TED-Ed
TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed’s growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com). Want to suggest an idea for a TED-Ed animation or get involved with TED-Ed? Visit our website at: http://ed.ted.com/get_involved. Also, consider donating to us on Patreon! By doing so, you directly support our mission and receive some pretty awesome rewards: https://www.patreon.com/teded For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film, or in an online course), please submit a Media Request using this link: https://media-requests.ted.com/

1579 videos
Are locust plagues unstoppable? - Jeffrey A. Lockwood Are locust plagues unstoppable? - Jeffrey A. Lockwood
2 months ago En
Discover what causes desert locusts to transform into crop-consuming plagues and how they directly endanger humanity. -- A ravenous swarm stretches as far as the eye can see. It has no leader or strategic plan; its only goals are to eat, breed, and move on. These are desert locusts— infamous for their capacity for destruction. But most of the time desert locusts are no more dangerous than grasshoppers. So what does it take to turn these harmless insects into a crop-consuming plague? Jeffrey A. Lockwood investigates. Lesson by Jeffrey A. Lockwood, directed by Franz Palomares. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitte
How to get better at video games, according to babies - Brian Christian How to get better at video games, according to babies - Brian Christian
2 months ago En
Explore what happened when the AI system Deep Q Networks (DQN) attempted to beat the Atari game Montezuma’s Revenge. -- In 2013, a group of researchers wanted to create an AI system that could beat every Atari game. They developed a system called Deep Q Networks (DQN) and less than two years later, it was superhuman. But there was one notable exception. When playing Montezuma’s Revenge, DQN couldn’t score a single point. What was it that made this game so vexingly difficult for AI? Brian Christian investigates. Lesson by Brian Christian, directed by Gavin Edwards, Movult. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter P
The Norse myth that inspired “The Lord of the Rings” - Iseult Gillespie The Norse myth that inspired “The Lord of the Rings” - Iseult Gillespie
2 months ago En
Download a free audiobook version of “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring“ and support TED-Ed's nonprofit mission: https://www.audible.com/ted-ed -- The dwarves were master craftspeople. One dwarf, Andvari, forged marvelous creations. He often took the form of a fish and, one day, he swam to the land of the water nymphs, who guarded mounds of gold. When the nymphs laughed at his appearance, Andvari grew infuriated and seized their gold. With it, he crafted himself a special ring. Iseult Gillespie shares the Norse myth of the cursed ring. Lesson by Iseult Gillespie, directed by BASA. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: htt
The surprisingly long history of electric cars - Daniel Sperling and Gil Tal The surprisingly long history of electric cars - Daniel Sperling and Gil Tal
2 months ago En
Can electric cars reclaim their place on the road? Discover how developments in battery technology are making these cars more efficient and powerful. -- By the end of the 19th century, nearly 40% of American cars were electric. But these vehicles had a few major problems — early car batteries were expensive and inefficient, and the vehicles were twice the price of a gas-powered car. And so for the next several decades, gas-powered cars dominated the market. Can electric cars reclaim their place on the road? Daniel Sperling and Gil Tal investigate. Lesson by Daniel Sperling and Gil Tal, directed by Lobster Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find u
Why is this 2,500 year old shipwreck so well-preserved? - Helen Farr and Jon Adams Why is this 2,500 year old shipwreck so well-preserved? - Helen Farr and Jon Adams
3 months ago En
Discover the unique conditions that make the Black Sea host to dozens of shipwrecks that date back thousands of years. -- In 2017, researchers off the Bulgarian coast discovered the oldest intact shipwreck ever found. This ancient Greek vessel was not only nearly 2,500 years old, but was just one of 65 shipwrecks found at the bottom of the Black Sea in remarkable condition. So, why does the Black Sea contain so many well-preserved shipwrecks? Helen Farr and Jon Adams dive into the depths of the unique body of water. Lesson by Helen Farr and Jon Adams, directed by Yuriy Polyashko, Darvideo Animation Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on T
Can you solve the risky disk riddle? - James Tanton Can you solve the risky disk riddle? - James Tanton
3 months ago En
Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd -- Your antivirus squad is up against a code that’s hijacked your mainframe. What you’ve learned from other infected systems, right before they went dark, is that it likes to toy with antivirus agents in a very peculiar way— and you’re the agent that’s been selected to go up against the malware. Can you figure out which disk that runs your mainframe has been corrupted? James Tanton shows how. Lesson by James Tanton, directed by Igor Coric, Artrake Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram --------
