually do not pronounce "of" like this; we actually pronounce it more like "a". Okay? So, what we can do is we can actually add an "a" here. So I want you to repeat after me: "A lot a", "A lot a", "I have a lot a friends." Okay? "A lot a". And we also say "a" a little bit quieter because it's not a stressed syllable. So we like to say it quieter than the rest of the expression. "Slice a pie". So I can remove this and add an "a". So let's say that together: "Slice a pie". All right, now let's try this expression: "A piece a cake". So this means it's something that's easy, so: "piece a cake". Okay? So let's do some practice together. And you will see "of" a lot in English, so this is a really good word to practice and to get used to pronouncing in a native speaker way, because: A) it will be easier to understand you, and B) "a" is a lot easier to say than "ov". Okay? So let's practice these sentences together. So, I've put the word "of" with a red underline, and anytime you see "of", I want you to change it to "a", okay? So, let's say this together: "It is made of brick. It is made of brick.", "He has lots of money. He has lots of money." Okay. "Game of Thrones." If you like that TV show, that's a really important thing to be able to pronounce. "Game of Thrones.", "I thought of something." So, again, let's turn this to "a": "I thought of something.", "It's a piece of cake." And that means it's something very easy. "It's a piece of cake." Okay? This is actually one of my favourite idioms: "It's a piece of cake." All right? So now let's do some more practice on the word "of" and its pronunciation. So one thing you can do if you're having trouble with the pronunciation of "of" in sentences, or expressions, or phrases is you can actually just put the "a" underneath "of" to help remind you. Okay? So this is one thing you can do when you're practicing the pronunciation of this. So let's practice some more sentences. "That's a nice piece of furniture." Okay? So now I want you to try: "That's a nice piece of furniture." And, again, when we say this part, we're not saying it loud, we're not saying: "Piece a furniture", we say it kind of quietly: "Piece of furniture". Okay? Let's try the next one: "The cost of living is high. The cost of living is high." Okay. You can do it one more time. "The cost..." Sorry. "The cost of living is high." All right. Let's do this next sentence. And, by the way, at the time of filming, Justin Trudeau is the Prime Minister, just in case, you know, it changes, I want this to make some sense. "The Prime Minister of Canada is handsome." Okay? He's a handsome man. "The Prime Minister of Canada is handsome." Okay? So now you can try to say that. Okay. Now let's try another sentence: "Many of the shows are comedies. Many of the shows are comedies." Okay? And when we say this part, we also kind of say it quicker, too. "Many of the shows are comedies", versus if I said: "Many of the shows are comedies." You can say that, but again, most native speakers say it very quick and more like a "a" sound. "Many of the shows are comedies." All right, and let's try one more: "Ottawa is..." So first I'll say it slow. "Ottawa is north of Toronto. Ottawa is north of Toronto." So now you try to say it. […]
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How to succeed in your JOB INTERVIEW: Behavioral Questions How to succeed in your JOB INTERVIEW: Behavioral Questions
6 months ago En
Think about your last job interview. What did you do to prepare for it, and how did it go? Job interviews are difficult whether you are an English learner or a native speaker. If you want to get the job, you need to prepare for the job interview. In many English-speaking countries, interviews often include behavioral questions. In this lesson, I will teach you about behavioral interview questions and how to answer them. This video also has a listening practice portion to train you to recognize these questions, as well as tips on how to prepare for them. Try our quiz at the end to practice what you have learned, nail that interview, and get that job! Then work like a dog for the rest of your life :) Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/job-interview-behavioral-questions/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to do really well on your interview. So, if you're looking for a job and you have an interview coming up, I'm going to talk to you about a type of question you might hear during your interview. I'm going to tell you how to recognize this type of question, and how to answer this type of question, along with many tips that can help you. Okay? So if you're about to do an interview, don't stress out - we can do it. All right, so let's look at the types of questions we're going to talk about today. Today we're talking about behavioural interview questions. Okay? So let's look at some examples to understand what I mean by "behavioural interview questions". Okay, so we have this question: "Tell me about a time when you worked effectively under pressure." So take a moment to think about that question. "Give an example of how you worked on a team.", "Describe a time when you had to deal with a very upset customer.", "Have you ever made a mistake? How did you handle it?" Okay, so when we're talking about behavioural questions, it's important to think about: What is being asked of you? Okay? So, the main thing with these types of questions is this word here: "Give an example". Behavioural questions... behavioural interview questions require that you give an example of how you have dealt with or handled a situation. So, my next question to you is: Do you think we're talking about an example of the past, something that's happened; the present; or the future, something that could happen? So look at these questions. Are we talking about a past example, a present example, or a future example? If you said: "Past example", you are correct. When we talk about behavioural interview questions, what the interviewer is asking is they want you to give a past example. Okay? Something you have done in the past. How can you recognize these types of questions? Because there are many different interview types of questions, these are just one type, so how do you know if it's behavioural interview question? That's a very good question. One way to know is by looking for key words. Okay? So, a lot of the times behavioural questions start off with some sort of hint or clue. "Tell me about a time" is an example. Okay? "Tell me about a time when you worked effectively under pressure.", "Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.", "Tell me about a time when you had problems with your co-workers." Okay? So lot of the times you will hear: "Tell me about" or "Tell me about a time", and that's a signal: Okay, this is probably a behavioural interview question. You might have this as a starter to the question, they might ask you: "Give me an example of how you worked on a team." or "Give me an example of a time when you showed leadership." Okay? So those would both be behavioural questions. Again: "Describe a time". A lot of the times you'll hear the word: "a time" or "an example". So this is another common phrase you will hear with behavioural interview questions. You might also have a question like this: "Have you ever made a mistake?", "Have you ever had difficulties working with somebody?", "Have you ever had a conflict with a customer?", "How did you handle it? What did you do?" So these types of questions, they don't have the same key words as the ones above, but usually they're written or they're said with the present perfect tense, and usually you'll hear a second follow-up question: "How did you handle it?" Okay? So, key word here: "did". If you hear the past tense in the question, then they probably want you to answer the question using a past example. Okay? So, this might be a little bit confusing, you might be a bit worried, you know: "Oh, these questions seem really hard." Well, the very first step is recognizing these questions, so that's what we're going to do right now. We are going to practice recognizing behavioural interview questions. Okay, so now we are going to practice identifying behavioural interview questions. Okay? […]
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Learn English Vocabulary: The people we LOVE ❤ – spouse, girlfriend, partner, husband... Learn English Vocabulary: The people we LOVE ❤ – spouse, girlfriend, partner, husband...
7 months ago En
Ready for an English lesson on romantic relationships? There are many terms we use when talking about people in romantic relationships. Spouse, partner, significant other, husband, wife, better half, lover, girlfriend, boyfriend, couple, and common-law are just some examples of relationship terms we'll be talking about in this video. I will teach you why some people might prefer the term partner instead of husband or wife. We will also discuss what people call the family of their husband or wife. For example, what does the term in-law mean and how do we use it to describe our partner's family? After you've watched this lesson and learned what we call people we are in a relationship with when talking about them, watch Ronnie's lesson to learn what we call them when talking TO them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URoJ6l5MVlY Take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-people-we-love/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about love and romance, and all those wonderful relationship words. Okay? So, this video is very important when we're talking about conversational English and English vocabulary, because a lot of what we talk about is relationships. Maybe if we don't have a relationship, we might talk about our friends' relationships or our family's relationships, so it's good to know these words. So, we're going to talk about some of the more common words you'll hear people talk about. For example, maybe you've wondered before: "What's the difference between: 'spouse', 'husband', and 'partner'? When do I use these different terms?" Well, that's a great question. "What do you call a girlfriend or boyfriend when you're in your 60s?" That's a great question, too. So we have a lot of these questions students often ask, so in this video I'm going to answer them. So let's get started. To start with, let's talk about marriage. Okay? Getting married. What do you call somebody who is married? Well, there are multiple things you can call a person who is married. If we're looking at traditional terms, so terms a lot of people use that are more traditional, you might hear somebody talk about "a husband" if they're talking about a man who is married, you might hear them talk about their "hubby" if they're talking about a husband in an informal way. So, for example, I could talk about my husband or my hubby, they have the same meaning and they're talking about a man. I can also, if I'm talking about a woman, we can use the word "wife": "My wife". If we're talking about more than one husband, we can just add an "s" and say: "husbands". And if we're talking about more than one wife, we actually have to change the spelling from "f" to "v" and add an "s", and so this is pronounced: "wives". "Wife", "wives". Okay? So these are women and these are men. We also have another term which I like: "spouse". So, "spouse" is a word that can mean either a husband or a wife, it's a different word, but the point is that it can be a man or a woman. Okay? So you can talk about: "My spouse", "Your spouse", "How long have you and your spouse been married?" If you're having trouble remembering this word, you can think about a mouse, maybe a mouse who's married, that can help you remember the word "spouse" because it rhymes with "mouse". Okay. So these are more the traditional terms we use when we talk about people who are married. We also have less traditional terms that are very common and many people use. A less traditional term might be the term "partner". When we're talking about partner, you have your business partners, but in a relationship when you're talking about romance and love, you can also have a partner. So, "a partner" is someone you are in a relationship with. So, in this case, "partner" can mean that you're married to the person, so maybe you're married, but it's not necessary. So some people use the term "partner" when they're talking about who they're married to, and other people use the word "partner" and they're not married, so it can mean married or not. We can also use "partner"... It's genderless, meaning we don't know if the partner refers to a man, a woman, or a different gender. We also don't know if the person is in a same-sex relationship, or a gay or lesbian relationship, or if they're in a heterosexual or a straight relationship. So, the word "partner" is... It's different than the more traditional terms because there's a lot of information that people might not want to share, so they might use the word "partner" instead. Or maybe "husband" and "wife", those terms don't apply, so they like the word "partner". You might also hear somebody talk about their "life partner", which is another way to say "partner" or their "domestic partner". […]
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Take the Present Perfect Progressive challenge! Take the Present Perfect Progressive challenge!
8 months ago En
Will you be able to pass my Present Perfect Progressive Challenge?! In this lesson, you will review the grammatical structure of the present perfect progressive tense and learn how to use it in conversation. You'll hear many examples taken from real English conversations and I'll explain how and when you should use this tense. Here is the challenge: First, watch this video. Second, take the quiz to make sure you're using the tense correctly. Third, use the present perfect progressive tense in conversation or in our comments section. Complete this challenge and you'll become more comfortable USING the grammar you learn. Good luck! Practice makes perfect! TAKE THE QUIZ ON MY WEBSITE: https://www.engvid.com/present-perfect-progressive-challenge/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video we are going to talk about grammar, and specifically we are going to talk about the present perfect progressive, and this video is a bit special because in this video I am going to challenge you to use the present perfect progressive in a sentence or in a conversation this week. Okay? So, maybe you've heard of the Ice Bucket Challenge, well, this isn't that. This is the: "Present Perfect Progressive Challenge". Okay? And I hope you do this. So, here's the challenge: Use present perfect progressive tense in one conversation this week. So, in order to do this, first I'm going to teach you: What is the present perfect progressive? We can also call it the present perfect continuous, you might know it by that name. So I'm going to talk about what it is, why we use it. I'm going to teach you about the form of it, so: How does it look? And then we're going to practice it and we're going to talk about how we can actually use this in a conversation. Because I know what happens with many students, they go to class or, you know, they're studying online and they find these great grammar worksheets or resources, and they do them at home and it's great on paper, but then when they're actually in a conversation they get scared about making a mistake or they can't remember the grammar, and so they don't use it. So this video is more practical because I want you to use this grammar. Okay, so let's look at some examples of the present perfect continuous or present perfect progressive. That's going to get tiring to say. It's such a long grammatical term, so if I make a mistake, you know, when I'm saying the word, don't mind that. Okay, so I have some examples here. My first one: "I have"-so this is part of the form-"been working at my company for 5 years". So, just take a moment to think about that. "I have been working at my company for 5 years." Now, let's look at another example. We're going to compare some examples, and then think about what they all mean. "He has been dating my friend for 2 months. He has been dating my friend for 2 months." Let's look at a third example: "We have been studying English forever." [Laughs] Sometimes it might feel that way, but you know, bear with me. "We have been studying English forever." Okay, so what do these sentences have in common? Well, first of all you probably realize these are all present perfect progressive sentences, and they have a lot of things in common. The main thing that we're using the present perfect progressive for is we're talking about how long, so how long something is happening. Okay? So we're talking about the duration of time, how long something happens for. So you'll notice: "I have been working at my company for 5 years." Five years is an amount of time. Okay? "He has been dating my friend for 2 months." Two months is a period of time. "We have been studying English forever." Forever is a very long period of time. Okay? So we're talking about periods of time when we're talking about the present perfect progressive, and we're really answering the question: "How long?" or "How much time?" Okay? So now let's talk a little bit more about the meaning and the form. Okay, so we've looked at some examples of the present perfect progressive, and let's think a little bit more about the meaning. I've drawn here a timeline. Okay? So this is now, today, right now; this is the future; and this is the past. Okay? So when we're talking about the... Well, actually any grammar, what can be really helpful is looking at timelines, they can really help you understand, you know, what these different tenses mean. So let's look at our timeline and what the present perfect progressive tense would look like on the timeline. So, I have here my first example: "I have been working at my company for 5 years." This means that five years ago, so let's go to the past-one, two, three, four, five-I started working, so this is the beginning, and this action continued and continued and continued to right now, so I'm still doing it.
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Learn English with Emma: vocabulary, culture, and the first conditional! Learn English with Emma: vocabulary, culture, and the first conditional!
8 months ago En
I will use one topic to teach you important English grammar (the first conditional), as well as vocabulary. You'll also learn a lot about North American culture. I'll teach you all this stuff by talking about superstitions. Is the number 13 bad luck in your culture? If you break a mirror, will you have bad luck? If you find a penny on the ground, do you think you will have a good day? Every culture has beliefs about luck. We call these beliefs superstitions. Some superstitions are common around the world, but many are very specific to a particular country or culture. My mom is really superstitious, so I grew up with a lot of these beliefs. In this video, I'll give you some examples of common North American superstitions, and in the second half of the video, I'll use this topic to teach you how to use the first conditional in English. Watch this video now. If you don't, your computer might get a virus. Take the quiz! https://www.engvid.com/learn-english-superstitions-first-conditional/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to be talking about three different things. Okay? So, we are going to be learning some new vocabulary that have to do with superstition, and I'll explain what superstitions are; we're going to be learning about culture, and Western culture, and North American culture; as well as grammar, today we are going to be learning about the first conditional. So this is a great video because you are going to be learning a lot by the end of it, hopefully. So, let's get started. First I want to tell you about superstitions. I love the topic of superstitions; I think it's very interesting. So, what a superstition is, is it is a belief, and this belief, it's usually cultural, but it can also be personal. Okay? And this belief is not based in science, so it's not scientific. Oftentimes when we're talking about superstitions we're talking about supernatural things, we're talking about good luck, bad luck, curses, you know, we're talking about things maybe from our culture's history and a different way of seeing the world. So if you're confused about superstitions, don't worry, when I give you examples you will start to really understand what a superstition is. Okay, so let's start off with an example. Imagine this: I took a test and I did really well. I got a very high score on my test. Now, why did I get a high score? Maybe you think: "Oh, you probably studied well." Okay? So that might be kind of a scientific explanation. "Oh, Emma studied, so she did well on her test." Well, maybe I brought a pen to the test and it's a very lucky pen or a very lucky pencil, and I think anytime I use this pen or pencil I'm going to do well. It's my lucky charm, it's my lucky pen or pencil. If you think I did well on my test because I have a lucky pen, then that would be an example of a superstition. It's like a ritual you do to get good luck or to keep bad luck from happening, and it's a belief about these types of things. Okay? So, if for example, I say: "I did great on my test because I brought a lucky pen to class.", "I did really well on my test because it was, you know, at 7pm and 7 is a lucky number so therefore, you know, 7pm means I'm going to do well on my test. And I wore green, and green's a lucky colour, so all these reasons helped me on my test", you would say I'm superstitious. Okay? So, "superstition" is a belief, it's a cultural belief that explains something in the world, but not based in science. A person is "superstitious". We use "superstitious" to describe people. My mother is the most superstitious person I know. She is very superstitious. In our house there are many superstitions. Okay? And that's true. I grew up in a very superstitious household. So let's look at some Western superstitions I grew up with. These are the ones that were in my own experience and my own culture. So, one example of a superstition is if you walk under a ladder, this is very bad luck. Okay? So when I walk down the street, if I see a ladder, I never walk under it because I'm also very superstitious. If you find a penny, so a penny is a type of... It's a type of currency or a type of... It's a form of money, it's a coin, and if you find a penny... If I ever find a penny, I always pick it up. Okay? I pick it up off the ground because I think the penny will give me good luck. Okay? A little crazy, I know, but a lot of people in North America do this. 13 is considered a very unlucky number. In Western culture you'll notice a lot of apartment buildings do not have a 13th floor, and that's because people think it's so... They think it's very unlucky, so they don't want to live on the 13th floor because they think they will, you know, have bad luck. I know in China the number 4 is very unlucky, and so it's the same thing. In China you don't see... In apartment buildings you usually don't see a 4th floor because it's very unlucky. Okay, so we've talked about some good luck and some bad luck.