Why don’t we cover the desert with solar panels? - Dan Kwartler Why don’t we cover the desert with solar panels? - Dan Kwartler
3 months ago En
Explore what would happen if we covered the Sahara Desert in solar panels, and the possibility of it solving our energy crisis. -- Stretching over roughly nine million square kilometers and with sands reaching temperatures of up to 80° Celsius, the Sahara Desert receives about 22 million terawatt hours of energy from the Sun every year. That’s well over 100 times more energy than humanity consumes annually. So, could covering the desert with solar panels solve our energy problems? Dan Kwartler digs into the possibility. Lesson by Dan Kwartler, directed by Christoph Sarow, AIM Creative Studios. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http:
Can love and independence coexist? - Tanya Boucicaut Can love and independence coexist? - Tanya Boucicaut
3 months ago En
Dig into Zora Neale Hurston’s classic novel, “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” which follows Janie Crawford in her search for love and agency. -- Baritone thunder. Snarling winds. Consuming downpours. Okeechobee, the hurricane of 1928, forced many to flee their ruined communities. But for Janie Crawford, it inspired an unexpected homecoming. So begins Zora Neale Hurston’s acclaimed novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” about a Black woman’s quest for love and agency. Tanya Boucicaut dives into this classic of the Harlem Renaissance. Lesson by Tanya Boucicaut, directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http:
Where will you be able to live in 20 years? - Carol Farbotko and Ingrid Boas Where will you be able to live in 20 years? - Carol Farbotko and Ingrid Boas
3 months ago En
Explore how coastal communities are impacted by climate change and how they’re adapting to rising sea levels and extreme weather. -- Humanity has always adapted to changing weather and moved to regions that best support cultural lifestyles and livelihoods. However, the rise in extreme weather is endangering coastal communities, and even for those with the resources to take action, the pace and nature of climate change has made it difficult to adapt. Carol Farbotko and Ingrid Boas dig into the challenges of climate mobility. Lesson by Carol Farbotko and Ingrid Boas, directed by Ouros Animation, The Animation Workshop. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Fi
What happened to the lost Kingdom of Kush? - Geoff Emberling What happened to the lost Kingdom of Kush? - Geoff Emberling
3 months ago En
Trace the rise and fall of the Kingdom of Kush, an overlooked ancient African civilization which fought off both the Egyptians and Romans. -- Along the Nile River, in what is now northern Sudan, lay the ancient civilization of Kush. Though they were once conquered by a powerful neighbor, the kings and queens of Kush would go on to successfully challenge two of the most dominant empires in history: the Egyptians and the Romans. So what happened to this African kingdom? Geoff Emberling details the rise and fall of the Kush empire. Lesson by Geoff Emberling, directed by Carlos Rupit & Lizeth Rodríguez. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter:
The genes you don't get from your parents (but can't live without) - Devin Shuman The genes you don't get from your parents (but can't live without) - Devin Shuman
3 months ago En
Dig into the essential role that mitochondrial DNA played in the evolution of living things on Earth, and find out why it’s still evolving. -- Inside our cells, each of us has a second set of genes completely separate from our 23 pairs of chromosomes. And this isn’t just true for humans— it’s true of every animal, plant, and fungus on Earth. This second genome belongs to our mitochondria, an organelle inside our cells. So why are they so different from anything else in our bodies? Devin Shuman explores the purpose of mitochondrial DNA. Lesson by Devin Shuman, directed by Luísa M H Copetti, Hype CG. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: h
Ancient Greece's greatest erotic artist - Diane J. Rayor Ancient Greece's greatest erotic artist - Diane J. Rayor
3 months ago En
Discover the works of erotic poet and songwriter Sappho, and find out why only fragments of her poetry still survive. -- Over 2,500 years ago, one of ancient Greece’s most celebrated popstars and erotic poets enraptured listeners. The singer-songwriter offered a uniquely intimate perspective on love, passion, and longing, and was the first on record to combine the words “bitter” and “sweet,” to describe the ups and downs of romance. So, who was this revered figure? Diane J. Rayor uncovers the writings of Sappho. Lesson by Diane J. Rayor, directed by Amir Houshang Moein. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Pee