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Learn English: 11 ‘mind’ expressions Learn English: 11 ‘mind’ expressions
9 months ago En
Did you know that there are A LOT of expressions in English with the word "mind" in them? "Mind" is a very common word with several different meanings. In this video, I will teach you the three main ways in which "mind" is used in expressions, and then I'll give you 11 very common expressions using the word. The expressions I'll teach you include: Do you mind?, Would you mind?, What's on your mind?, my mind went blank, mind the gap, have someone in mind, give a piece of my mind, lose one's mind, cross one's mind, make up one's mind, and keep in mind. By learning these expressions, you will improve both your listening and speaking. TEST YOURSELF WITH THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/11-mind-expressions/ Hello. My name is Emma and in today's lesson I am going to teach you a bunch of new vocabulary expressions. These expressions are all very common and very useful. So, the expressions we're going to learn today all have the word "mind" in them. Okay? And there are a lot. I'm not even covering all of them because there are so many expressions in English with the word "mind", so we're only going to cover some of them, but we're going to cover the main ones. Okay, so, when we talk about "mind", there are different ways we're talking about mind. "Mind" can have to do with the brain and with thinking or thoughts. Okay? So, sometimes when we're talking about mind we're talking about our brain or we're talking about our thoughts. Sometimes we're talking about something totally different with mind. Sometimes when we're talking about mind we're actually talking about being polite. For example: "Do you mind?" this is something where you're being polite. And then we also use "mind" when we're telling somebody to pay attention to something. For example: "Mind the gap" or "Mind the hole". So we have these three times where we're using "mind" and we have a lot of different expressions for each of these different categories. So we're going to go over each of these. I'm going to teach you a bunch of expressions where "mind" has to do with thought or brain, I'll teach you a lot of expressions where it has to do with politeness, and then I'm going to teach you a lot of "mind" expressions that have to do with paying attention. But this is pretty much one way you can look at these expressions. So let's get started by talking about... When we're talking about mind, and thoughts, and the brain. So, first, when we talk about "mind" one meaning of "mind" can have to do with pretty much the brain, but it's not exactly the brain. Okay? So your brain is in your head and it's a physical thing. You can touch the brain, you can feel the brain, you can see the brain, smell the brain, so it's physical. Mind is not physical. You can't see the mind because the mind is where your thoughts are, where your memories are, and these are things you can't really see or feel, but they're somewhere in here; we just can't see them because they're not physical. So, for example: Einstein, very famous scientist: "Einstein had a brilliant mind." Okay? So this means Einstein had brilliant thoughts, he was very smart. He had, you know, brilliant ideas. These things are all in his mind. So it's similar to brain, although not exactly the same thing, it's very similar to brain. We can also say: "psychologist". A psychologist is a job and people who are psychologists, they study the human mind, meaning they look at the brain and they look at people's memories, they look at the way people have ideas, and they think about: "Where do these things come from?" Okay? So they study the human mind. So, a lot of the times when we use the word "mind", we're talking about kind of your brain and your thoughts. You know, we might say: "Oh, Beethoven had an incredible mind", or you know: "In your opinion, which minds were the greatest of the 20th century? Who had the greatest mind?" Meaning: Who had the greatest ideas, and thoughts, and pretty much brain? Okay, so that's "mind". Now, let's look at another way we use "mind" and that's in the expression: "on someone's mind". So this is a very common expression. In English we often ask: "What's on your mind?" Or we also say: "I have a lot on my mind." So, what does: "on my mind" mean? And make sure you have "on someone's mind", so it can be: "on my mind", "on your mind", "on her mind", "on John's mind", you can pretty much put any person here. What does it mean? Well, when we talk about "on our mind" we're usually talking about problems, so we're usually talking about problems that we are thinking about. These are thoughts, we're thinking about something so it's on our mind.
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Learn English: “How come?” Learn English: “How come?”
10 months ago En
“How come?” is a very, very common English expression that is important to learn. It is used all the time, but many textbooks and teachers don't teach it, because it is informal. In this simple video, I will teach you what “how come” means, how to use it, and when to use it. After watching, take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/how-come/ to make sure you've got it! TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you a very important expression for conversation. That expression is: "How come?" It's a very popular expression you may see in movies, on TV, or in conversation with English speakers. But it's a very good one to know because we do use it a lot. So, what does "How come?" mean? Okay, well, first I have a question for you. I have here two sentences. "Why did you miss your plane?" and "How come you missed your plane?" What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? Maybe you already know. Okay? So take a guess. The difference in meaning is actually they mean the same thing. "How come?" is another way to say "Why?". It's just a little bit more informal. Okay? So if you're writing, you're going to use "Why?", but if you're speaking you can use both. Okay? "How come?" is informal, it's an informal way to say "Why?" And so, by informal, I mean you use it with your friends, with, you know, people you're talking to on the street, but you wouldn't use it in an essay. Okay? Or for school. Okay, so: "How come?" means: "Why?" So, when we're asking: "How come?" what we're asking about is... we want to know why something happened or the reasons why something happened. Okay? So, for example: "How come you missed your plane?" You know, a reason might be: "Oh, I was late getting to the airport" or "I slept in." Okay? So these would be the answers to a question like: "How come?" So, a lot of the time, teachers will ask this question. "You were late for class today. How come?" That means the teacher wants to know why you were late for class. So now let's look at the grammar of "How come?" and how we can use it in a sentence. Okay, so again, "How come?" is an informal way to say: "Why?" So, we often use it in conversation. Now let's look at the grammar of "How come?" and how we make a sentence with "How come?" So, I have here: "How come", which is at the beginning, and then we have plus the subject. A subject is... It can be: "I", "you", "he", "she", "they", "we", or it can also be a thing, a place, or a person, but it's the doer of a sentence. Then we have the verb. So, for example: "play", "take", "listen", "sing", "eat", these are all verbs. And then finally we have an object, which comes after the verb in regular English sentences and usually those can be people, they can be places, they can be things, so these are the objects. If this is confusing, let's look at some examples, maybe that will help. So, for example: "How come you"-is the subject-"take"-is the verb, and the object is-"the bus"? "How come you take the bus?" This means the same thing as: "Why do you take the bus?" So, here I actually have this written: "Why do you take the bus?" And you'll actually notice "How come" is easier in terms of grammar than "Why". If you look here: "Why do you take the bus?" you have this word, here: "do". Okay? In other sentences we say: "Why does he" or "Why didn't he", but there's always something like: "do", "does", "did", "didn't" here with "Why". And a lot of students forget to put this here. A lot of students will say: "Why you take the bus?" But this is not correct English. For "Why" we always need something here. Now, the nice thing about "How come" is you don't need this. Okay? If you look at "How come", if you can make an English sentence: "you take the bus", you can change this into "Why" just by adding "How come". So, the structure of this is just like a regular English sentence. We have the subject, the verb, and the object, and then we just add "How come" at the front of it. So let's look at another example: "How come Toronto isn't the capital of Canada?" So, again, we have: "How come", we have "Toronto" which is the subject, we have "isn't" which is the verb, and we have "the capital", which is the object. So, if you want to make a regular sentence, I would just say: "Toronto isn't the capital", we can just add "How come" to this, and then it becomes a question, meaning: "Why isn't Toronto the capital?" "How come John didn't come?" Okay? So here we have "How come" at the beginning, "John" which is the subject, and "didn't come", because it's negative form we have "didn't" here, so this is the past, past tense. "Didn't come" is the verb. Okay? This sentence doesn't have an object. Not all sentences in English need objects. The main thing is that you have a subject and a verb. Okay, so that might be a little confusing for you.
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Learn 14 GO Expressions in English Learn 14 GO Expressions in English
11 months ago En
How's it going? What's going on? There we go! What do these expressions have in common? They all have the word "go" in them. These expressions are especially useful for conversation. Sometimes we can use "go" to indicate changes, like with "go grey" and "go mad". In many other cases we use "go" in set expressions such as "go for it" and "here we go again!". In this video, you'll learn the following expressions: "How's it going", "how you going", "what's going on", "it's going well", "something is going on", "go crazy", "go bald", "there you go", "there we go", "here you go", "here we go again", "go for it", "way to go", and "go out of your way". Who knew there were so many "go" expressions in English? Try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/learn-14-go-expressions-in-english/ to practice these important expressions. and improve your English speaking. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you some very important conversational English. I'm going to teach you some expressions we use a lot, and all of these expressions have one thing in common: They all use the word "go". So, "go" is one of the first words you probably will learn in English. We use it when we talk about going to a different place, so for example: I go to school or I go to the park. So, we have "go" and it has that meaning, but it also can have a lot of other meanings in English, and those are the ones we're going to look at today. So, again, we use it a lot in conversation. So let's get started with some of the most basic ways we use "go" in conversation. So I have here the question. One of the first questions you ask a person when you meet them or when you see them, and that is: "How are you?" We often use "go" in a way that means the same thing as this, so we often say: "How's it going?" "How's it going?" means the same thing as: "How are you?" Notice that there is an apostrophe and an "s". This actually is: "How is it going?" but we like to use a contraction in conversation. It's a little bit more informal, so we would probably use this with maybe our friends or our family, or you know, somebody we meet but maybe not in a job interview. Okay? So we use this a lot: "How's it going?" If you are in Australia, you might see: "How you going?" We would not say this in North America, I don't think we say this in England, but in Australia you will often hear people say: "How you going?" and that means the same thing as: "How are you?" Okay? I was very confused when I went to Australia. I thought that, you know, people were making grammar mistakes, but it turns out that this is actually a very common way in Australia to say: "How are you?" Another thing we can use with "go" is if we want to find out how something specific, you know, how is something. So, for example, maybe your friend has just started taking some new classes, you might say to them: "How are your classes going?" or "How is your job going?", "How...?" You know, if you're talking about the past: "How did the interview go?" So we often use "how" with, you know, some event or situation, and "going" to ask how did it... Like, you know, how... How it was. Okay? And you'll see this a lot. Okay, so these are some of the ways we use "go" when we're talking about how someone is, and we will come back to this one, but let's talk about some of the responses first. When somebody says: "How are you?" you often respond with: "I'm fine." So it's the same thing with when somebody asks you: "How's it going?" You can say: "I'm fine", but you can also use "go" in your response, so you can say: -"How's it going?" -"It's going well." or "It's going good." I know that's not, you know, great grammar, but we do use "good" a lot when people ask us how we're doing, like, in conversational English, not in written English. But yeah: "It's going well", "It's going good", "It's going amazing", "It's going terrible". Okay? So you can use different adjectives here to describe how you're feeling or how your day is going. You know, you can also just talk generally. You can say: "It's" or you can also say: "Everything" or "Things". There are many variations of this. You might say: -"How's it going?" -"Everything is going amazing." or: "Things are great.", "Things are going good." Okay? So there's a lot of variation. If somebody asks you how, you know: "How are your classes going?" or "How is...? How is work going?" your answer could also be: "My classes are going great.", "Work is going great." You know: "School is going amazing." Or maybe, you know: "School's going terrible." Okay? So you can use this in a lot of different ways. We also have this question which people sometimes ask when, you know, they see you and, you know, maybe it's your friend and they're meeting you, they might say: "Hey. What's going on?" Okay? So: "What's going on?" This one you've got to be careful with, because: "What's going on?" can have multiple meanings, and it all depends on the way you say it.
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Say what you mean! Simple English words that learners often say incorrectly Say what you mean! Simple English words that learners often say incorrectly
11 months ago En
Are you pronouncing the words "man" and "men" correctly? How about "word" and "world"? In this video, I will teach the pronunciation of words that are often mispronounced and confused with each other. The words I will cover in this video are "word and "world"; "walk" and "work"; "bird" and "beard"; "man" and "men"; and "woman" and "women". Watch this video for pronunciation tips on how to say these words like a native English speaker. Try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/simple-english-words-learners-say-incorrectly/ to practice what you've learned. TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to improve your pronunciation by looking at pronunciation problems. A lot of students confuse words; or sometimes two words, they sound similar, and students confuse the pronunciation of those words. Okay? So in this video we're going to look at five different sets of words, and I'm going to explain how to pronounce them, and: What are the differences in their pronunciation? So let's get started. The first word that I want to practice is the difference between "word" and "world". Okay? I know a lot of students have a lot of difficulty, especially with "world" because you have the "r" and the "l", which is really challenging for a lot of students. So let's learn how to pronounce these two different words. With "word", I've written here the International Phonetic Alphabet spelling. If you know this, great; if you don't, don't worry about it. This is just, if you do know this, this is how the word is in the IPA alphabet, the International Phonetic Alphabet. So if you want to pronounce this word, the first thing I want you to do is make an "er" sound. Can you do that? "Er". "Er", kind of like: "her", "er". Okay? Now what I want you to do is say the word: "were", "were", "they were", okay? Now, if we add a "d" here: "werd", "werd". Okay? Can you say that? "Werd". One thing that can help you sometimes is with rhymes. If you know something that rhymes with the word it can also help you with the pronunciation. So this is the past tense of "hear": "I heard". Can you say the word: "heard"? "Heard". "I heard the word". So you see these have the same sound: "word", "heard". So the very basic part of this is if you can make the "er" sound, that's the very basic part of it: "er", "word". This is also a kind of short sound: "word". Now, I want you to compare that to this sound: "world". Okay? This sound is a little bit longer for this word. "World". So I have it here in the IPA or the International Phonetic Alphabet. Now, again, these two have the same vowel sound: "er", so I want you to start with the pronunciation of this word by making this sound: "er", "er". Okay? Now, again, I want you to make the sound: "were", "were", "they were". Okay, now here's where it might get a bit tricky for some of you because of the "l", I want you to add an "l" to this sound. "Werl", "werl". Okay? And at the very end, your tongue when you make the "l" should be touching the roof of your mouth: "werl". Okay. Now we're going to add the "d": "werld", "werld". Okay? So now let's compare these two. I want you to say after me: "word", "world", "word", "world". Do you hear the difference? Okay. So this is something you can practice. Again, start with the "er" sound, that will really help you in the pronunciation of this. Now let's look at some other words that are commonly confused. Okay, so the next sounds or words that are very commonly confused in their pronunciation are the words: "walk" and "work". Okay? Many students pronounce these as the same, but they're quite different. So let's look at "walk" first. Okay? So, again, I've written the International Phonetic Alphabet, if you know it; and if you don't know it, that's totally fine, you don't need to know it for this lesson. This is just if you know it. So, one of the main mistakes people make with the word "walk" is with the "l". Okay? Some students, they try to pronounce the "l" and they'll say: "wallk". The "l" is silent; we do not say the "l" at all. Okay? So, imagine this is the word "walk"... Well, it is the word "walk". I'm just going to remove that. So, it looks more like: "w-a-k", "wak". Okay, so the first sound I want to practice is the vowel sound because this is where a lot of students have problems, is with the vowel sound. It's an "aw" sound, okay? So, I want you to remember when you last went to your doctor. Okay? So imagine you're at the doctor's and they want to look inside your mouth, you have to make a sound, you say: "Aw". Right? When you go to the doctor's you say: "Aw". I want you to make that sound: "Aw", "aw". Okay? Notice my mouth is very open for this sound. It's not closed. It's: "aw". Okay, so you need to make that sound to make this word. Now I want you to say: "wa", "wa". All right? It's not a relaxed sound. Your mouth is very... It feels like you're doing work with it: "wa", "wa"
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How SENTENCE STRESS changes meaning in English How SENTENCE STRESS changes meaning in English
2 years ago En
What is sentence stress? How does it change the meaning of a sentence? In this video, I will teach you how saying a word louder and longer in a sentence can change the sentence's meaning. Many English learners don't listen for sentence stress and as a result, they don't fully understand what someone is saying. I will teach you how to recognize sentence stress and how it can change meaning. Then we will practice listening to sentences with different word stress and examine their meanings together. I'll share many examples so you'll be able to hear how native speakers use sentence stress, and how you can do it too! At the end of this video, you can practice more with our quiz at https://www.engvid.com/sentence-stress-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you how to become a better listener, and I'm going to do that by teaching you about something called "Sentence Stress". Okay? So I want you to think about the times you've listened to English, maybe in a movie, maybe you saw a movie, or maybe a TV show - was there ever a time where you didn't understand something? Maybe everybody laughed, maybe somebody suddenly got angry and you felt like you missed some of the meaning to why something happened. It might be because you're not listening enough to sentence stress. So, what is sentence stress? Well, let me show you. When we talk about stress in language, we're talking about making something louder and longer. Okay? So, for example, if I say the number "thirteen" versus "thirteen", even though they sound similar, they're different because I've put a different stress or a different emphasis on each part of the word. So this is in part a pronunciation lesson, but also really about listening and how to listen better. So I have here a sentence: "I love studying English." Now, it seems like a pretty straightforward sentence, but I can actually change the meaning of this sentence using sentence stress. Okay? So, by saying different parts of the sentence louder and longer I can actually change the meaning. So I'm going to give you an example. "I love studying English." What part did I say louder and longer? If you said: "I", you're correct, so I'm going to put a mark here to show sentence stress. "I love studying English." If you heard somebody say this it means that I love studying English, but my friend doesn't. Or I love studying English, but other people hate studying English. So I'm really emphasizing that I am, you know, maybe one of the only people. Okay? So, I love studying English. Now, this is a bit of a different meaning than if we move the stress-so I'll just erase that-to the word "love". Okay? So I want you to listen to how I say this: "I love studying English." So in this case "love" is the part I'm saying louder and longer. Okay? And now it has a different meaning. Even though it's the same sentence, just by saying a different part louder and longer I've changed the meaning. So: "I love studying English." What does that mean? If I'm focused on the word "love" it means I really want to emphasize that I don't just like English, I love English. English is my passion. I love it. I really, really, really like it a lot. Okay? Now, if we take the stress here and we move it to "studying": "I love studying English", okay? So now you hear "studying" is louder and longer, again, now we have a different meaning from when I said: "I love studying English", "I love studying English", "I love studying English", each of these means a different thing. "I love studying English" means I only love studying English. I'm emphasizing maybe I don't like using English, maybe I don't like, you know, English in conversation. Maybe I only like reading my book about English, but I don't actually like using it. Okay? Now, if we change the stress to "English" and now "English" is going to be louder and longer... Okay? So, for example: "I love studying English", "English" is louder and longer, now this has a new meaning, a fourth meaning. "I love studying English" means only English. Maybe I hate all other languages. I don't like studying French, I don't like studying Portuguese, I don't like studying Arabic. I only like studying English. Okay? So, as you can see, the way we pronounce these sentences adds meaning to them. It's not just the words that have meaning, it's also the way we use our voice, our intonation. Okay, so we're going to do some practice listening. I'm going to say a sentence and you're going to first listen to: What part of the sentence has the stress? What part of the stress is louder and longer? Okay? So let's do that with the next sentence first. Okay? "I like your painting. I like your painting." What part was the loud part? What part was the long part? "I like your painting." If you said: "your", you are correct. This part has the stress. Now, I have three different meanings that this sentence could mean. It could mean it's an okay painting. Okay?
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Stop procrastinating and start learning! Stop procrastinating and start learning!
2 years ago En
Do spend time on Facebook or Instagram when you should be studying? Do you clean your desk when you have a test the next day? Do you get distracted when you have something important to do? Most people have a hard time concentrating and focusing on their work and studies. This leads to stress and a lot of wasted time. In this video, I'll talk about what causes procrastination, and share the best scientific research on how to overcome it. If you learn even one thing from this video, you'll become a better learner and get so much more done. I've been using these tips in my own life, and want to share these secrets for success! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/stop-procrastinating-start-learning/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and I have a question for you. I want you to imagine this. Imagine you have a big English test that's going to happen very soon. What do you do? Okay? And I want you to be honest. Do you open up your book and study right away, and every day study for your test? Do you think about your test, feel a little bit sad and maybe go on Facebook? Do you, instead of studying, text your friends? Or do you think about studying, but instead just watch TV? Okay, a lot of students will say that they open up their book and study, but in reality a lot of people don't do this. A lot of people before tests or presentations or work get really, really nervous, and they do something different. Okay? They don't want to do the studying, they don't want to do the hard work, they're really afraid to do it so instead they do something like go on Facebook, call their friends, go to the mall. Okay? These are all examples, two, three, and four that is... These three are examples of procrastination. Okay? So, "procrastination" is maybe a new word for you, but it's a very, very important word if you are a student or, you know, even if you work. It's actually an important word for everybody because most people procrastinate. So what does procrastination mean? Well, it's when you have something you have to do, but instead of doing what you have to do, you do something else that's more fun, and you keep thinking: "I'll come back to this", but you're very busy with these other things. So let's look at some examples of the word procrastination. We have it as a verb, an action: "I am procrastinating." Because I'm not studying, I'm on Facebook, I'm procrastinating. "I'm not studying. I procrastinate a lot." Here we have another verb form. Okay? "I procrastinate a lot", which means: I don't study, I don't do my English homework; instead, I spend a lot of time texting my friends and doing anything but English. I can also use it as a noun: "My procrastination is really bad." Okay? My procrastination is bad. I have a problem with procrastination. So this means I have a problem getting stuff done because I don't really want to do it, I'd rather focus on doing Facebook or something else. Or we can also have it as a noun to say what we are. "I'm a procrastinator." A procrastinator is a person. Okay? So I'm a teacher, that's a person. When I was in university sometimes I was a procrastinator. This means before any big test or presentation I'd start working on it, and then I'd do something else because I'm a procrastinator. Okay? So let's... We're going to talk about why people procrastinate, and then we're going to talk about how to fight procrastination. Okay? Because it's something we all need to fight. Okay, so why do people procrastinate? That's a very good question. Okay? So, different people procrastinate for different reasons, but usually a lot of the times people have the same reasons for procrastinating. People procrastinate when they think something is difficult. Okay? So for me I find math difficult, so when I used to do math I would procrastinate and I would do something else like, you know, make a sandwich or clean my room even because the math seemed so difficult to me, anything was better than doing the math. So I would always get distracted. A lot of people find English grammar difficult, and when they're studying grammar a lot of the times they procrastinate, they text their friends or they, you know, do anything but grammar. Boring. A lot of people procrastinate when something is boring. They don't want to do it because it's... You know, they want to do something interesting. People procrastinate when something is a lot of work. Okay? And they know it's a lot of work, so they look at the task and it's just too much, so then they want to feel good, so they do something else. A lot of people also procrastinate just because they're scared or they're afraid. They want to do something well, and they don't think that they can so it well, so you know... Or, you know, they're worried about making mistakes, so a lot of the times people procrastinate because of fear.
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Have better conversations using the FORD method Have better conversations using the FORD method
2 years ago En
Don't know what to talk about with someone? Do you hate uncomfortable silence? Want to become a better conversationalist? In this video, I will teach you the FORD method of conversation. "FORD" stands for Family, Occupation, Recreation, and Dreams. These are perfect topics for conversing with anyone, including people you don't know very well. I will give you many examples of FORD questions to ask. You can use these questions to keep a conversation going and connect with people. FORD is a great tool for anyone who wants to improve their small talk skills and become more likeable. https://www.engvid.com/ford-method-small-talk/ TRANSCRIPT ello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to be better at conversation and speaking. Okay? So, in this video I'm going to teach you about how to become better at conversation with a technique. We call the technique "F-O-R-D" or "FORD". This technique will really help you if you're shy, if when you meet people for the first time you don't know what to say, if you feel very uncomfortable at parties or in meetings or any social events. This is a great technique. Even if you're amazing at socializing, this video can still really help you even improve more than what you already can do. So let's get started. Okay, so the first thing I want to talk about is we use FORD as a way of small talk. So, what is small talk? Okay? Small talk is the type of conversation we have with people we don't know well or strangers. So, you might make small talk with your neighbours, you might make small talk with your boss, with your colleagues, maybe if you're, you know, going to a coffee shop you might make small talk with the store clerk. So, you make small talk with people you don't know well and it's just a way to make people feel comfortable in conversation and to create a connection with people. A lot of conversation is small talk. If anyone has ever talked to you about the weather, sports, you know, all sorts of different topics - these are usually small talk topics. So, again, you might make small talk at parties, in elevators, at meetings, even if you're taking English classes you will probably make small talk there as well. So, how do we get good at small talk? What do we talk about when we don't know what to talk about? Well, that's where FORD comes in. FORD is a technique which will help you know what to talk about when you really have no idea. So maybe this has been you before. Okay? Maybe this is you: "What should I talk about? Ah." Or, you know, maybe it's just a bunch of question marks. "I don't know what to say." It's totally silent. It's awkward. So, how can we fix this situation? Well, FORD stands for four things. "F" stands for "family". You can talk about family, and I'm going to give you some great questions you can use to ask about somebody's family. "O" stands for "occupation" or job. I'm going to give you some great questions about occupation that you can ask somebody you don't know well to keep the conversation going. "R" stands for "recreation", this is like hobbies, sports, movies, Netflix, TV. Okay? So I'm going to give you some great questions for hobbies or recreation. And finally, "D" stands for "dreams". This is when you ask somebody about their future goals or, you know, something they want to do. This does not... Dreams does not mean when you go to sleep, if you have some weird dream and you share it with somebody. I'm not talking about that. I'm talking about your dreams in life. What are your goals? Okay? So using the FORD technique will make you better at small talk. So, now let's look at some specific questions you can ask when you're socializing with somebody who you don't know that well. Okay, so again, the "F" in FORD stands for "family". Family is a great thing to talk about, but remember to keep it light and easy. Okay? You want to talk about things people are comfortable with. So don't ask them any private questions, you know, like: "Oh, is it true so-and-so cheated on so-and-so?" No, no, no. Keep it light, simple, and easy. And also share about your own family, too. Okay? That's also very important. You don't want to sound like the FBI interrogating somebody. You want to have a conversation, so each time they say something, you can say something about yourself. So keep it kind of balanced. Okay, so one easy question you can talk about: "Where are you from originally?" Okay? "Where are you from? Are you from Toronto? Are you from Tokyo? Are you from Istanbul? Where are you from?" This question is great because you can really talk about the difference between your cities and, you know, maybe some of your experiences growing up. Similarly: "Where did you grow up?" A lot of people have moved a lot, so maybe they were born in this city, then they moved to Mexico, and then they moved here. So that's also another interesting question.
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15 ways to improve your English pronunciation 15 ways to improve your English pronunciation
2 years ago En
Problems with your English pronunciation? In this lesson, I will give you lots of advice, practical tips, and resources to help you improve. After watching this video, you will have a deeper understanding of what is important for proper English pronunciation. I will teach you proven methods to become a better English speaker. https://www.engvid.com/15-ways-to-improve-your-english-pronunciation/
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Get a better job: Power Verbs for Resume Writing Get a better job: Power Verbs for Resume Writing
2 years ago En
Need to find a job? Writing a resume? Then you need to know about power verbs. These verbs will improve your resume and make you appear more professional. In this lesson, You will learn what power verbs are and how we use them in resumes. You will also see many examples of common power verbs, and I'll give you some of my best tips on resume writing in general. I will also teach you about weaker verbs like "did" and "make", which should often be avoided on resumes. After watching this video, you can take my quiz on power verbs and check out our helpful power verb resource page, which lists many common power verbs for different jobs. Good luck with your job hunt! CHECK THE RESOURCE PAGE WITH LOTS OF POWER VERBS YOU CAN USE: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/power-verbs-in-english/ TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/power-verbs-resume-writing/ TRANSCRIPT: Coming soon!
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English Phrasal Verbs for LOVE, SEX, and DATING! English Phrasal Verbs for LOVE, SEX, and DATING!
2 years ago En
Are you looking for love? Or maybe you're already in a relationship and want to talk about it? In this video, you will learn common English phrasal verbs we use when we are talking about love and dating. You will learn phrasal verbs that have to do with relationships and romance. Use these with that special boy or girl that you like! It will also help you to understand conversations that you hear in TV shows and movies. You will learn expressions like: "go out", "check out", "hit on", "make out", "cheat on", and many more! Try my quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-phrasal-verbs-love-sex-dating/ to practice what you learned in this video. Good luck! TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video we are talking about love and dating. I'm going to teach you some very good vocabulary you can use when you're talking about boyfriends, girlfriends, people you like. You will see these words maybe on TV, in movies, especially if you like romantic comedies, these words come out... Up a lot. So, specifically, what I am going to teach you is phrasal verbs that have to do with love, as well as dating. Okay? So you might be wondering: "What is a phrasal verb?" Good question. So, if you know what a verb is, a verb is an action. Okay? So some examples of verbs are: "play", "listen", "look", "eat". These are all different verbs. A phrasal verb is a little bit different. The reason a phrasal verb is different is because you have the verb and a preposition. Okay? So what's a preposition? A preposition is a word like: "on", "off", "over", "under", "above", "below", "at", "in". These are all prepositions. Okay? So, the thing about a phrasal verb is when you have a verb... Imagine the verb "get", if we add a preposition to it, it changes the meaning of the verb. So, for example, we have: "get on", "get off", "get over", "get under". Okay? "Get above". We have all these different phrasal verbs with "get" and each one has different meanings, and the meaning is really in the preposition. Okay? So, we have tons of these in English and we use them a lot in conversation. So today we're going to look at some ones that have to do with dating. So, let's give some examples. Okay? I have here: "hit on". "Hit on" is a phrasal verb. We have "hit", which is the verb, and "on" which is the proposition. Okay? So before we continue I just wanted to point out one thing. There are different types of phrasal verbs. So we have phrasal verbs where the verb and the preposition are together, there's nothing in between them. So: "hit on" is an example of this. You see "hit" and "on", they're together. There's nothing in here. There's no person, there's no object. "Hit" and "on", the preposition and the verb are together. Now, there is also a different type of phrasal verb where you have the verb, and then there's something in between the verb, and then there's the preposition. So, for example, another phrasal verb we will look at today: "check out". You have: "Check her out." So you actually have the verb, the preposition, but there is something in between the verb and the preposition. In this case we have a person. In other cases it might be an object. Okay? There's also a third type of phrasal verb where pretty much with the third type you have a choice. You can either put the phrasal verb together or it can be separate. Today, we're mainly, though, looking at either ones that are together like "hit on", or ones that are separated by a person or a thing, such as: "Check her out." If you're a little bit confused, don't worry because we will be looking at so many examples of what I'm talking about today so you will really understand this concept. Okay, so let's look at "hit on" and the meaning of "hit on". So I have here the sentence: "Dave hit on me." Okay? So we have "hit", which is the verb, "on", which is the preposition. They're always together. And what this means is it means Dave said something to me, he told me that I was maybe beautiful or pretty, and maybe he asked me for my phone number. When you hit on somebody, it means that you're showing somebody that you're interested in them. Okay? So if you ever have seen any movies where you have people in bars or at clubs, you... And this can also be for real life, too, you might have a man go up to a woman and hit on her, meaning he says to the woman: "Can I buy you a drink?" Or, you know: "Can I talk to you? I think you're very beautiful." So this is "hit on". It means you're telling somebody or you're showing somebody that you are interested in them. Okay? Okay, the next one I wanted to look at, the next phrasal verb is: "check out". So: "The man checked her out." What does this mean? When somebody checks you out, it means they're looking at you in a certain way. "Check out", when we're talking about dating, really has to do with the eyes.
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English Listening Practice: Improve your vocabulary! English Listening Practice: Improve your vocabulary!
2 years ago En
Want to practice your listening and learn some new vocabulary? In this video, you will play an English listening game. First, I will teach you some new vocabulary and review English prepositions which we will use in our fun listening practice. Next, you will listen to me describe a picture and you will draw the picture. At the end of the lesson, you can see how well you listened to my instructions. Are our pictures the same or different? You can listen to this video as many times as you like to get more practice and you can play this listening activity with your friends or classmates. Try my quiz at the end to see how many new words you remember. https://www.engvid.com/english-listening-practice-vocabulary-prepositions/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and today we have a great lesson plan for you. In today's lesson we are going to practice listening. Okay? We're going to practice listening, and we're also going to learn some new words, we're going to learn about shapes, as well as prepositions. Okay? So, in this video you will also get to do a listening activity and I'll explain a little bit about that in a moment. So first we are going to learn shapes, and these are some examples of shapes, then we are going to learn about prepositions. You might be wondering: "What is a preposition?" Well, a preposition is a short word like: "on", "above", "below". And after that we're going to do a listening activity where you're going to listen to me describe shapes and prepositions. For the listening activity you will need two things: A piece of paper and a pencil or a pen. This is an active video so you will actually be doing something while watching. Okay, so let's get started on shapes. So I have here some major shapes in English. We have a triangle, we have a circle, square, a heart, and this one is a star. In our listening activity later, you will be drawing a triangle, a circle, a square, a heart, and a star. Okay? So these are the words we'll be using in this video. We will also be using some prepositions. So a preposition is a short word that shows the relationship between two things. So that's confusing to a lot of students. An easier way I like to think about prepositions is they can... They can describe where something is. Okay? So they often answer the question of: Where? So, for example, I have here our triangle and our circle, and I have the preposition "on". So if we look at this, I could say: "There is a triangle on a circle." So: "There is a triangle on a circle." So we will be using the preposition "on" later in our listening activity. We also have "inside". "There is a triangle inside a circle." Another preposition is "outside". We can say: "There is a triangle outside the circle." So, here, the triangle is inside, whereas here the triangle is outside. So these are very common prepositions we use when describing where something is. Okay, we also have "above". So, "above" is a little bit different than "on". If you notice the circle, the triangle is on the circle, meaning it's touching, whereas when we're looking at "above" it can be touching, but it can also be just above. So it can touch or it can also just be above. So, for example, we have a triangle above a circle. Okay, now we have "below" and "under", two more common prepositions which we usually use in the same way. So we have here the circle. We can say: "There is a circle". Or actually we can say: "There is a triangle below the circle." Or: "There is a triangle under the circle." Okay? And now we have "to the right". We can say: "There is a triangle to the right of the circle." So notice how they're beside? This side is to the right, whereas this side is to the left. So if we look at the triangle, the triangle is beside the circle and it's also to the right of the circle. Now, compare this to "to the left". We have a triangle and a circle, and we can say: "The triangle now is to the left of the circle." Okay? So these two are opposites: "to the right" and "to the left". So these pictures help you understand these prepositions, which answer the question of: Where? So, again, we have: "on", "inside", "outside", "above", "below/under", "to the right", and "to the left". Okay, now, for the listening activity we are about to do, there are three more expressions that you will need. You will need to know: "in the center". Okay? So if I'm looking at this board, about here is in the center. Okay? So I can say: "My finger is in the center of the board." I can also say about corners. We have a corner, a corner, another corner, and another corner. Okay? So those are called corners. If I'm looking at my piece of paper from earlier, we have a corner here, a corner here, a corner here, and a corner here. So, what I can say is... If I ask you to draw something, I might tell you to draw something in the top corner, which might be here.
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How to use "ABOUT TO" in English How to use "ABOUT TO" in English
2 years ago En
What you are about to learn will be very useful when speaking English! In this video, we will look at "about to", a term we use when talking about the near future. It describes something someone plans to do very soon. I will teach you when to use "about to" and how to use it correctly. Try my quiz at the end of the lesson to make sure you understand. I hope you are about to click on this video! https://www.engvid.com/about-to/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and I am about to teach you "about to". Okay? So, "about to", what does it mean and how do we use it? Well, let's look at an example to really understand this. "I am about to clean my room." I want you to think for a moment. Do you think this sentence is about the past, the present, or the future? So: "I am about to clean my room." If you said this is about the future, you are correct. We use "about to" when we're talking about something we will do very soon in the future. We're not talking about far in the future. We usually use "will" for that. We're talking about very, very soon like in the next five minutes or in the next couple of minutes. So, I am about to give you some examples of "about to". So we have here "I" as a subject: "I am about to", and then after "about to" we have a verb. I put this in colour to help you remember it better. We have: "You are about to" and the verb. "She or he is about to" and a verb. "We are about to" and a verb. "You guys are about to" and a verb. I've put here: "You guys", which is a bit informal, but when we're talking about a group of people in an informal situation we can use: "You guys", and: "They are about to" with a verb. So what can we do with the verbs here? Well, if you look up here I have: "I am about to clean my room." We keep the verb in the infinitive in this case. "I am about to study English.", "You are about to listen to me speak.", "She is about to watch TV.", "We are about to go to the gym.", "You guys are about to listen to Justin Bieber.", "They are about to take a shower." Okay? So now let's do some together, let's put the verb in the proper form together. Okay, so just to remember: When we're talking about "about to", we're talking about the future and usually we're talking about either the immediate future, meaning the next 5-10 minutes or the next couple of hours or we can also be talking about soon. Soon is different for different people, so I might be talking about in the next couple of days or in the next couple of weeks, but what I really mean is soon. Okay? So I can say: "I am about to go on vacation", and that means soon I will go on vacation. Okay, so now let's do some examples together. "I am about to _________." How can we change this verb into the proper form? "I am about to..." Well, this was a trick question. You said: "call"-and we add a little period here-you are correct. It's very easy to use "about to". We just need the subject, "am", "about to", and the verb. All right, let's look at the next example together. "Ednan is _________ do homework." Now, I want to talk about Ednan in the immediate future, what he's going to do very soon, so what can we put here? If you said: "about to", you are correct. "Ednan is about to do his homework." Okay? Now, let's do one more: "Jess is about to _________." And here we have the verb "study". So, again, very easy. What do we write? "Jess is about to study." Which means she is going to study soon. Okay? I hope you are about to subscribe to my channel. There, you can find a lot of really great resources on all sorts of things English, including conversation, listening, speaking, IELTS. I have covered a lot of topics, so I hope you check that out. I also want to invite you to practice "about to" by visiting our website, www.engvid.com. There, you can actually do a quiz. I hope you're about to do this quiz where you can practice everything you learned today. So until next time, thanks for watching and take care.