How a concubine became the ruler of Egypt - Abdallah Ewis How a concubine became the ruler of Egypt - Abdallah Ewis
3 months ago En Ru
Get to know the story of Shajar Al-Durr, who was born enslaved and rose to become the ruler of Egypt. -- The year is 1249 CE. King Louis IX is sailing the Nile, threatening to overthrow the sultan and capture Egypt. Egypt’s commanders ask the sultan’s wife, Shajar Al-Durr, to report this news to the injured sultan. But they don’t know the truth: the sultan is dead, and she is secretly ruling in his stead. Who was this impressive woman? Abdallah Ewis details the reign of the Sultana of Egypt. Lesson by Abdallah Ewis, directed by Elahe Baloochi. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://b
Can you solve the nuclear override riddle? - Alex Rosenthal Can you solve the nuclear override riddle? - Alex Rosenthal
4 months ago En Ru
Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd -- Smuggling yourself aboard the rogue submarine was the easy part. Hacking into the nuclear missile launch override — a little harder. And you’ve got a problem: you don’t have the override code. You know you need the same numbers that were used to authorize the launch, but one wrong answer will lock you out. Can you figure out what numbers to enter to stop nuclear war? Alex Rosenthal shows how. Lesson by Alex Rosenthal, directed by Igor Coric, Artrake Studio. A very special thank you to Jon Schneider and Brian Chen, who wrote the original version of this puzzle for the 2021 MIT Mystery Hunt and were inestimably helpful in adapting it to this format. You can find that original puzzle — and many more like it — at: https://bit.ly/MITHunt Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------
The secrets of the world’s most famous symphony - Hanako Sawada The secrets of the world’s most famous symphony - Hanako Sawada
4 months ago En
Discover what makes Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony Number Five a musical masterpiece, and uncover the story behind its inception. -- Eight ferocious notes open one of the most explosive pieces of music ever composed. Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony Number Five premiered in 1808, and quickly won acclaim. Its central motif and raw emotionality have continued to resound through the ages. So what exactly makes Beethoven’s Fifth so captivating? Hanako Sawada uncovers the story behind this musical masterpiece. Lesson by Hanako Sawada, directed by Yael Reisfeld. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Insta
You could have a secret twin (but not the way you think) - Kayla Mandel Sheets You could have a secret twin (but not the way you think) - Kayla Mandel Sheets
4 months ago En
Download a free audiobook version of “The Vanishing Half“ and support TED-Ed's nonprofit mission: https://www.audible.com/ted-ed -- While searching for a kidney donor, Karen Keegan stumbled upon a mystery. After undergoing genetic testing, it turned out that some of her cells had a completely different set of genes from the others. And this second set of genes belonged to her twin sister— who had never been born. How did this happen? Kayla Mandel Sheets explores the condition known as chimerism. Lesson by Kayla Mandel Sheets, directed by Luísa M H Copetti, Hype CG. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us
Earth's mysterious red glow, explained - Zoe Pierrat Earth's mysterious red glow, explained - Zoe Pierrat
4 months ago En
Explore the phenomenon and uses of chlorophyll fluorescence, a small amount of light emitted by plants during photosynthesis. -- In 2009, a satellite circled Earth, scanning and sorting the wavelengths reflecting off the planet’s surface. Researchers noticed something baffling: an unexpected wavelength of unknown origin. They tried looking at Earth with only this wavelength, and saw the planet covered in a red hue of varying intensity. So, what was going on? Zoe Pierrat explores the science of chlorophyll fluorescence. Lesson by Zoe Pierrat, directed by Denis Chapon, The Animation Workshop. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bi
What makes a language... a language? - Martin Hilpert What makes a language... a language? - Martin Hilpert
4 months ago En
Dig into the distinction between a language and a dialect, and uncover the history of standardized languages. -- Outside of China, Mandarin and Cantonese are often referred to as Chinese dialects, despite being even more dissimilar than Spanish and Italian. On the other hand, speakers of Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, which are three distinct languages, can usually communicate with each other in their native tongues. So, when is speech considered a dialect versus a language? Martin Hilpert investigates. Lesson by Martin Hilpert, directed by Luísa M H Copetti, Hype CG. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep
The rise and fall of the Lakota Empire - Pekka Hämäläinen The rise and fall of the Lakota Empire - Pekka Hämäläinen
4 months ago En
Trace the rise and fall of the Lakota Empire which, at their height, were the most dominant power in the American West. -- In 1776, a powerful empire was born in North America. The Lakotas had reached the Black Hills, the most sacred place and most coveted buffalo hunting grounds in the western plains. Located in what is now South Dakota, control of the Black Hills, or Paha Sapa, marked the tribe as the dominant power in the American West. Pekka Hämäläinen explores the rise and fall of the Lakota Empire. Lesson by Pekka Hämäläinen, directed by Mohammad Babakoohi & Yijia Cao. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitte
What is MSG, and is it actually bad for you? - Sarah E. Tracy What is MSG, and is it actually bad for you? - Sarah E. Tracy
4 months ago En
Dig into the seasoning known as MSG, and find out how this flavoring was developed and if it’s actually bad for your health. -- In 1968, Dr. Robert Ho Man Kwok felt ill after dinner at a Chinese restaurant and wrote a letter to a medical journal connecting his symptoms to MSG. His letter would change the world’s relationship with MSG, inspiring international panic, biased science, and sensationalist journalism for the next 40 years. So what is this seasoning, and is it actually bad for you? Sarah E. Tracy investigates. Lesson by Sarah E. Tracy, directed by Alopra Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Pe
The infamous overpopulation bet: Simon vs. Ehrlich - Soraya Field Fiorio The infamous overpopulation bet: Simon vs. Ehrlich - Soraya Field Fiorio
4 months ago En Ru
Discover an infamous bet between two professors, which sought to predict whether the earth would run out of resources due to a growing human population. -- In 1980, Paul Ehrlich and Julian Simon bet $1,000 on a question with stakes that couldn’t be higher: would the earth run out of resources to sustain a growing human population? They bet $200 on the price of five metals. If the price of a metal decreased or held steady over the next decade, Simon won. If the price increased, Ehrlich won. So, what happened? Soraya Field Fiorio investigates. Lesson by Soraya Field Fiorio, directed by Avi Ofer. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http:/
Is this the most successful animal ever? - Nigel Hughes Is this the most successful animal ever? - Nigel Hughes
5 months ago En
Discover the creatures known as trilobites, one of Earth’s most successful early animals, and find out what led to their extinction. -- Prevailing for around 270 million years and encompassing more than 20,000 distinct species, trilobites are some of the most successful lifeforms in Earth’s history. When they sprung into existence, they were among the most diverse and sophisticated organisms on the planet and so had a unique perspective on the ancient world. Nigel Hughes details the rise and fall of these hardy creatures. Lesson by Nigel Hughes, directed by Zsuzsanna Kreif, The Animation Workshop. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: ht
How we can detect pretty much anything - Hélène Morlon and Anna Papadopoulou How we can detect pretty much anything - Hélène Morlon and Anna Papadopoulou
5 months ago En
Explore how scientists use environmental DNA (eDNA) in a technique called DNA metabarcoding to find and track species. -- Scientists have been staking out a forest in Montana for an animal that’s notoriously tricky to find. Camera traps haven’t offered definitive evidence, and experts can’t identify its tracks with certainty. But within the past decades, researchers have developed methods that can detect even the most elusive species. So how does it work? Hélène Morlon & Anna Papadopoulou dig into DNA metabarcoding. Lesson by Hélène Morlon and Anna Papadopoulou, directed by Blok Magnaye. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.l
Can you outsmart the slippery slope fallacy? - Elizabeth Cox Can you outsmart the slippery slope fallacy? - Elizabeth Cox
5 months ago En Ru
Dig into the slippery slope fallacy, which assumes that one step will lead to a series of events that lead to an extreme— often bad— scenario. -- It’s 1954. Vietnamese nationalists are on the verge of securing an independent Vietnam under communist leader Ho Chi Minh. U.S. President Eisenhower claims that by virtue of the "falling domino principle," communist control of Vietnam would lead to the global spread of authoritarian communist regimes. Can you spot the problem with this argument? Elizabeth Cox explores the slippery slope fallacy. Lesson by Elizabeth Cox, directed by TOGETHER. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/
How the COVID-19 vaccines were created so quickly - Kaitlyn Sadtler and Elizabeth Wayne How the COVID-19 vaccines were created so quickly - Kaitlyn Sadtler and Elizabeth Wayne
5 months ago En Ru