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Read, Understand, and Remember! Improve your reading skills with the KWL Method Read, Understand, and Remember! Improve your reading skills with the KWL Method
2 years ago En
Is it difficult for you to understand or remember what you read? In this video, I will teach you an easy method that will help you become better at reading difficult material such as textbooks and journal articles. It is known as the "KWL" reading method. You will also remember more of what you read by using this method. If you plan to study at an English school, college, or university, this method will really help you. You can also use this method to help you in the IELTS and TOEFL exams. Try the KWL method yourself and tell me how it works for you in the comments! Take the quiz! https://www.engvid.com/kwl-reading-method/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you how to be a better reader. So I want you to think about your life. Are there any things that are very difficult for you to read? Maybe you have to read something in English and you really don't understand what's happening in the story. Or maybe you're in university and you're taking a very hard course and you can't read the textbook because it's really difficult and you don't know what's happening. Well, if you're having difficulty reading or even if you just want to remember what you read more and be a better studier, this video is for you. So first let's look at some things students might be reading that might be causing difficulty. Some students in their universities they have to read textbooks. If you go to university or college, or also high school, you have to do a lot of reading and you have to do a lot of complicated reading, especially for sciences, maths, history. So, this is a very good method. I'm going to teach you how to read these books better. Newspapers. Sometimes you'll be reading the newspaper and it's difficult, especially in another language. So if you're reading a newspaper and, you know, you want to be better at reading it, this video is for you. Internet sources. There's a lot of great things on the internet to read, and so this will also help you if you look reading things from the internet. Magazines. Journals, for anyone who's a professional, whether you're a doctor, a nurse, a historian, or if you're in university or college, a lot of the times you have to read something called a journal, which is something for professionals to read about their field. So it's usually modern research. These things can be very difficult to read, so if you're reading these, this is a great technique for you. If you're doing the TOEFL or IELTS. Although I wouldn't recommend using this technique on the actual exam, I think it's great for your practice tests and I'll tell you why a bit later. So you can use this when you're practicing for the TOEFL and IELTS. And finally, if you're reading Shakespeare. When I read Shakespeare I had no idea what was going on. It was very confusing, all of the old English. I found it very difficult to read. There are also a lot of books that can be very, very hard to read. So these techniques will really work for you for any of these situations and many more. So before I teach you about the KWL technique, I just want you to think about reading for a second. Okay? A lot of people when they pick up a book, that's all they do. They open it up and they start reading right away, and then they close the book and then a lot of the times they don't really remember anything they read or they don't understand what they read. So it's a lot of wasted time. I like to think of reading how I think of jogging or running. So if we look here, I have the word "running" or "jogging". If you like exercise, any type of exercise kind of follows this format. So, reading is a lot like running. What a good reader does is they have a warm up period. So if you think about running, before you go running you usually stretch. Maybe you'll do a little bit of movement to get your heart pumped. So you don't just start running. You do a warm up. The same is true with reading. The best reading... The best readers usually do a warm up. For exercise, people then usually run or jog for a certain amount of time, and then afterwards they have what we call a cooldown period. So, "cooldown" is usually when somebody wants to slow their heartrate, so maybe they walk instead of run, maybe they do more stretches, but they don't just stop what they're doing. They slowly, you know, do slower activities before they stop jogging or running. So if you think about reading like exercise, you should also have a warm up, and then you read, and then the cooldown. This is the meat. This is the main idea of the KWL method, and I'm going to teach you exactly how we can do all of this when we read.
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IELTS Writing Task 1: How to describe BAR GRAPHS IELTS Writing Task 1: How to describe BAR GRAPHS
2 years ago En
Are you preparing for the writing section of the IELTS? In this lesson, we will look at Writing Task 1, and I will teach you how to describe a bar graph. This is one question type that can be on the IELTS, so it is a good idea to prepare yourself for it. I will take you through what happens in Writing Task 1, what key grammar you can use for it, and how you can improve the organization of your description by using compare-and-contrast vocabulary. Good luck on your exam! Try my quiz at the end to practice some of the concepts from this lesson: https://www.engvid.com/ielts-writing-task-1-bar-graphs/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma and in today's video we're going to talk about the test known as the IELTS. So if you are going to be writing the IELTS, this video is for you. Now, in this video we're talking specifically about if you're writing the academic IELTS. If you're, you know, just here for general interest, you can still learn quite a bit from this video because we will be talking about different vocabulary and grammar. So this video can also help you if you're not taking the IELTS also. Okay, so what are we going to be talking about specifically in this video? Well, if you're taking the IELTS you probably know that there's a writing part of the IELTS. The writing part has two sections, we call them Writing Task 1 and Writing Task 2. In this video I'm going to cover a small bit of Writing Task 1. So, in Writing Task 1 you're going to be given some sort of visual image. Okay? So you might see something like this, this, or this. It might be a chart, it might be a table, but you're going to see some sort of visual and you need to describe what you're seeing. So this video... I've covered different types of Writing Task 1 and I'll talk about the links to some of these other videos at the end, but in this specific video we're going to be talking about bar graphs. Okay? So, first of all: What is a bar graph? Well, so I have here three different types of charts or graphs. We have this one, this one, and this one. This is called a pie chart. Okay? I've covered this in another video, so if you're interested in learning how to write about pie charts, you can check out that video. But you'll notice with a pie chart it looks kind of like a pizza or a pie. It's in a circle and it's... Has different colours representing different percents. We have here, this is called a line graph. So you'll notice that there's a line and, you know, sometimes this represents time, sometimes it represents other things, but with a line graph you'll notice, like, increases and decreases, but it's one connected line. We're not covering either of these in this video. What we're going to be covering is another thing you might see on the IELTS, which is you might be given a picture like this. This is called a bar graph or a bar chart. So we have here these rectangular-shaped things that are each a different colour. These are known as bars. Okay? So, I know a bar is a place you go to buy beer, but in this case a bar is not that, it's actually this kind of rectangle on the chart. So, on the IELTS you may get a picture of something like this. You might actually get a picture of two things together, or you might get a picture of something a lot more complicated than this. In this case we're going to talk about: What would you do and say, and what are some tips if you get a picture of a bar graph or a bar chart? Okay, so what are you going to have to do? Specifically they're going to ask you... After you get a picture like this, they're going to ask you to describe what you see. Okay? So you're describing the main information. You're also going to have to maybe make comparisons, say how things are similar or how things are different, which is contrast. So, for example, if this is, you know, different activities, maybe you might say that the red is shopping and the blue is golfing. In this case, shopping is less popular than golfing. Okay? So pretty much you need to compare the different bars and say: What are the same about them? Which ones are similar and which ones are different? You're also going to have to report any main features or trends. Okay? So maybe you'll see a pattern and you're going to have to write about, you know, some of these main points you see when you look at the visualization. You do not write your opinion. Okay? So if this is a graph on education, maybe this is elementary school, secondary school, university, master's, and like a doctorate or something - you do not write what you think about it. Okay? All you do is in this type of question you're just writing what you see and what it means. You're not writing your opinion on anything. So you should not write the words: "I think" or "In my opinion", you'll actually lose marks for this. So in task 1, no opinion; that's for task 2.
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Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 BACK VOWELS Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 BACK VOWELS
2 years ago En
You want to sound like a native speaker, but you don't know how to improve your pronunciation! Here's a little secret: the fastest way to get better pronunciation is to work on your vowel sounds. In this video, I will teach you how to pronounce four vowels that are common in both British and American English. We'll be looking at back vowels. You'll learn by seeing what my mouth, lips, and tongue are doing when I pronounce these vowel sounds, then you'll practice saying them by doing the same with your mouth. Often, English learners don't notice the difference between these sounds, and that might be why you aren't saying them correctly. We'll compare these similar vowel sounds to make those differences clear. I will show you the different spellings of these sounds in English and you will learn what the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols for these vowels are. You should also watch my other video on FRONT VOWEL SOUNDS: https://youtu.be/k98VNRLEisE Those are just as important! http://www.engvid.com/english-pronunciation-5-back-vowels/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to learn about pronunciation, specifically how to pronounce back vowels. Okay? So, whether you are learning British English, Canadian English, American English, whatever English you're learning, these sounds exist in all of them. Okay? So it doesn't matter what type of... What dialect you're learning. You will find these sounds in many different dialects. Okay, so to get started let's talk about: What are vowels? So I have here "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and sometimes "y". These are what we call vowels in English. Okay? So, these make a certain type of sound where usually you... You have a lot of air coming into your mouth from the back of your throat. So it's not so important how... Like, what a vowel is. The main thing is to remember that "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and sometimes "y" are vowels. Whatever is a letter that isn't one of these is called a consonant, so for example: "s", "t", "d", "f". These are all consonants. Okay, so let's get started by looking at this and thinking: What is a consonant and what is a vowel? So we have here the word: "drew". Can you tell me: What is the vowel in this word: "drew"? If you said this, you're correct. Okay? The "d", "r", and the "w", they're consonants, and the "e" is a vowel. We have the word here: "foot". So what's the vowel? In this case it's the o's and "f" and "t" are consonants. "Hello", the "e" is a vowel and so is the "o". "All", in this case the "a" is the vowel. "Jaw", and "clock". Okay, so these are the different vowels in English. Today we are going to be looking at four of the vowel sounds that happen in the back of your mouth. So I'll explain that in a second, but first I want you to look at these four words: "foot", "food", "foe", "flock". What is the same in these words? If you look at the spelling, all these words have an "o" in the spelling. Now, do we pronounce the "oo" the same way? Listen carefully. Is the "o" pronounced the same in each of these words? "Foot", "food", "foe", "flock". The "o" is actually pronounced differently in these words, which is why you can't always depend on spelling in English to help you with your pronunciation. Okay? So I'm going to teach you how to... You know, some tips on how to do these different pronunciations and how to know when to pronounce which sounds. Okay. So, before we get to these different vowel sounds we're going to practice today, I just wanted to tell you some general things about pronouncing vowels. A lot of students, they don't know what they're doing with their mouth when they're pronouncing. It's very important to pay attention to what your mouth is doing and what your tongue is doing when you actually pronounce something. Okay? This will really help you improve your pronunciation. It's also a good idea maybe to use a mirror in order to look and become aware of what this area is doing to make the sound. So, when you're thinking about your lips it's important to think: Are your lips spread, like: "cheese", or are your lips...? So this would be spread. Or are your lips like closer together, like: "food", "oo"? "ee", "oo", notice the difference? So that's one thing to look at: Are your lips spread like "ee" or are they close together like "oo"? Okay. How open is your mouth? Is something you want to look at. Is it not very open, like: "oo"? Or is it very open, like: "ah"? Okay? How open is your mouth? The other thing you want to pay attention to is your tongue. So, these are your lips. I'm not a great artist, I know. These are your teeth, this is your chin, your neck, and this red... Red thing is your tongue. Is your tongue touching your teeth, is your tongue touching the top of your mouth, or is your tongue hanging out kind of close to the back of your mouth?
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Improve Your Vocabulary: KNOW, MEET, MEET WITH, or MEET UP? Improve Your Vocabulary: KNOW, MEET, MEET WITH, or MEET UP?
2 years ago En
Do you know the difference between "know" and "meet"? We use these verbs in almost every conversation, so let's make sure you use them correctly! I'll teach you the meaning of "know" and "meet" as well as expressions like "meet with" and "meet up with". Sometimes the difference is between formal and informal English. In other cases, these words and expressions have very different meanings. Try the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/improve-your-vocabulary-know-meet-meet-with-or-meet-up/ to practice what you've learned. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about the difference between "know" and "meet". This is a very common mistake I hear many, many students making. Okay. I'm also going to teach you about the difference between "meet", "meet with", or "meet up with". Okay? And this, in case you're wondering, is the past tense of "meet". Okay? So in this video we're going to talk about: "know", "meet", "meet up with", and "meet with", and: What are the differences between those different words? So let's get started. So I have here four sentences. "I knew Chelsea last week." And "knew" is the past of "know". "I met Chelsea last week." "Met" is the past of "meet". "I met with Chelsea last week." and: "I met up with Chelsea last week." Do you know what the difference between these sentences are? Are there any ones that have a mistake in them or all these all good sentences? Okay, so take a moment and think about it. Okay. So, let's first look at the difference between these two: "I knew Chelsea last week." and "I met Chelsea last week." So I have here some pictures. Pictures can really help you remember things, and they can really, you know, help make a point... A stronger point. So, let's get started over here. We have "meet", which is now and the past, which is "met". I have here two people. These people do not know each other. It's the first time that they are talking. Okay? They don't know each other. So what do they say? They say: "Nice to meet you!" We use "meet" when we're meeting somebody for the first time. We use "meet" with strangers. Okay? So these guys, they don't know each other and now they are meeting for the first time. Okay, so these two, we could say: "They met last week." Meaning: The first time they shook hands: "Hi. Nice to meet you." was last week. Now, compare this to "know" or "knew", which again, is the past tense. We have here two friends. Okay? We can call them David and Ken. They're friends forever. Okay? They've been friends for a very long time. In this case they know each other. They have history. It's not they're meeting for the first time. No. They met a long time ago. So if there's history between two people, they know each other. If there is no history between two people and, you know, it's their first time shaking hands, saying: "Nice to meet you", they meet each other. Okay? So this one we would never say... This is a mistake I hear a lot. A lot of people say: "Oh. It's nice to know you." We don't say that. Okay? Because "know" means you met the person a long time ago and you've... You know, you have a history together. For this, this is the first time, we would use "meet" not "know". Okay? So another thing I wanted to say on this is a lot of the times you want to... You know, you want to talk about how long has somebody been friends with somebody or how long has somebody had this person for their teacher. So the... What we usually use is the present perfect, so we often say how long we've known someone. Okay? So "known" is the past participle of "know". So what you can say if somebody says: -"Oh. How long have you known your husband for?" -"I've known my husband for 10 years." -"How long has Dave known Ken for?" -"Dave has known Ken for five years." Okay? So, again, this is asking about: How long is your history? How long have you known each other for? Again, this is key English. It comes up a lot in conversation. When you meet somebody, you know, and there's like a couple, you often say: "Oh. How long have you known Bob for? How long have you known Jennifer for?" Okay? So now let's look at some of the differences with "met", or, sorry. "Meet", "meet with", and "meet up with". Okay, so quick question to you. We've just gone over the difference between "know" and "met". For these two: "I knew Chelsea last week.", "I met Chelsea last week." which one do you think is correct? Well, if you said number two: "I met Chelsea last week." that's right. Oh, okay. "I met Chelsea last week." This one is correct, because usually you know somebody for a long time and we usually don't use "knew" because it makes it sound like the person has died or that you don't know them anymore. So we usually use "know" or we use "have known".
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Real English: Talking about pets and animals Real English: Talking about pets and animals
2 years ago En
Do you like animals? Do you have a pet? Join me and Gizmo and learn to speak about your favorite animals! Asking about pets can be a great conversation starter. So in this lesson, we will answer your most common questions about pets. What do North Americans think of their dogs? What questions can you ask people about their pets? Do we call pets "he", "she", or "it"? What sounds do dogs make? What do we call dog and cat hair? Learn the answers to these questions and many more. Take our quiz to practice what you learned in this useful lesson that will teach you not just English vocabulary, but an important aspect of North American culture! http://www.engvid.com/real-english-talking-about-pets-and-animals/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and this is my friend Gizmo, and today we are going to help you learn English. Today's English is all about dogs. Okay? So, let's ask some questions to Gizmo, and we can get some answers. Our first question: Do we call pets "he", "she", or "it"? What do you think, Gizmo? Usually for pets we like to use "he" or "she". Okay? So you might ask somebody: "What's her name?" or "What's his name?" when you're talking about a dog or a cat. We usually use "it" for wild animals, although sometimes we also use "he" and "she" if we want to personify them. So, majority of the time we use "he" or "she" when we're talking about pets. Okay, question number two: What is pet hair called? Do you know the answer to this one, Gizmo? It is called fur. Okay? F-u-r, fur. As you can see, Gizmo has a lot of fur. We use the word "fur" when we're talking about cat hair, dog hair, hamster hair. It's what we call fur. Okay, our next question: What are pet hands called? Okay, let's show Gizmo's off. So Gizmo, what is this called? This is a paw. So, dogs and cats have paws. I'm just going to put Gizmo down for a second. There you go. Okay, so his hands are called paws. Okay, our next question: What does "canine" mean? "Canine" is another way to say "dog", but "canine" is more scientific sounding. So if you're reading a science book or something that's formal writing, you will probably see the word "canine". It's the science... Scientific word for dog. We also have the word "puppy". What does the word "puppy" mean? "Puppy" means a baby dog. Okay? So, when a dog is very small and very young, usually around, you know, two months to one year, we call it a puppy. For kittens, that's what we call a baby cat, a kitten. Okay, our next question is a very good one: What sound does a dog make? Sounds are very cultural. In different cultures, animals make different sounds. For dogs, in English, dogs can either bark, they can say: "Woof woof", or they can say: "Ruff ruff". Is this different than what dogs say in your language? If you're wondering with cats or with, you know, all sorts of other animals, you can actually check out Ronnie's video which covers a lot of these different animal sounds if you're interested. Okay, finally, our last question for vocabulary: What do you call a dog with no home? So a dog that lives in the streets. We call a dog with no home a stray dog, or we can also say a street dog. So we would say: "That dog has no owner. He's without a family. He's a stray dog." Or: "He is a street dog." So now let's look at some grammar and pronunciation, and cultural tips about talking about dogs. Okay, so our next question is a grammar question, and it's a very important grammar question. Okay, so let me hold Gizmo. Okay. So, Gizmo, you see these two things? "I like dog", "I like dogs". Do you know what the difference between these two sentences are? No? Okay, well, let me tell you. "I like dog" is very different than: "I like dogs". When you want to say you like dogs as in, you know, you think they're really cute and funny, and you enjoy them, you say: "I like dogs" with an "s". This is different from: "I like dog" with no "s". If you say: "I like dog" it makes it sound like you like to eat dog. Okay? And this is true for a lot of animals. If we say: "I like chicken", it means I like to eat chicken. This is very different from: "I like chickens", which means: "I think chickens are cute. I enjoy chickens, and I find them very interesting." Okay, so the next question is a pronunciation question, and that is: What is the pronunciation difference between "dogs" and "ducks"? So a duck is an animal, you know, that says: "Quack quack", at least in English it does, and a lot of students, when they say these words they pronounce them the same way.