Discover how mRNA vaccines help your immune system fight viral infections and how this decades-old technology was used to create COVID-19 vaccines. -- In the 20th century, most vaccines took over a decade to research, test, and produce. But the vaccines for COVID-19 were cleared for emergency use in less than 11 months. The secret behind this speed is a medical technology that’s been developing for decades: the mRNA vaccine. So how do these revolutionary vaccines work? Kaitlyn Sadtler and Elizabeth Wayne dig into the science of mRNA technology. Lesson by Kaitlyn Sadtler and Elizabeth Wayne, directed by Igor Ćorić, Artrake Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TED
The secret society of the Great Dismal Swamp - Dan Sayers The secret society of the Great Dismal Swamp - Dan Sayers
5 months ago En
Uncover the history of the hidden communities that inhabited the Great Dismal Swamp in North America. -- Straddling Virginia and North Carolina is an area that was once described as the “most repulsive of American possessions.” By 1728, it was known as the Great Dismal Swamp. But while many deemed it uninhabitable, recent findings suggest that a hidden society persisted in the Swamp until the mid-1800’s. So, who lived there? And what happened to them? Dan Sayers uncovers a lost civilization. Lesson by Dan Sayers, directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram:
Can you solve the giant spider riddle? - Dan Finkel Can you solve the giant spider riddle? - Dan Finkel
5 months ago En
Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd -- Once every century, the world’s greatest spiders gather to compete in a series of grueling games. The winner will become the next arachnomonarch, able to command all the world’s spiders to their will. That day is today, and for the first time, you’re casting your name into the ring. Can you attain the mantle of spider supremacy? Dan Finkel shows how. Lesson by Dan Finkel, directed by Igor Ćorić, Artrake Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram ---------------------------------------------- Ke
The method that can "prove" almost anything - James A. Smith The method that can "prove" almost anything - James A. Smith
5 months ago En Ru
Explore the data analysis method known as p-hacking, where data is misrepresented as statistically significant. -- In 2011, a group of researchers conducted a study designed to find an impossible result. Their study involved real people, truthfully reported data, and commonplace statistical analyses. So how did they do it? The answer lies in a statistical method scientists often use to try to figure out whether their results mean something, or if they’re random noise. James A. Smith explores p-hacking. Lesson by James A. Smith, directed by Anton Bogaty. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram
What causes seizures, and how can we treat them? - Christopher E. Gaw What causes seizures, and how can we treat them? - Christopher E. Gaw
5 months ago En
Discover what we know — and don’t know — about the causes and treatment of seizures, and what to do if you encounter someone experiencing a seizure. -- Nearly 3,000 years ago, a Babylonian tablet described a curious illness called “miqtu” that caused symptoms ranging from facial twitching to full body convulsions. Today we know miqtu as seizures, and modern medicine has developed numerous treatments for those experiencing them. So what causes seizures, and is there any way to stop them from happening? Christopher E. Gaw investigates. Lesson by Christopher E. Gaw, directed by Bálint Gelley, CUB Animation Ltd. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on
Iceland's superpowered underground volcanoes - Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl Iceland's superpowered underground volcanoes - Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl
5 months ago En Ru
Explore how geothermal energy— the heat in the Earth’s crust— is being used to create renewable electricity and power. -- While the weather in Iceland is often cold, wet, and windy, a nearly endless supply of heat bubbles away below the surface. In fact, almost every building in the country is heated by geothermal energy in a process with virtually no carbon emissions. So how exactly does this renewable energy work? Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl explores the two primary models for harnessing the planet's natural heat. Lesson by Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl, directed by Charlotte Arene. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter
Venom spurs, duck bills and spiky penises: A year in the life a platypus - Gilad Bino Venom spurs, duck bills and spiky penises: A year in the life a platypus - Gilad Bino
6 months ago En Ru
Trace a year in the life of a platypus, and explore how the animal’s unique adaptations ensure its survival. -- Waddling along the parched Australian earth, a female platypus is searching for fresh water. Over the past year, a severe drought turned rivers and streams to mere trickles. She barely survived and was unable to reproduce. Could the next year bring a change in luck? Gilad Bino traces a year in the life of a platypus, and explores the unique adaptations that ensure this ancient species' survival. Lesson by Gilad Bino, directed by Petya Zlateva, Compote Collective. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter