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How to learn English if you are shy How to learn English if you are shy
2 years ago En
Are you shy? Do you feel uncomfortable or embarrassed when speaking English? Are you envious when your classmates, coworkers, or friends seem so comfortable speaking English to each other or in front of groups? In this video, I will give you advice to overcome your shyness. If you are shy, don't be discouraged, because you can learn English just as well as talkative, social people, but you need to use different strategies. Today, I will share my tips and tricks with you to help you break out of your shell! Did you understand the video? Take the quiz to find out: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-learn-english-if-you-are-shy/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to help you become a better speaker, especially if you are shy. Okay? So, a lot of people when they learn new languages, they're very embarrassed and they're too shy to speak. This video will help you with good tips and strategies on how to become more confident in your speaking. So let's get started. Okay, so the first thing I like to tell shy people, so people who are afraid to speak, is: You need to find your strengths. You need to ask yourself: "What am I good at?" Because a lot of the times, shy people, they think: "Oh my goodness, I'm not good at speaking, I'm terrible at English, I'll never learn this language", and they feel really sad. But that's not usually true. Usually shy people are good at many different things, they just don't realize it. So remember: English is not only speaking. Speaking is part of it, but there are other skills, too. Maybe you're a great listener. Okay? Maybe you're good at grammar. Maybe you're not good at all grammar, but you're amazing at the present perfect or the simple past. You know, maybe you're good at reading or writing. So it's good to recognize what you're good at so you don't feel so sad when you're learning English, because you might be good at a lot of different things. So, you can always write down on a piece of paper: "I am able to", you know, listen very well, or: "I am able to do well on my grammar test." Okay? So think about: What are your strengths? My next tip is probably one of the most important tips. When you're trying to learn a language, especially when you're shy, it's good to make goals and to write them down. Okay? So what do I mean by goals? Well, for example, I have three goals here and I'm going to talk about each of them. Somebody's goal might be: "I will be a better speaker." Or they might say: "I will say two things in class today." Or: "I will ask two people: 'How is your day going?'" So these are all goals, but these goals are not all great goals. What do I mean by that? Well, this first goal: "I will be a better speaker", you will not know if you've become a better speaker or not. This goal, it's too big so I would not use this goal. Okay? When you make a goal it's good to make something where you have a number in it, and you can tell very easily: Did you do it or didn't you do it? So, for example: "I will say two things in class today", this is a great goal because you know: "Okay, I said two things in class, I met my goal for the day." This will really help you with speaking, especially if you're shy. Maybe you're too shy even to say two things in class, so maybe you can say one thing in class or maybe for the first class you can just listen and try for the next class to say one thing. Okay? Another example of a great goal is: "I will ask two", and again, this can be any number. "I will ask two people: 'How is your day going today?'" So just by making goals, it can really encourage you to speak and practice your English, and you will improve this way because it is important to speak as much as you can. This way, you know, it's not too difficult, it's something you can do. The other key point here is: Write down your goals. I think it's great to have a journal or a diary where you write down your daily goal, and then at the end of the week you can check it off and see: Did I meet this goal? Hopefully you did, and that way you can actually monitor your English progress. So now let's look at some more tips. Okay, so my next tip is very important, too: Don't compare yourself to extroverts. So, what is an extrovert? It's the opposite of a shy person. So, an extrovert is somebody who everybody pays attention to because they love to talk, they're great in social situations, they're usually with friends or out with people. So, an extrovert is somebody who's not really shy. So, what a lot of shy people do is they compare themselves. They see the extrovert, and they think: "Wow, I wish I was just like that person. That person's speaking is so good. Why can't I speak like that?" It's very common to compare yourself, but it's not a good idea, because number one, it's possible that person is making a lot of mistakes.
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Emma's TOP 15 STUDY TIPS Emma's TOP 15 STUDY TIPS
2 years ago En
Want to do better on your tests? Improve your grades? If you are a student or have an upcoming exam, this lesson is for YOU. Many students spend hours studying in libraries, but they use bad study techniques and waste a lot of time. In this video, I will give you all my BEST study tips. I've found these over the years as both a student and a teacher. Whether you're prepping for the TOEFL or IELTS, taking university or high school classes, or want to improve your memory, this video will help. Take the quiz! http://www.engvid.com/emmas-top-15-study-tips/ Check out the related videos on Power Poses (https://youtu.be/-iRBcNs9oI8) and Mind Maps (https://youtu.be/P1GAGSdAvxM) For more study free advice about studying for exams, go to http://www.goodluckexams.com TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma and in today's video I am going to teach you my top study tips. So if you are having a test coming up or an exam, this might be a high school test or it might be the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP-there's so many different tests-maybe it's a university exam, whatever the case - if you have a test coming up, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a lot of well-researched tips that can really help you improve your marks and to feel more confident the day you're actually taking the test. Okay, so let's get started at some study tips. My first question to you is I want you to think about it. You have a test coming up, where do you study? Some people study in their bed, some might study in the library, maybe a coffee shop, a classroom, or your home. In your opinion, what is the best way to study? Okay, well, if you said your bed, for most people this is a very bad idea. The reason why is if you're studying in your bed with all your books and your notes, your brain, when you're in bed you start thinking about sleep. So if you're studying in your bed, you might become very sleepy and it might be harder to study. So, in... I would not recommend this. Okay? I don't think the bed is a good place to study. What about a library? Some people like studying in libraries, and sometimes it's a good idea. But if you're doing an English test, like where you have a speaking component, a library may or may not be a good place for you. What you really want to do is think about: Where are you taking this test? If you're going to be in a room with many people who maybe are talking or are being loud, you want to study in a similar environment. Okay? So, for some people the library, you know, might be a good place. For other people, maybe the library is not the best place. My point is: You want to study in a place that is just like the environment you'll be taking the test in. So, this is a possibility. Other people might study in coffee shops. Now, if you're doing the IELTS or the TOEFL, this is not a bad idea because at least you're surrounded by people, you're surrounded by distractions, and on your test day you probably will have some sort of distractions around you, especially if people are doing speaking tests where they're talking and you can hear them. So, being around people, if you're doing a test where people will be kind of loud and distracting, a coffee shop is a good idea. But if, you know, there's no speaking component to your test, maybe you're just writing an essay or something like that, then maybe a classroom might actually be a better place. If you're in school and you can go to a place that looks like where you're taking the test, this is the best thing you can do. For home, I personally don't think home is the greatest place to study and I'll tell you why. At home you have your furniture, you have your bed, you have all these distractions around you, so it's easy to stop paying attention to what you're studying, and also your house is not like the environment you'll be taking the test in. You want an environment as similar as possible to where you're actually taking the test, so I would not recommend studying at home. One thing, though, is sometimes it's good to study in multiple locations because the more places you study, the more memories you'll actually have of what you're studying, you'll remember: "Okay, I remember studying this at this coffee shop. I remember studying this at this library, and this at this classroom." So that can actually help... You know, the more places you study, the more memories you will have. Okay, another important thing to note is: Think about your personality. Are you an introvert? This means: Are you a quiet person who kind of prefers to be alone most of the time, where you don't really like big groups? Or maybe you're an extrovert. Okay? So this is where you love big groups, you're, you know, the life of the party, you like being around people. Do you like being alone or with people? Because depending on your answer to that, it can really affect your studying.
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Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 FRONT VOWELS Sound more natural in English: Learn and practice 5 FRONT VOWELS
2 years ago En
Do you want to improve your pronunciation? Do you want to sound more like a native speaker? You need to work on your vowels! In this video, I will teach you how to pronounce five vowels that are common in both British English and American English. These vowels are known as front vowels. I'll help you pronounce these vowels correctly by showing you what your mouth and lips should look like during pronunciation. We will practice the vowels together and compare them to each other. Watch my mouth as I pronounce different vowel sounds and make sure you're doing the same with yours. Many English learners have a hard time with pronunciation because English is not a phonetic language. So I will show you the different spellings of these sounds in English. You will also learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols for these vowels. QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/english-pronunciation-5-front-vowels/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about pronunciation, specifically how to pronounce front vowels. Okay? So, you might be wondering: "What is a vowel?" first question, and: "What is a front vowel?" So these are very good questions. So let me show you first what a vowel is. So we have here: "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and "y". In English, these are our vowels. Okay? So, they're different from consonants. What a consonant is is a consonant is a sound such as: "t", "d", "r", "s". So, these are vowels in green, and what you see in purple, there's a lot more of them, they're consonants. So anything that is not one of these is called a consonant. Okay, so first thing I want to look at is: Where are the vowels in these words, and which are the consonants? We have the word: "king", so where is the vowel here? If we look up here at our list, we have "i" here, "i" here. So this is the vowel, whereas "k", "n", and "g" are consonants. If we look at our next word: "cake", what is the vowel in this word? If you said the "a", you're correct. "Cake". Now, the "e" in "cake" we don't pronounce, so it's not a vowel because we don't actually pronounce the sound. We have here the word: "sheet". What's the vowel in "sheet"? You said an "e", you're correct. Okay? Whereas "s", "h", and "t" are all consonant sounds. Okay, we also have the word here: "ship". Here is the vowel, the "i". And again, "s", "h", and "p" are consonants. What about "happy"? What's the vowel in "happy"? If you said the "a" and the "y", you're correct. These are the vowels. Okay? Whereas "h", "p", and "p" are consonants. So in English, we have: "a", "e", "i", "o", "u", and "y" are the way we spell vowels. But here's the problem or here's the thing that's really difficult for a lot of people: If you look at these two words, we have "a" here and "a" here, both vowels. These a's, even though they're spelt the same way, they have the same spelling, we pronounce them differently. Okay? So for example, this, I would say: "Mat", "mat", just like the word "at", "mat". Whereas this word is actually: "Mate", "mate". So, "mat" and "mate". So they have different sounds even though they have the same "a" in the spelling. So what does this mean? This means that for each of these symbols they have multiple sounds. There are different vowel sounds for each of these. Okay? So, this, for example, is an "a", it can be pronounced: "awh", it can be pronounced: "ah". There's different pronunciations for it. So, in today's lesson I'm going to explain some of these different pronunciations. Okay? So before we begin, I want to talk about how to pronounce vowels. Okay? What you should be really thinking about when you're pronouncing these sounds. The first thing you really should be thinking about is what your lips are doing. Okay? So these are your lips. So when you make a sound, you need to think: Are your lips spread like this, are they very...? Like, for example: "e", you see it's very big and spread, or is it like this, round, like a circle? "O". Okay? "E", "o". Do you see the difference in what my lips are doing? So that's one thing to really think about when you're pronouncing vowels. You also need to think about how big your mouth is. Is it very small, the hole in your mouth? For example: "Oo", there's not a big hole, there's a small hole. Or is it really big, like: "Ah"? Okay? So think about: How big is the opening of your mouth? Is it big or small? Okay, this... I don't know if you can tell what this is... These are your lips, your teeth, and your tongue. You need to know what your tongue is doing in order to pronounce vowels correctly. So is your tongue at the very front of your mouth, close to your teeth? Like, for example, in an "e" sound? Or is your tongue far away from your teeth, is it more towards the back of your mouth? In today's lesson we are only going to be looking at front vowels, vowels which are close to the front... Where your tongue is close to the front of your mouth.
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IELTS Writing Task 1: How to describe a process IELTS Writing Task 1: How to describe a process
2 years ago En
Are you worried about the writing section of the IELTS? In this video, you will learn how to describe a process. You will often need to do this in writing task 1 on the IELTS. It is a good idea to prepare yourself for it. I will teach you what to expect in writing task 1, what a process is, how to understand what is happening in a process, and how to organize your writing by using sequencers. I will also teach you how to use the passive voice, which is very important for this question type and for your English in general. Good luck! Find more IELTS tips at http://www.goodluckielts.com/ Take a quiz on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/ielts-writing-task-1-how-to-describe-a-process/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about how to write about processes. So, if you are taking the IELTS, this video is very important for writing task 1. If you're not taking the IELTS, you can learn a lot in this video, because we will be covering some very important grammar and some very important vocabulary that you can use in your everyday life also. Okay? So, if you're taking the IELTS, this video is great for you; and if you're not taking the IELTS, this video is also very good for you. Okay, so first of all: What is a process? Okay, well, so, if you are doing the IELTS, there are two different writing components: task 1 and task 2. Sometimes you will get some pictures and you have to write about them on the IELTS. So, these pictures show a process. So, a process is pretty much showing different stages or steps on how something is made, or how something works, or how it's created or produced. Okay? So, the key thing here is that you're looking at different stages on how something is made, created, or produced. Processes can be natural or they can be man-made. So, for natural, if you can imagine in science you might learn about how photosynthesis works with plants. Okay? You might learn about how mushrooms grow. Okay? How animals mate. These are all processes. In terms of man-made, an example of a process would be how concrete is made, or even how chocolate is created and produced. Okay? So, on the IELTS, you might, because there are different versions of the test... You may have to look at some pictures and describe a process, and describe what is happening in this picture. So, I've drawn a very simple process-okay?-and this is the process of taking the IELTS. Okay? So, in my picture, I have a student here, and they're at their computer studying different videos and different things to help them prepare for the IELTS. So, this is my first stage or my first step. The second step in my process is actually taking the IELTS, and the final step is the student looking very happy, saying: "I got a great score." Okay? Because they studied a lot and they practiced a lot. So, on the IELTS, you will not get something like this that's this simple. It'd be great if you did, but usually the processes are more complicated. They're more complex. You might have 10 pictures of something like how to make coffee. But the key here is you will see a bunch of pictures, and you need to figure out where the pictures start and where they finish. What is the final product? Okay? So in this case, the beginning is watching this video, and the end is getting a high score on the IELTS. Okay? In making coffee, maybe the first process is getting the beans. Maybe the last process is actually drinking a cup of coffee. Okay? So it's good when you see a diagram to figure out: Where's the beginning, and where's the end? And also thinking about: Is it natural or a man-made process? Okay, so if you are taking the IELTS and you get a bunch of pictures in the writing section, a couple key things here. You will have to write 150 words where you describe the pictures. Okay? And you have 20 minutes to do this. So, what you pretty much need to do is summarize what is happening in the picture. So, you're just reporting the main features, you're summarizing what you see. You are not giving your opinion. Okay? You do not say what you think about the process. All you need to do on the IELTS is say what you see and describe it. Okay? You're also not adding information. If you know about, for example, how to make a cup of coffee and you have to describe this process, maybe you have a lot of information you know about this. But if you don't see it in the pictures, you don't write about it. Okay? So, in this video, I am going to teach you about sequencers, which can really help your mark; as well as grammar, the passive voice, which is something we use a lot when we are describing processes. So, let's look at those features now. Okay. So, in this video, I'm not going to tell you about how to write your introduction, but I just wanted to be clear: It's very important that you have about maybe two sentences to introduce what the process is.
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Learn English: BY or WITH? Learn English: BY or WITH?
2 years ago En Ru
Do you learn WITH Emma or BY Emma? Both "by" and "with" can explain how we do something. But if you don't know which to use, don't worry... you will by the end of this video! I'll show you the key grammatical differences between these words, as well as what sentence structure to use with each, so that you can use 'by' and 'with' correctly in your spoken and written English. Once you understand the difference, I don't think you'll confuse them ever again! Test yourself at http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-by-or-with/ after the lesson to see if you can get 10/10! TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to answer your questions on: What is the difference between "by" and "with"? Many students make mistakes with "by" and "with", so in today's lesson I'm hoping to help you with this so you won't make so many mistakes and you'll understand: What are the differences between these two words? Okay, so to start with I have here some questions. I want you to think: Which ones are correct and which ones are not correct? I also want you to think which sentences... Why are they correct? Okay? So, why are they correct and why are they incorrect? So my first sentence: "I learn English by watching engVid." Compare this to: "I learn English with watching engVid." Which one do you think is the correct form? Do we use "by" or do we use "with"? Okay. If you said: "I learn English by watching engVid." you are correct. Okay? And I will explain why in the next part of this video. So: "I learn English with watching engVid." no, we don't use that. Okay, so what about the next two? "I write with a pen.", "I write by a pen." Which one do you think is the correct sentence, and which one is incorrect and why? Okay, if you said: "I write with a pen." you are correct. In this case this is the correct one. And: "I write by a pen." this is-enh-incorrect. So, before we talk about some of the differences, let's talk about the similarities. How are "by" and "with" the same? Well, they both answer the question: How? Okay? So they're both the answer to the question: How? How do you learn English? I learn English by watching engVid. I learn English by reading my dictionary every night. That's probably not a good idea, but I learn English by talking to people. Okay? So that's answering how you do something. Similarly with "with", it also answers the question: How? How do you write? Well, I write with a pen. How do you eat dinner? I eat dinner with a fork. Okay? Or I eat dinner with chopsticks. So they both answer the same question: How? But they are a little bit different, so let's look at these differences now. Okay, so let's look at some example sentences with "by". "I turn on the computer by pushing the on button." Okay? So this is, again, answering the question: How? How do you turn on the computer? Well, I turn on the computer by pushing the on button. I want you to take a moment to look at this sentence. What comes after "by"? We have here "pushing". "Pushing" is a verb. Okay? So I'm just going to underline this. So we often use... After "by" we often have a verb when we're explaining how something is done. Let's look at another example. "I keep healthy by exercising." So, again, after "by" you'll notice we have a verb: "exercise". Okay? In this case it's "exercising". So, one of the first things to notice is after "by" we often have a verb. I have here: "by verb", but that's not all. If you look at the verb, what form is the verb in? Well, take a moment. What do "pushing" and "exercising" have in common? They both end in "ing", so I'm going to write here: "ing". Okay? So we use "by", after "by" comes a verb, and then comes "ing". You know: How do you keep clean? I keep clean by showering. How do you study? I study by... Well, not hanging out with my friends, that would be terrible for studying. I study by reading over my notes. Okay? So after "by" we have the verb and "ing". So let's do one together. "I learned karate (or karate) by _________ YouTube." What do you think the verb would be? We could say: "by watch". Is that right? "...by watch YouTube"? No, we need the "ing", perfect. "I learned karate by watching YouTube." Okay? So, again, this is very useful because any time you're explaining how, if you have a verb and "by" then you can explain how you do something. Okay, now let's look at some of... Some more differences between "with" and "by". So before I begin teaching you more about "by" and "with", I just want to say that these are the general rules, and there are always times in English when rules are broken or when there are exceptions. Okay? And so these are the most basic of the rules with "by" and "with". Okay, so now let's look at when we're talking about a noun. We've just talked about using "by" with a verb ending in "ing" to answer how to do something. Well, we can also talk about how... When... By using a noun.
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Phrasal Verbs for TRAVEL: "drop off", "get in", "check out"... Phrasal Verbs for TRAVEL: "drop off", "get in", "check out"...
2 years ago En
Want to learn some extremely common verbs for traveling? You've come to the right place. They say traveling is the school of life. It is also a great opportunity to improve your English! In this video, I will teach you common phrasal verbs that we use when talking about traveling. But first, I will explain what phrasal verbs are and show you their importance in conversational English. We will look at how to correctly use "drop off", "see off", "take off", "get in", "check in", and more. Join me, and get ready for a big trip to improve both your life and your English! TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/phrasal-verbs-for-travel-drop-off-get-in-check-out/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to talk about something I love, and that is travel. So, if you like travelling too, if you're planning on going on a vacation, or if you know somebody who's travelling, this video will be very, very helpful to you. In this video I'm going to teach you some very important verbs. They're all phrasal verbs, and I'll explain what a phrasal verb is in a moment. So, these are all verbs that we use when we're talking about travel. Okay. So, to get started, I wanted to tell you a little bit about phrasal verbs. What is a phrasal verb? One of the difficulties students have with English are verbs where you have a verb and a preposition. So, when you see a verb and a preposition together, that's a phrasal verb. Now, you might be thinking: "What's a preposition?" Good question. I'm going to give you an example. We have here four words, each of these is a phrasal verb. They all have the verb "get": "get in", "get up", "get on", "get over", and there's many more, "get away". There's tons of them. Each of these actually can have multiple meanings, too. So, one of the most difficult parts about English is learning phrasal verbs, because this, the blue part is the preposition, it can change the meaning of the verb. Okay? So, prepositions are words like: "on", "off", "up", "down", "toward", "over", "away", these types of words are prepositions. So, you'll notice with phrasal verbs, they're very, very common in conversation. They're... You can write them down, too, but in general, when people talk they often use phrasal verbs. Okay? So, they're very, very important, especially when you're talking about going on a trip with your friends or family. So let's look at some of the common phrasal verbs we use when we're talking about trips. The first verb I want to teach you: "Drop off". Okay? So: "drop" is the verb, "off" is the preposition, together: "drop off" is a phrasal verb. What does this mean: "drop off"? When you "drop someone off" it means you're taking them to a place and then you leave them there. So, for example, maybe your friend needs to go to the airport, so you drive them to the airport and you drop them off at the airport. This means you take them there and you leave them in that place. Okay? So they don't come home with you; they stay there. So, for example, I have a friend named Frank, and when Frank goes travelling: "We drop Frank off at the airport." So, we drive Frank to the airport, he has all his luggage, his suitcases, and then we say to Frank: "Goodbye, Frank, you know, have a nice trip." We drop Frank off at the airport. You can also use "drop off" in a lot of other situations. For example, when you were a child maybe your parents, your mom or your dad, or maybe your grandparents dropped you off at school. This means that they took you to school, and then once you got to school, they would say goodbye to you and they would leave. So: "drop off" means you take someone to a place, and then you leave them there. You'll also notice... So, I have here the verb and the preposition. "Frank" is a name of a person and it's in the middle of "drop" and "off". Okay? So, these two are not together. We drop somebody off at the airport. Okay? So, sometimes with phrasal verbs... For some phrasal verbs you actually separate them, and you can put the names of somebody between them; for other ones you can't do that. For this one: "drop off", you put the name between the two... Between the verb and the preposition. So, now let's look at another example of a common phrasal verb. "See off". Okay? So, again, we have "off" in both of these. "See off" is when... It's similar to "drop off", but it's a little bit different. Sometimes your family or your friends are going away for a long time, maybe they're going on a vacation or a trip, so you want to "see them off". It means you want to say goodbye to them at the airport, at the train station, maybe at their house. So, it's that goodbye you say before somebody goes off on a vacation. Okay? So, for example: "We see Frank off." Frank is going to Australia, so we go to the airport because we want to say goodbye to Frank, so: "We see Frank off" is another way to say: "We say goodbye to Frank when he goes on his trip."
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How to give great customer service: The L.A.S.T. method How to give great customer service: The L.A.S.T. method
2 years ago En
http://www.engvid.com/ Do you work in customer service? What do you do when your customer has a problem? In this video, I will teach you how to give great customer service. You will learn many polite expressions you can use with your customers. I will explain the Listen, Apologize, Solve, and Thank (L.A.S.T) method, which will help your performance at any customer service job. I'll also give you my customer service tips for dealing with an angry customer. After this video, watch Rebecca's video about phone customer service: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBSrZYXkkyE Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-give-great-customer-service-the-last-method/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you a very, very important thing for customer service. I used to work in customer service, and this is actually one of the most important things I learned, and this is called the L-A-S-T or LAST approach. So, to get started, let's talk a little bit about: What is customer service? So, customer service is when you have customers, of course, and you're trying to make your customers as comfortable and happy as possible. You're also trying to meet their needs and expectations, and solve any problems or situations that they might have. So, customer service is a huge category. There's many, many different jobs where you use customer service. If you work in a hotel, for example, as a clerk, you know, in the lobby, as a bellhop, you will be using customer service. If you work at a restaurant as a server, you'll be using customer service, or as a hostess. If you're the manager of a store, you'll be using customer service. If you work in a business or even in a hospital, you'll be using customer service. So, pretty much any time you're dealing with people from the public and they're customers and you're trying to help them, you're doing customer service. So, there are many different problems that a customer might have. What are some examples of some problems? Can you think of anything, a problem a customer might have? Maybe somebody charged them too much for something, maybe they're in a store and the lineups are too long, maybe a customer is at a hotel and they're very unhappy because the Wi-Fi isn't working or their bed's uncomfortable. So, there's so many different problems customers might have at different types of businesses. In this video what I'm going to teach you is: What do you do when a customer has a problem? Okay? So, a very easy thing to do when a customer has a problem is called the LAST approach. "LAST", what does it stand for? Well, if a customer has a problem, the first thing you should do is listen to their problem, the next thing you should do is apologize, solve their problem, and thank them. So: Listen, Apologize, Solve, and Thank. We're going to look at expressions we use to show we're listening, expressions to apologize, expressions that can help us solve problems, and expressions to thank customers. Okay, so the first step when a customer has a problem is to listen. So, the first thing you should do is find out what the problem is. You can ask them: "What seems to be the problem?" or "How can I help you?" Okay? Once they start explaining what the problem is, very important that you look like you're actually listening and that you do listen. Okay? So, you shouldn't look at your watch: "Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm." Okay? That's a bad idea. You shouldn't look at the sky: "Uh, when is this person going to stop talking?" Okay? You shouldn't roll your eyes. Okay? No, no, no. You need to show that you actually care about what the customer is saying. So, showing you're listening is very important. You can repeat back to the customer what they're saying to show that you understand and to make sure that you did understand. So: "So what you're saying is, you know, there's no hot water in this hotel.", "So what you're saying is the Wi-Fi's not working and you're not happy with that." Okay? These are some examples. "So what you're saying is _________." You can also say: "Let me get this right..." "Let me get this right, what you're saying is that, you know, there's a problem at your table.", "What you're saying is that you've been waiting for your food for a really long time." So it's important to show that you are listening and you acknowledge what they have said. Okay. Now, sometimes with customer service you get a customer who's very angry, and maybe they start swearing, they start using very bad language. Okay? So if this happens, very important that you don't get upset. Okay? When this happened to me in the past, I would actually pretend to be a computer. I would not take anything personally. I would just smile and pretend to be a computer, and that's how I got through angry customers. So, if the person is rude... You know, it's not right if somebody is saying something rude to you, if they're swearing at you, or they're making you feel uncomfortable. So, be polite. Okay?
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How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question
3 years ago En
Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.
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How to study efficiently: The Cornell Notes Method How to study efficiently: The Cornell Notes Method
3 years ago En
Learn to study faster and more efficiently, and remember more! I will show you my favorite system for taking notes, called the Cornell Notetaking System. You'll learn a way to take better notes and become a better active listener. I'll explain how to use this method and show you an example of it. Using the Cornell template will help you remember more of what you hear in class and help you organize your notes better. This method will help you if you are a student in a high school, language school, or university, or if you attend meetings, conferences, or like studying on your own! You can practice using the Cornell Notetaking Method with this video on the differences between British and American spelling at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BG017jvhB7I , or any other engVid lesson! To test how well you understood this lesson, take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-study-efficiently-the-cornell-notes-method/ Find more free advice on how to take good notes here: http://www.goodluckexams.com/how-to-take-effective-study-notes/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you an amazing way to listen and take notes. This method I am going to teach you today is really, really going to help you, and I know this because I use this method myself, and I found it has really, really helped me when I was in university, during meetings, during all sorts of different situations. This method really works. So, first, before I teach you about the method, I want you to think about yourself and I want you to think about: When do you take notes? Okay? So, when do you listen and when do you take notes? So, some of you might think... Maybe you're in university, maybe you're in college, maybe you're in high school, and you have to listen to your teacher talk, and you have to take notes to help you remember what they are saying. Maybe you've graduated and you're working in a business, and you have meetings and... Or presentations, and you also need to take notes. So, this method will work for whether you're working or you're studying. Maybe you're taking the IELTS or the TOEFL, this can also help you on the TOEFL test in terms of improving your listening and taking notes. So, how do you take notes? Okay? I know some students, they watch their professor or their teacher talk, and they use their computer, and they just type everything their professor or teacher says. Is this something you do? Maybe you write your notes, and you write every single thing your professor says down on a piece of paper, or anything somebody says. Well, there are a couple of problems with these methods, and I'm going to explain to you some of the problems now. So, for people who like to take notes by computer, there are some advantages of this. You're able to type really quickly and you're able to get a lot of what you hear down on your computer, and it's easy to save. But the problem with this is it's a type of passive listening. So, a lot of the times you're not actually using your brain to interpret what you're listening to, and you're not actively listening. You're just copying word for word, you're not actually doing anything active with the material you're listening to. So, working with a computer-and I've seen this in my university-a lot of students also end up going on Facebook during the lesson or lecture. So, a lot of the times they get very distracted. When they should be listening, they're actually not. So, for me personally and I think for a lot of people, using a computer to take notes is not the best method. Again, for some people it might work, but for a lot of people it doesn't. A lot of the times it's actually better to take notes by hand, and the reason is when you take notes by hand, you have to think about what you're writing because writing takes a bit longer than typing. So you're organizing the material, therefore it's more of an active way to listen. Okay? And they've done psychology studies on this, and they do find that taking your notes by hand is often better than taking notes by a computer. So, today I am going to teach you a way to take notes by hand using what is called "The Cornell Method". This method was developed at Cornell University, and a lot of universities actually encourage students to use this method because it is very good. So, what is the Cornell Method? Okay, well, I'm glad you asked. So, I have here an example of how you would organize your paper. Imagine this is your paper that you take your notes on. What you can do is you can make a box just like this where you have a box where you write the title and the date of the lesson, you have a square or a rectangle here, you have a rectangle here, and you have a rectangle at the bottom. Okay? So, in total you have-one, two, three, four-four different rectangles.
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Silent Letters: When NOT to pronounce B, D, and L in English Silent Letters: When NOT to pronounce B, D, and L in English
3 years ago En
You know that English has silent letters, but how do you know when certain letters are silent? In this video, you'll learn the rules for when NOT to pronounce the letters B, D, and L in English words. I'll also show you lots of example words that you can practice pronouncing correctly. I've chosen the most common words with these silent letters, so that even if you don't remember the rules, you'll still know how to pronounce these common words correctly. This is also a great chance for you to improve your spelling. After the lesson, take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/silent-letters-when-not-to-pronounce-b-d-and-l-in-english/ You can also watch many other pronunciation lessons on our site! TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about silent sounds. So I'm going to teach you about "b", "d", and "l" in words where we don't pronounce them. So, this is a pronunciation video, as well as a spelling video. Okay? So, if you have trouble with pronunciation and spelling, this video is for you. So, I'm going to first explain... Actually, let's first look at a couple words. I have the word, here: "climb", "Wednesday", and "walk". These words have something that's the same in all of them. Okay? They have multiple things that's the same in all of them, but I want you to listen for the pronunciation. "Climb". Is there something in here we don't pronounce? "Climb". If you said: "'b'. We do not pronounce the 'b'", you are correct. What about "Wednesday"? "Wednesday". Am I pronouncing the "d" in this? "Wednesday". No. I do not pronounce the "d". Okay? And what about "walk"? "Walk". Is there something I'm not pronouncing in this word? "Walk". Do I pronounce every letter? No. "Walk". Okay, so the "l"... If you said: "The 'l'", I'm not pronouncing the "l", you're correct. So, in this video we're going to look at a bunch of words, and we're going to learn some rules with their pronunciation when we don't pronounce these sounds or these letters. Okay? So let's get started with words like "climb", the silent "b". Okay? So, silent "b" means sometimes in a word we do not pronounce a "b". When is this true? Well, the first rule with the silent "b" is we don't pronounce "b" when there's an "m" before it. Okay? So you notice "b"... "mb". If you see an "m" and a "b" right after it, the "b" becomes silent. So, we don't ever say: "Clim-b", no, no, no. We say: "Clime". For spelling, we have the "b", but for pronunciation, we don't. So, let's look at some other words. "Dumb". Okay? Do you hear a "b" sound in there? "Dumb". No. So, again, you'll notice there's an "m" and a "b", we see the "m", so we know no pronunciation of the "b" sound. For those of you who don't know the word "dumb", it means the same thing as stupid. You know, "That man is very dumb", "That man is very stupid", they have the same meaning. Okay, we have another word, here: "comb". Okay? So, "comb" is like you comb your hair in the morning. Do you hear the "b" sound? "Comb". No, there's no "b" sound, because again, we have this "m", so that means no "b" pronunciation. Okay. You see this? This is a "thumb". We have our fingers and our thumb. Now, what do you notice in the spelling of this? You're going to notice a pattern, here. We have "m", so do we pronounce the "b"? No, we do not pronounce the "b". So, we don't say: "Thum-b". No. We say: "Thum". Okay, "bomb". If you think about a bomb, an explosion. Right? "Bomb". Again, same rule, if you have an "m", you do not pronounce the "b". So we don't say: "Bom-b", no. We say: "Bom", and we get rid of this. Okay, the last word we'll look at for "mb" pronunciation: "limb". So, your limbs are your arms and your legs. Okay? So, arms and legs are the same thing as your limbs. Now, do we pronounce the "b", here? If you said: "No", you are correct, because as you can see, there's an "m", so we don't pronounce the "b". Okay, so there's another rule when it comes to "b" pronunciation. Okay. I want you to now look over here. "b" and "t". This word: "debt". Do you hear the "b" in the pronunciation? "Debt". You shouldn't hear the "b". I did not pronounce the "b", because when you have "b" and right after "t", usually you don't pronounce the "b". There are always exceptions to this rule, but in general, if you see "b" and "t", usually you do not pronounce the "b". So, "debt". I've heard many students say: "De-bt", and they get really tongue twisted. We don't... Don't worry about that, because you don't have to pronounce the "b".
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IELTS Writing: Numbers and Pie Charts IELTS Writing: Numbers and Pie Charts
3 years ago En
Taking the IELTS? In this video, I will teach you key vocabulary that will help you get a better score on the writing section of the IELTS. To make things easy for you, I'll teach you impressive academic vocabulary and give you sentences you can use to describe numbers, percentages, and fractions. You'll learn what IELTS examiners are looking for, and what you need to write to get a high band. We'll practice analyzing and describing pie charts so you know exactly what to do when you take your test! Continue your IELTS preparation with many other free IELTS lessons at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaNNx1k0ao1v8I2C8DAxXOayC3dG00xtj Test your understanding of this video with my quiz at http://www.engvid.com/ielts-writing-numbers-and-pie-charts/ More free IELTS tips and training: http://www.goodluckielts.com TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to talk a lot about the IELTS test, specifically writing task one. I'm going to teach you about a certain thing you might see on the IELTS, and that's a pie chart. I'm going to explain what a pie chart is, and ways to talk about pie charts in order to improve your vocabulary mark for the IELTS. Many students get really, really confused when they see graphs on the IELTS, and they get really confused trying to talk about numbers, specifically. So, in this video, I'm also going to talk about: How do we describe numbers when we're looking at pie charts? How do we describe percentages? You know, and how can we make our vocabulary very varied? Okay? So, let's get started. The first thing I want to do is talk about: What is a pie chart? So, I have here three different types of graphs. Three different graphs you might see on the IELTS, in the writing section, in the very first part of the writing section. Okay? You might see a picture like this, like this, or like this. So, one of these looks like a pie, something you eat. Which one do you think looks the most like pie? If you said this one, you are correct. This is what we are going to be talking about today. We can call it either a "pie chart" or a "pie graph". Both are correct. You might also see this one, this one is called a line graph; or you might see this, which is called a bar graph. So, let me write that on the board. So, "pie chart", "line graph", and "bar graph". You might also see a process, a diagram, or maybe even a table on the IELTS. But for today, we are only going to be focusing on pie charts. Okay, so what is a pie chart? A pie chart shows us percentages. Okay? So, if we look down here, I have here what I spend my money on. Okay? I want you to imagine each month, all the money I make, all my salary, this is what I spend it on. I spend some of it on rent, I spend some of it on food, I spend some of it on transport or transportation, and I spend some of it on fun. Okay? So, on the IELTS, you might have to describe something like this. It might be more complicated. Sometimes you might actually have two pie graphs or pie charts that you might have to compare and describe, but in this case, let's start out a little bit easier. So, I want you to imagine you're writing the IELTS, and you've been told to describe this pie chart. What are you going to say about it? Okay? Well, the very first thing you should do is you should think about: What does it all mean? And by that, I mean: Think about how much percent is each thing? Okay? So, for example, for cost of living, how much is this? What size does this look like? Although we can't be sure, because I'm not the best artist and this is not a perfect circle, I would say this is about 50%. Okay? And this, what does it look like to you? Maybe 25%. So, food is around 25%. Transport we might say... Let's say 15%. And fun, maybe 10%. Although, we're not sure. So, on the IELTS you might see something like this. You might actually have the percentages written, so you already know what it is, or you might actually have numbers. Okay? So, this might actually be money, and so it might actually say, like, $500 to rent, $200 to food, and so forth. Okay, but the first thing to do is really think about: What are the percentages, here? Okay, so to begin a sentence when we're talking about the pie chart, these are three different sentences that are very great... Really, really good sentences to use on the IELTS when you're talking about pie graphs. The first one is: "According to the chart", you can also say: "We can see from the chart", or "We can see from the pie chart", "The chart shows that", okay? So these are good ways to open up the sentence, and then to actually talk about what you see here.
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Fix Your English Grammar Mistakes: Talking about People Fix Your English Grammar Mistakes: Talking about People
3 years ago En
Should you say "most of people" or "most people"? "Brazilian people" or "Brazilians"? "Every people" or "everybody"? If you're not 100% sure, this lesson is for you. In this lesson you'll learn how to talk about people correctly in English. This is an important subject because, in conversation, we often talk about things people do. I'll teach you the grammar behind common sentences and statements. You'll learn to use these sentence structures correctly and to avoid mistakes that many English learners make. Then take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/fix-your-english-grammar-mistakes-talking-about-people/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about some mistakes a lot of students make. So, I've been teaching English for about five years now, and the mistakes I'm going to teach you today, I've seen students make many times in both their speaking, as well as their writing. Okay? So these mistakes are mistakes students make when they're talking about people. So, I'm going to give you some examples of some of these mistakes. The first one I want to show you: "Some Canadian people hate winter." It's true, I'm one of those people; I hate winter. So, "Some Canadian people hate winter." There's a mistake, here. I want you to take a moment to look, and think: What could the mistake be? "Some Canadian people hate winter." I'll give you a hint: The mistake is somewhere here. If you thought "people" is the mistake, you're correct. "Canadian people", it's redundant. We don't need the word "people", because "Canadian"... If we add an "s" here, this means "Canadian people". Okay? So, instead of saying "Canadian people", we would say "Canadians". "Some Canadians hate winter." It's the same if we wanted to talk about Americans. We would not say: "Some American people hate winter." We would prefer to say: "Some Americans"-with an "s"-"hate winter". So, let's look at another example. "Many Brazilian people are learning English." So, there's a mistake, here. What's the mistake? "Many Brazilian people are learning English." If you said the mistake was "people", you're correct. When we're talking about nationalities, we do not use the word "people". So, what can we do to fix this? We can get rid of the word "people", and what can we do to the word "Brazilian", because there's more than one? We can add an "s". So, now it's: "Many Brazilians are learning English." Okay? So, I'm going to give you another example, this time not on the board, but I'm just going to say it. "Many Asian people like spicy food.", "Many Asian people like spicy food." Now, how would you fix this sentence? If you said: "Many Asians like spicy food." you'd be correct. So, when we talk about nationalities, we do not need this word; this word is a waste of space. We just need the nationality with an "s". So, I have another common mistake students make over here: "Muslim people". So, Muslim is a religion. Okay? "Muslim people fast"-"fast" means they don't eat-"during Ramadan". "Muslim people fast during Ramadan." It means Muslim people do not eat during their holy month, their religious month of Ramadan. So, there's a mistake, here. What do you think the mistake is? If you said, just like this, "people" is the mistake - you're correct. When we talk about religion and we're talking about Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus - you don't need the word "people". We could just change this to: "Muslims". So, "Muslim" here means a whole... All Muslims, it's like Muslim people, but we don't need the word "people". Here's another example: "Christian people celebrate Easter.", "Christian people celebrate Easter." How can we fix this sentence? We can get rid of the word "people", and just add an "s". We can do the same thing for Hindus. "Hindus are often vegetarian", we could say. "Many Jews live in Israel.", "Many Buddhists live in Asia." Okay? So, instead of saying: "Jewish people", "Hindu people", it's easier just to say "Hindu" with an "s" or "Jews" with an "s". All right, so let's look at some other common mistakes students make. Okay, so another mistake I often see students make in their writing especially, and also sometimes in their speaking is with "most", "some", and "a lot" when they're using these words with "people". Okay? So, the first example: "Most of people have cell phones these days." I see students use: "Most of people" a lot in their essays. So, what's the mistake, here? I'll give you a minute to think about it. "Most of people". The problem here is "of". Okay? We don't need "of"; "of" is incorrect here. We would just say: "Most people". "Most people have cell phones these days." Okay? "Most people love Chinese food.", "Most people like to play sports." You don't need "of". If you had: "Most of the people", that would be okay, but you need "the" here, although that's not as common.
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How to Ask Questions: HOW LONG, HOW MUCH... How to Ask Questions: HOW LONG, HOW MUCH...
3 years ago En Ru
What is the difference between "how much time" and "how many times"? Do we say "how long" or "how long time"? In this essential English lesson, I will teach you how we use "how much time", "how long", and "how many times". I will also look at some of the most common mistakes students make with these question words and teach you how to correct them. At the end of this video, you will know exactly how to form questions using "how". After watching, take my quiz at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-ask-questions-how-long-how-much/ to make sure you understand. TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you a very, very important grammar point. I'm going to teach you about a mistake many, many students make. So I don't want you to make this mistake, so let's get started. In this video I am going to teach you the difference between "How long", "How long time", "How much time" and "How many times". Students often confuse these four expressions. So let's look at some of the differences. So I have here a question. I actually have three different sentences, here. One of them is right, two of them are wrong. Okay? So let's look at these together. The first one: "How long time have you been here?" The second one: "How long have you been here?" And the third one: "How many time have you been here?" So one of these is correct. Which one do you think is right? If you said: "How long time have you been here?" that's incorrect. This one, it's wrong. Number two: "How long have you been here?" If you said this one, you are correct. This is right. What about the last one? "How many time have you been here?" This one is also wrong, but we can make it right if we add an "s". So let's go over each of these so you can find out why some of these are wrong, and why some of them are right. To get started, let's look at "How long". So when we ask somebody: "How long...?" we are asking them about time. Okay? We want to know the amount of time for something. So, for example: "How long have you been here?" I want to know, maybe, how many minutes. Or maybe I want to know how many hours you've been here. Okay? If I ask you: "How long have you lived in England?" an answer would be a number that has to do with time. You might say: "Five years.", "Four weeks.", "Two months." Okay? So when we ask: "How long...?" the answer and what we want to know is about time; minutes, hours, days, months, weeks, years. Okay? So let's look at another example. "How long have you lived in Spain?" The answer is going to be something about time. "Three years." Okay? You'll notice not always, but many times we use: "How long" with the present perfect. It's possible to use it with the past tense, the simple past, and also the future, but you will often see it with the present perfect. "How long have you been married?", "How long have you worked here?", "How long have you studied English?" Okay? So a lot of the questions you probably want to ask somebody, you're probably going to use: "How long have you...?" Okay? Very common way we ask questions. So, what about: "How long time"? Can I say that also? Can I say: "How long time have you lived in Spain?" or: "How long time did you sleep on the plane?" No. If you're asking how long, you don't need the word "time". Okay? We never say in English: "How long time". Many students say: "How long time", but this is not correct. The correct expression: "How long". Not: "How long time". All right, so now let's look at "How much time" and "How many times". Okay, so we've talked about "How long", which is good, "How long time", which is bad. Now let's look at: "How much time...?" I think this is why many students get confused. I think they confuse: "How long" and "How much time", and they... As a result, they create: "How long time", which is incorrect. So: "How much time" actually is pretty much the same as "How long". When you ask: "How much time...?" you want to know about the amount of time. You want to know about maybe it's minutes, days, weeks, months, years. It's the same as "How long". Okay? So, for example: "How much time does it take to get to work?" I could also say: "How long does it take to get to work?" They have the same meaning. Or: "How much time have you waited?", "How much time have you been in line for?" Okay? So, the answers to these questions are going to be about time. -"How much time does it take to get to work?" -"For me, it takes one hour." -"How much time have you waited in line?" -"I've waited in line five minutes." Okay? So, for both "How long" and "How much time", they're pretty much the same. In conversation, we usually use "How long". Okay? You can use both, but native speakers are more likely to use "How long". So if you're trying to decide: Do I use "How much time" or "How long"? "How long" is more natural and it's more common. Okay? But they mean the same thing.
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LISTENING & UNDERSTANDING in 3 Easy Steps LISTENING & UNDERSTANDING in 3 Easy Steps
3 years ago En
"Help! I don't understand." Many English language students have problems listening and feel embarrassed. Do you find yourself struggling to understand native English speakers? Do they sometimes speak too fast or use words you do not know? Do phone conversations make you nervous? You are not alone! You can say goodbye to embarassement because in this lesson, I will teach you THREE STEPS you can follow to help you become a better listener and develop confidence when listening to others. I will also teach you some helpful expressions to use in these situations. Watch the video, and you will start having better English conversations immediately! Test your understanding with the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/listening-understanding-in-3-easy-steps/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you how to be a better listener. I'm going to teach you three steps, which will really, really help you with your listening. So before I teach you how to be a better listener, I want you to think about: What kind of listener are you? Okay? So, I have, here, a question. I want you to imagine this. You're talking to somebody, an English speaker, and you don't understand what they're saying. Okay? You have no idea. I don't understand what they're saying. What do you do? Okay? Here are your choices. Do you: A) look scared? A lot of students do this. Do you: B) Nod and pretend you understand? Nod and say: "I understand", but you really don't understand; you have no idea? C) Are you honest? Do you say: "I'm sorry. I don't understand"? Or, D) Do you say: "I don't understand", and you ask the person to write down what they're saying? Okay? So, which one do you do? Do you look scared, do you nod and pretend you understand when you don't? Do you say: "I don't understand" or do you say: "I don't understand" and ask them to write it down? Maybe you do multiple things. Okay? Which one do you think is the best thing to do? If you said: D or C, you are correct. Okay? Now, there is a little bit of a difference between C and D. It's mainly that D, we use some sort of listening strategy. I'm going to teach you some very, very good strategies you can use, which will help you be a better listener. Okay, so if you don't understand something, very first thing you should do is show you don't understand. Okay? You should really let the person know you don't understand. There's nothing to be embarrassed about. We all have times where we don't understand what somebody is saying, but we really do want to know, so it's very important you let the person know that you don't understand. So, here are a couple of different ways we can say that. The first one: "I didn't catch that.", "I'm sorry, I didn't catch that." This means the exact same thing as: "I don't understand." So you can say: "I don't understand." or "I didn't catch that." You can also say: "I'm sorry I don't understand." One thing a lot of students say, but it's not a good thing to say: "I no understand." Okay? This: "I no understand", I hear many students say it. This, wrong. Okay? So you can either say: "I didn't catch that.", "I'm sorry I don't understand.", but you cannot say: "I no understand." That one is bad English. Okay, so that's the first step. The second step is using a strategy. Okay? So what do I mean by this? When you use a strategy, you're pretty much asking somebody to help you out in a different way. You're asking somebody to do something to help you understand. So, this is an excellent expression, very polite. All of these start with: "Could you please". You can ask the person: "Could you please write it down?" Okay? So: "I'm sorry I didn't catch that. Could you please write it down?" Some... For some people, when they read it, it's easier than listening to it. You can also ask somebody to repeat what they're saying. "Could you please repeat that?" Okay? That means: "Could you please say it again?" A lot of English speakers and also me, myself included, sometimes we speak too fast. So, it's perfectly okay if you say politely: "Could you please speak more slowly?" Maybe the problem is the person who's speaking is talking way too fast. So just a nice, friendly reminder: "Could you please speak more slowly?" And finally, the fourth strategy: "Could you please say it in a different way?" This one is very useful because sometimes when you say to an English speaker: "I don't understand", they keep saying the same thing the exact same way, and that's not helpful. Sometimes you really need to hear it in different words, so it's also a great idea to ask the person: "Could you please say it in a different way?" Okay? So these are the first two steps. First, show you don't understand; second, use a strategy. Now let's look at the third step.
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English Vocabulary & Expressions with HOUSE and HOME English Vocabulary & Expressions with HOUSE and HOME
3 years ago En
What's the difference between "housework" and "homework"? What does it mean if a person is "homeless"? Do "house" and "home" mean the same thing? In this lesson, I will answer all these questions and more. I will also teach you common expressions that use the words "house" and "home". You will learn the meaning of "hometown", "homesick", "home sweet home", "on the house", "make yourself at home", and many more. After watching, you can do your homework by taking the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-expressions-house-home/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you many, many new expressions. Okay? These words and expressions all have to do with "house" and "home", so they're all expressions that have the word "house" or "home" in them. Okay? So, to get started, I wanted to explain the difference between "house" and "home" before we even look at the other expressions. So, let's get started with that. So, there is a little bit of a difference. A "home" means a house, an apartment, it can mean a condo, it can be any place a person lives. Okay? So, if you ever watched the TV show Sesame Street, there was a character, Oscar the Grouch, his home was in a garbage can. Okay? It's not a house, but it's his home because he lives there. Where a mouse, for example, his home might be in a wall. Okay? Or some people, again, maybe their home is in a tent. So, a home is a place where you live. This is different from a "house". A house is one type of building. Okay? So, a house is not an apartment, it's not a condo. This is a house. This is a house. Okay? So, a house is a very specific type of building. So that's the difference. "Home" is... Refers to anywhere a person lives, but a "house" is a type of building. There might be nobody who lives in the house. Okay? I might have four houses, but I... The one I live in is my home. So that's what the difference is. Okay, so let's look at some of these very common expressions. The first one is the word "hometown". I'm going to give you an example of this sentence: "My hometown is Toronto." Okay? What do you think "hometown" means? I'll give you a hint. I'm from Toronto and I was born in Toronto. So, "hometown" is the place you're from. Okay? So, I have a friend who was born in Paris. My friend's hometown is Paris. Some people come from big hometowns, other people come from small hometowns. Okay? So the hometown is where you were born or where you spent your childhood. Where you were living when you were a child, that's your hometown. The next word: "homesick". And I want you to notice my pronunciation of these words. You'll notice that for "hometown" and "homesick", "home" is the loud part. Okay? I say "home" louder than "town", and "home" louder than "sick", so: "homesick". Here's my example sentence of this word: "I'm homesick. I miss my family." Okay? "I'm homesick. I miss my family." Do you think "homesick" means you're happy or you're sad? If you're homesick, it means you're sad. Why are you sad? Because you're not at home; you're not in your country or your city. You're travelling, you're far from where you live. So, many students from all over the world come to Canada to study English. A lot of students miss their families, they miss their friends, they're a little bit sad because they miss everybody, so we say they are homesick. They miss their country, they are homesick. Okay, again, we have two more words with home: "homeless" and "homelessness". Okay? These words have the same meaning, it's just this is an adjective, and this is a noun. So, I'll give some examples of this. For "homeless": "I sleep on the streets. I'm homeless." Okay? This means I don't have a home. I don't have a place to live. I live on the streets. Okay? So, you know, sometimes when you go to different cities, there are a lot of people on the street, they're asking for money, and they don't have a place to live, we say those people are homeless. When we talk about this problem, we say: "The problem is homelessness." Okay? So that's the noun form. So, there is a lot of homelessness in Toronto. There is a lot of homelessness in many parts of the world. There are many homeless people in Toronto. Okay? So both of these mean you don't have a home, or someone who doesn't have a home.
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English Grammar: How to use "to" before an "-ing" verb English Grammar: How to use "to" before an "-ing" verb
3 years ago En
In this lesson, I explain how and when we use "to" before a verb with the "-ing" ending. The use of "to" before an "-ing" verb is not always correct. But it is correct in a particular case to express an emotion or action happening in the present referring to a past or future event. If this sounds complicated, have no fear! It is a simple structure once you understand how it works. And if you do our quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-how-to-use-to-before-an-ing-verb/ you will get used to using this concept in no time! TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, we are going to talk about something many students wonder about, and that is when we use "to" and "ing" together. Sorry. Okay, so for example... Yeah: "What???" Many students, when they see this, it "poof" their minds; they have no idea: What is this? It goes against all the rules they've learned. So I'm going to explain to you when this happens, and how we can use it. So, let's look at some examples. This is the most common example of this you will see: "I look forward to meeting you." Notice we have our verb: "look forward", and then we have this little guy, here, "to", and then we also have "ing". Okay? So, in this case, it's very strange. We're going to learn about why this is in a moment, but before we do that, I want to tell you some of the basic rules so you can understand, first off: What am I talking about with "ing", and what am I talking about with "to"? So let's look at the basic rules. This is all about when you have two verbs in a sentence. For example: "thank" is the first verb, and "help" is the second verb. Okay? What you will notice in English, the first rule is: Any time you have a preposition between the first verb and the second, you're going to use "ing". A preposition is a word like "for", "to", "about", "toward", "up", "down", "in", "out", all of these words that kind of tell us where something is located, these are called "prepositions". So, whenever you see a preposition after a verb, this next verb is going to end in "ing". So our example here: "I thank you for helping me." Similarly, we have our verb: "interested", "I'm interested", so this is the verb. And we have a second verb: "learn". So, if we have a preposition after the first verb: "I'm interested in", you're going to see that the second verb is going to end in "ing". "I'm interested in learning English." So we don't say: "I'm interested in to learn English." Similarly, we don't say: "I thank you to help me." If you have a preposition like "for", "in", "out", you are going to have the second verb with "ing". Okay, some verbs... These are verbs without prepositions. If we have two verbs and there's no preposition between them, they will be either verb with a second verb ending in "ing", or a verb plus the second verb beginning in "to". So let's look at some examples so you understand what I'm talking about. Okay, I have here the verb "enjoy". Here's my first verb. Think of a second verb we can use. Let's say "eat". With the verb "enjoy", the verb that follows is always going to end in "ing". "I enjoy eating.", "I enjoy reading.", "I enjoy listening to music.", "I enjoy shopping." Okay? So, in this case, all... The second verb will always end in "ing". We have another example, here: "I started". "I started", let's think of a verb, any verb. "Fish". "I started fishing." So, again, this is the first verb, here's the second verb, second verb ends in "ing". I en-... Or: "I started drinking.", "I started eating my dinner." Okay? Then we also have some verbs that you will see... Here's the first verb: "decided". The second verb does not end in "ing". "I decided to", what's a verb we can use here? "Watch". "I decided to watch TV." Okay? "I want to eat ice cream." So, in this case, we have two verbs-so verb one, verb two; verb one, verb two-the second verb begins with the word "to". Now, other teachers on engVid have already covered this information. What you will notice is that some verbs are always like this, some verbs are always like this, and some verbs do both. It's pretty much you have to memorize: When is it "ing"...? Sorry. "ing", and when is it "to"? What we're really interested in today is this, this really confusing thing: Why is it "ing" and "to"? All right? So let's look at some more examples of this, and I will tell you the rule on when we use "ing" and "to" together. Okay, so I've explained to you the three rules we use when we have two verbs together. Okay? Sometimes you have a verb followed by "ing", sometimes you have a verb followed by "to", and in the case of prepositions, you have a verb followed by "ing". So I've taught you these three rules. Now we're going to look at when we have both "ing" and "to" together. Okay? So, "ing" and "to" together. So in this case, we have two verbs. The first verb is: "I look forward to". The second verb is: "meeting". Okay?
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IELTS & TOEFL Vocabulary: Talking about Food IELTS & TOEFL Vocabulary: Talking about Food
3 years ago En
A common speaking topic on both the IELTS and TOEFL is food. In this class, I will teach you some vocabulary and grammar that you can use when talking about food. These expressions can help you score higher on both tests. I will also give you some common examples of speaking questions you may hear. If you are not taking these tests, this lesson will still help you improve your vocabulary and conversational English. Try our quiz at http://www.engvid.com/ielts-toefl-vocabulary-talking-about-food/ to practice these words. Good luck on your test! MORE IELTS TIPS: http://www.goodluckielts.com/ MORE TOEFL TIPS: http://www.goodlucktoefl.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some great expressions and some great things you can say about food. Now, this video will be very, very helpful if you are taking the IELTS, because they often ask you about food in the speaking section, and same with if you're doing the TOEFL, because oftentimes there is a question on food; not always, but often. Also, just this video can benefit everybody, because food is something a lot of people talk about, and so these expressions are very good to use in everyday situations. All right, so let's get started. I have, here, a question. This question comes up a lot on IELTS, sometimes on TOEFL, and in everyday life. The question is: "What kind of food do you like? And what kind of food do you dislike or not like?" So I've written here some key expressions you can use to... Which mean "like" and "dislike". Now, for IELTS and TOEFL people, you really want to show off your vocabulary, so these are some great ways to do that. All right, so let's look at some of these. The first one: "I really like..." This is better than just saying: "I like", because you're actually, you know, giving an amount. "I really like something." So, for me: What kind of food do you like? I like Korean food, so I can say: "I really like bibimbap.", "I enjoy bibimbap.", "My favourite dish is bibimbap." "Dish" is similar to food, but it's not... We wouldn't use it for talking about apples or oranges. We use it for talking about a cooked meal. Okay? So a "dish" means something that is a meal. So: "My favourite dish is spaghetti.", "I'm keen on pizza." And here, be careful with this part: "on". "I'm keen on pizza." Okay, for these two, if you're comparing two foods, you can use these two expressions. So, for example: "I prefer bibimbap to sushi. I prefer lasagna to pizza." So it means I'm saying: "I like pizza better than sushi." Okay? So, key here, preposition "to". "I prefer __________ to __________." Similar-I'll jump on this side-"I'd rather", "I'd rather eat". This means the same thing as "I prefer". The "d" here stands for "would". "I'd rather eat bibimbap than sushi. I'd rather eat Chinese dumplings than McDonalds." Okay? So you can use these expressions, too. Very helpful for TOEFL and IELTS. Okay, what about for dislike, things we don't like? Here are some examples. "I really don't like..." For me: "I really don't like McDonalds. I really don't like hamburgers. I really don't like hotdogs." This has the exact same meaning: "I can't stand hamburgers. I can't stand anchovies.", "I'm not keen on tuna. I'm not keen on oysters." Okay? And finally: "I really dislike... I really dislike sardines." Okay? So these all mean "don't like", and these all mean "like". These are great expressions to use when you're talking about food on the TOEFL or the IELTS, or everyday life. So now let's look at some new vocabulary we can use when describing food. Okay, so another question they might ask you on the IELTS or the TOEFL, or maybe one of your friends might ask you this, is to: "Describe your favourite dish." Okay, I'm just going to say this very quickly: The pronunciation of this word: "favourite", "favourite". Okay? Not "fav-our-ite". And "dish", what's a dish again? A dish is like a meal. Okay? So: "Describe your favourite meal." This is a very common IELTS question and TOEFL. So, when you describe your favourite dish, you might want to talk about how good it is. Okay? "It's incredible, it's amazing." So here are some words we can use that can help you maybe get a higher score on your vocabulary. The first one... And these all mean pretty much "delicious".
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English Conversation: The Meaning of Hand Gestures English Conversation: The Meaning of Hand Gestures
3 years ago En
Have you noticed that you make hand gestures while speaking your native language? Body movement during conversation can give off social clues that are particular to a certain culture. But when people learn a language, they often forget to learn the words and expressions that we make with our hands. You may find that a hand gesture in your culture has a different meaning in English-speaking countries. In this lesson, I will teach you common hand gestures used when speaking English. Take the quiz to test your understanding: http://www.engvid.com/english-conversation-the-meaning-of-hand-gestures/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you all about how we use our hands in English. So there are many ways we use our hands in English. I'm going to teach you a lot of different ways we use them. A lot of students get very confused with this, because the way we use our hands varies from culture to culture, so what we do in Canada and England and the U.S. might be very different than with what you do in your country. Okay? So pay close attention to these differences. So to start with, let's look at: "knock on wood". If you're living in an English-speaking country, you may have noticed sometimes people have a wooden object or a desk, a table, something made of wood, and they knock on it. Okay? You might wonder: "What does this mean, knock on wood?" In English tradition, if you say something good, for example: "I did very, very well on my test. I killed my test. I did amazing on my test", you might knock on wood to make sure that you don't jinx it. Okay? I'll give you another example. Imagine if I want to go on a picnic, and I'm a little afraid about rain, I might say: "Oh, you know, today's supposed to be a very sunny day. Knock on wood." I'm knocking on wood to prevent rain. Okay? So it's a superstition we do in order to kind of protect ourselves from the opposite happening. Okay? One last example: -"How did your interview go? How did your job interview go?" -"Oh, it went well." [Knocks] Okay, so that's why we knock on wood, it's a superstition. All right, let's look at some of these other ones. "Quotes". A lot of students have asked me: "What does this mean?" Okay? So, for example, somebody might say: "Yeah, she's beautiful." Or: "He's really smart." This kind of has a sarcastic tone to it. It means somebody has said somebody is beautiful, but you don't believe it. Or somebody has said somebody is smart, but you don't believe it. So if you hear someone saying something, and you're, you know, pretty much using their words but you don't believe it, you can do quotes. Okay? Another example: "Yeah that movie was awesome." Okay? So it means you don't believe it. English is fun. Your teachers might tell you English is fun. When you're talking to your friends, you might say: "English is fun", if you don't believe it. All right, the next one: "crazy". All right? In English, if we think someone is crazy, we go... Okay? So, for example: "That guy, he's very..." [Clicks tongue] It means he's very crazy. Okay? "Fingers crossed". A lot of the times in English, we take our fingers and we cross them, and we go like this. This means we're hoping something happens. Okay? So, for example: I hope you like this video, fingers crossed. Or: I hope I did well on the test, fingers crossed. Okay? So this means you hope something is happening. Now, this is a little different from if you take your finger and you put it behind your back. If you take your finger... Your fingers crossed and you put it behind your back, it means you're telling a lie. So, for example: "Oh, I loved the movie you made. The movie you made was incredible." If my fingers are behind my back, it means I'm lying to you. "I never talk to that guy." Okay? Fingers behind my back, it means I'm lying. Okay? Now, this one you might know, I think it's a very common one: "OK". It can also mean: "nice work" or "A-OK". So that means something has gone well. We have this one which is a very rude one. This, which means... And sorry, I'm not doing this to you; I'm just teaching it. This means "up yours", which pretty much in English means "fuck you". Okay? So if you ever see somebody going like that, it's not polite. It means up yours or fuck you. Oh, we have one... Two more. "Peace sign". Okay, when we're talking about peace in English, we often go: "Peace." So this is against war. In the 1960s, there were people called Hippies, they were always going: "Peace." This is very different than the V sign, this. Peace is like this, the V sign is like this. The V sign is something that is almost the same as this. In England, in Australia, in New Zealand, if you do this to somebody, you're pretty much telling them: "Fuck you." Okay? So be careful. "Peace", versus "Fuck you."
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The Many Meanings of "LOAD" in English The Many Meanings of "LOAD" in English
3 years ago En
How many meanings does the word "load" have? What about "loaded"? In this video, you'll learn some of the common ways we use these words. We'll cover formal, informal, and slang uses of these words. In English, expressions based on one word can have so many different meanings! For example, did you know that "I'm loaded" can mean "I'm drunk" or "I'm rich"? You'll also see expressions such as "a load off my chest", "a shitload", "free loader", "a load of rubbish", and many more. I will also show you some great strategies to help your learning and understanding of new vocabulary. After you watch the video, review these expressions by taking the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/the-many-meanings-of-load-in-english/ , and practice using them with your friends! TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson I'm going to teach you 10 different expressions with the word "load". Some of these expressions are going to be slang expressions, some of them are going to be verbs, nouns, adjectives; and they all have very, very different meanings. So with the word "load", you might see it a lot. It has a lot of different possible meanings, so you're going to learn 10 today. I'm also going to teach you two different strategies you should use when you see a word you don't know. Okay? So, in this case, we have the word "load" in many different ways. I'm going to teach you two strategies you should use whenever you see a word you don't know or recognize. Okay? So let's talk about the strategies first, and then I'm going to teach you about the different ways we use the word "load". Okay, so when you come across a word you don't know, the first thing you should do is you should try to figure out how much information you can get from it. You can try to figure out if it's a noun, which is a person, a place, or a thing. Is it a verb? Is it an action? Is it an adjective? Which means: Does it describe something? Or is it an adverb? Does it describe a verb? Okay? So it's good to know these words, and to try to figure out if a word is a noun, a verb, an adverb, or an adjective. Okay? Another thing you should do when you come across a new word is you should try to guess what it means based on the words around it. Okay? We call this "context". So, you should look at the sentence, look at the words in the sentence, and look at some of the words in the other sentence, and try to guess what the word means before you look in the dictionary or before you ask your teacher. Remember: The more effort and the more work you do for a word, the more likely you will remember it. Okay? So you want to work hard to remember these words. You want to guess what they mean before you actually find out what they mean. So let's get started with the word "load". Okay, so I have here the first example we're going to do, and that is the word "loaded" with "ed". I have an example sentence. "Bill Gates is loaded. He has so much money." All right? So I want you to take a moment and think: Is this a noun, a verb, an adjective, or an adverb? So here it is in the sentence. This is... What is this? Well, it ends in "ed", okay? So that means it's probably going to either be a verb or an adjective, because both of these often end in "ed". But because it's followed by "is": "Bill Gates is loaded", it sounds like "loaded" is describing Bill Gates. So it's an adjective. Okay? So in this case, "loaded" is an adjective. It's describing Bill Gates. "Bill Gates is loaded." That's a description of Bill Gates. Okay, so we've done the first one. What about the second one? What do you think "loaded" means? Okay? So look at all the words in the sentence. What do you know about Bill Gates? "Bill Gates is loaded. He has so much money." If you focus on "much money" and "Bill Gates", you know Bill Gates is rich; he has a lot of money. "Loaded" means rich. So we can guess that it means rich, based on the words around it. So, I'm going to write that here. The first meaning of the word "loaded" is rich. I have a friend, she's loaded. She lives in a mansion. Okay? Prince William is loaded. You know, he's a prince, he's going to have a lot of money. I wish I was loaded. Unfortunately, I'm not, but it would be so great to be loaded. So, in this case, "loaded" means rich. Okay, so we have the word again, "loaded". This is another different meaning of the word. Okay, so I want you to look at the example. "She's loaded. She had 10 beers." Okay. "She's loaded. She had 10 beers." So first, let's ask ourselves: Is it a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb? Okay? So we look here: "She is loaded." Well, again, it ends in "ed", so this is a clue.
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Describing people in English: BE or BEING? Describing people in English: BE or BEING?
3 years ago En Ru
Do you know the difference between "he is nice" and "he is being nice"? This small change makes a huge difference! In this video, you'll learn how "be" and "being" can either express an overall personality, or a current behavior. The English language is full of small changes which can alter the meaning of a sentence completely. But don't worry! I'll explain how 'be' and 'being' differ from each other, and will teach you to use them correctly. You'll have a chance to see many example sentences, and we'll do some practice exercises together. By the time you finish this easy lesson, I'm sure you'll be able to score 100% on the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/describing-people-in-english-be-or-being/ Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you the difference between "be" and "being" when we are talking about people. Okay? So, I'm going to show you some sentences. The first one: "The boy is naughty." So "naughty" is like a bad boy. And the second one: "The boy is being naughty." What is the difference in this...? These two sentences? What is...? Like, just looking at the grammar, what is something that you notice? Well, you probably notice this is the only thing that's different. "The boy is naughty.", "The boy is being naughty." Okay? Now, one of these has to do with behaviour. The other one has to do with personality. Okay? So, if we look at: "The boy is naughty." what we really are saying is the boy is usually bad. It's a part of his personality. It's his feelings. He's... He's a bad boy, it's who he is. He's a naughty boy. That's a little bit different than: "The boy is being naughty." In this case, we're just looking at a behaviour or an action. The boy is usually a good boy, maybe. Maybe he... You know, he usually does what his parents tell him to, he listens to his teachers, he's a good boy, but that one day he is acting a certain way, his actions are naughty, his behaviour is naughty. The boy is being naughty. So, again, the difference is this is more about the boy... It's his personality type, and this is usually a temporary behaviour. Okay? It's not forever; it's just right now he's acting that way, but it's not who he is. So let's look at some other examples. "You are rude." Okay? Not you personally, but just an example. "You are rude." "Rude", for those of you who don't know, means not polite. So a person who's not polite is a rude person. Okay? If I say: "You are rude." I'm saying it's your personality. You're usually rude. You're a very rude person. It means this is who you are. Now, compare that to: "You are being rude." In this case, you're not usually a rude person; you're quite a polite person, maybe. But in this situation, your behaviour in this moment is rude. Okay? So, again, this is who you are; and this is your behaviour in a specific situation. So I'll give you an example. Okay? You know, I know someone who is always... Well, no, I don't actually know somebody. But imagine if there's somebody who's always picking their nose. We could say: "Ugh, that guy's rude. He's so rude." But if he, I guess does it once... Okay? If it's just a behaviour that happens only one time, you could say: "He's being rude." He's not always rude; it's just this one time. Here's another example: "He is a smartass." Versus: "He is being a smartass." A smartass is a person who tries to be funny, but they do it in kind of a not nice way. So it's almost like not-nice funny. So if you think about when you were a kid, maybe there were some smartasses in your class, those were the kids who always said things that made the teacher very angry. Okay? So those people are smartassess, they purposely try to make people angry. So if you say: "He is a smartass." it just means that's his character. He's usually this way, this is how he is. If you say: "He is being a smartass." it means maybe just this one time. It's his behaviour in this moment, but it's not usual for him. It's just right now. So let's do some work on this together, let's do some examples together. Okay, so now let's do some examples together. The first sentence I have: "I was careful when I drove." So when I drive a car, I'm careful. "I was careful when I drove." And again, "was" is the past tense for "be". Okay, so this is something I usually do, I'm a careful person, I drive very carefully. I want you to imagine this: Imagine if I'm not usually careful, but I see a police officer close to me. Okay? Maybe that might change the way I drive. So now I have a behaviour. How can I make this into a behaviour or an action that's not always true? If you said we can add something, you are right. What are we going to add? We're going to add "being", that "I was being careful when I drove." Let's look at the next one: "Jack is stupid." Jack is a stupid person. I'm sorry if any of you are named Jack, I don't mean you; this is just an example.
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IELTS & TOEFL Listening Practice: Academic Vocabulary IELTS & TOEFL Listening Practice: Academic Vocabulary
3 years ago En
Want to improve your listening skills? In this lesson you'll practice your listening in English by hearing stories about university life. This video is especially important if you are studying in an English university, if you plan to, or if you are going to take an English test like IELTS or TOEFL. You will hear conversational English with university and academic vocabulary, including common slang and expressions that native English speakers use. Then take the quiz here: http://wwww.engvid.com/ielts-toefl-listening-practice-academic-vocabulary/ Follow this link to view or download a free resource page with this lesson's vocabulary: http://www.engvid.com/wp-content/media/Listening-Practice-University-Vocabulary.pdf Also check out these vocabulary lessons to learn the words used in this lesson: Learn English Vocabulary: The people you will meet at UNIVERSITY – http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-people-at-university/ University English: Expressions and Vocabulary – http://www.engvid.com/university-english-expressions-vocabulary/ More IELTS videos: http://www.engvid.com/english-exams/ielts/ More IELTS practice & complete guide: http://www.goodluckielts.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, we are going to do some listening practice. This video is going to be particularly useful if you are going to university or plan to go to university, if you are writing the TOEFL test, or if you are writing the IELTS. University words come up a lot on the TOEFL and the IELTS, especially in the listening, so this video will help you improve your listening, specifically about university words. Okay, so to get started, I want you, on a piece of paper, to put something like this. Okay? I want you to write the word "university" in the center, "verbs", "people", "places", "things", "slang". Okay? I want you to copy this, because I'm going to have you pause the video for one minute... Or maybe... You know what? Give yourself three minutes, and I want you to think about all the words you can think of that have to do with university. Okay? So, for example, people, I might think the "prof"; verbs, I might think "enroll". But try to come up with as many as you can. Places, maybe "cafeteria"; things, "course"; slang, "hit the books". Okay? So I want you to try to come up with as many words as you can, and then we will talk about these words. Okay, so I hope you've done some brainstorming, and you've come up with a list of words. What I want you to do now is I want you to see: Did you come up with any of the same words that I came up with? Okay? So, behind me, I have a bunch of words I thought of. Do you have the same words, or totally different words? I put the word: "advisor", "flunk", "fall behind", "marks", "grades", "freshman", "sophomore", "junior", "senior", "prof", "pull an all-nighter", "cram", "TA", "ace the test", "dean", "instructor", "registrar", "drop a course", "hit the books", "undergrad", "grad student", and "hand in". So these are all very common words we use when we talk about university. If there are any words here that you don't know the meaning of, I highly recommend watching some previous videos I've done on these words that explain them fully. Okay? So there will be a link for that, so feel free, if you don't know these words, to click on the link. So now what I'm going to have you do is we are going to do a practice listening. Okay? We are going to... You are going to listen to me tell you a story about university. You are going to look at these words, and if you hear me say the word, you're going to put a checkmark right beside the words you hear. If you are on engVid, there's going to be a link that you can click to download these words so you can print them off and have them in front of you. Same with on YouTube, if you're watching this off of YouTube, there will be a link you can click on in the description, and that will take you to a place where you can download a list of these words. Otherwise, if you don't want to do that, you can actually just copy them out by hand, just write down these words. And then when you're ready, you can listen to me, and all you need to do is if you hear the word, you put a checkmark. If you don't hear the word in what I'm going to say, then no checkmark. Okay? Okay, so let's get started. So, again, put a checkmark if you hear the word. I went to the University of Toronto. I remember when I was an undergrad, I found school very difficult, especially in my freshman year. I guess the main problem was it was my first time away from home. School had always come naturally to me before. I wasn't used to cramming and pulling all-nighters. I naturally had been a straight-A student.
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