The rise and fall of the Kingdom of Man - Andrew McDonald The rise and fall of the Kingdom of Man - Andrew McDonald
6 months ago En Ru
Discover the medieval empire of the Isle of Man and the Hebrides, and how a dynasty of sea kings rose to power. -- On a small island in the Irish Sea, fortresses preside over the rugged shores. This unlikely location was the birthplace of a medieval empire that lasted 200 years. Rulers built coastal fortresses on cliffs, roved the seaways, and threw themselves into epic battles to consolidate control over an impressive maritime kingdom. Andrew McDonald uncovers this forgotten dynasty of sea kings. Lesson by Andrew McDonald, directed by WOW-HOW Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram:
The paradox at the heart of mathematics: Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem - Marcus du Sautoy The paradox at the heart of mathematics: Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem - Marcus du Sautoy
6 months ago En
Explore Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem, a discovery which changed what we know about mathematical proofs and statements. -- Consider the following sentence: “This statement is false.” Is that true? If so, that would make the statement false. But if it’s false, then the statement is true. This sentence creates an unsolvable paradox; if it’s not true and it’s not false– what is it? This question led a logician to a discovery that would change mathematics forever. Marcus du Sautoy digs into Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem. Lesson by Marcus du Sautoy, directed by BASA. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us o
Why can’t governments print an unlimited amount of money? - Jonathan Smith Why can’t governments print an unlimited amount of money? - Jonathan Smith
6 months ago En
Explore the economic strategy of quantitative easing, where a central bank purchases bonds in order to boost the economy. -- In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic rocked economies worldwide. Millions of people lost their jobs, and many businesses struggled to survive or shut down. Governments responded with some of the largest economic relief packages in history— the US alone spent $2.2 trillion on a first round of relief. So where did all this money come from? Jonathan Smith explores the strategy of quantitative easing. Lesson by Jonathan Smith, directed by Serin İnan, Kozmonot Animation Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http
The most notorious scientific feud in history - Lukas Rieppel The most notorious scientific feud in history - Lukas Rieppel
6 months ago En Ru
Get to know one of the most infamous scientific rivalries in history, known as the Bone Wars, where two scientists competed to find dinosaur fossils. -- After the California Gold Rush of 1848, settlers streamed west to strike it rich. In addition to precious metals, they unearthed another treasure: dinosaur bones. Two wealthy scientists in particular— Othniel Charles Marsh and Edward Drinker Cope— competed to uncover these prehistoric monsters. Lukas Rieppel digs into one of the most notorious scientific feuds in history, known as the Bone Wars. Lesson by Lukas Rieppel, directed by Michael Kalopaidis, Zedem Media. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find
History's deadliest king - by Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja History's deadliest king - by Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja
6 months ago En
Dig into the Rubber Terror, the period in which King Leopold II’s horrific regime in the Congo resulted in the deaths of 10 million people. -- In 1904, Chief Lontulu laid 110 twigs in front of a foreign commission. Every twig represented a person in his village who died because of King Leopold’s brutal regime in the Congo. His testimony joined hundreds of others to help bring an end to one of the greatest atrocities in human history. Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja details the horrific abuses of Leopold’s occupation and looting of the Congo. Lesson by Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, directed by Héloïse Dorsan Rachet. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twit
Could we build a wooden skyscraper? - Stefan Al Could we build a wooden skyscraper? - Stefan Al
6 months ago En
Explore the viability of wooden skyscrapers, and see how cross-laminated timber (CLT) helps make these once impossible structures possible. -- Towering 85 meters above the Norwegian countryside, Mjøstårnet is the world’s tallest wooden building, made almost entirely from the trees of neighboring forests. But as recently as the end of the 20th century, engineers thought it was impossible to build a wooden building over 6 stories tall. So how do wooden structures like this compare to steel and concrete skyscrapers? Stefan Al investigates. Lesson by Stefan Al, directed by Franz Palomares. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/
The dark history of the Chinese Exclusion Act - Robert Chang The dark history of the Chinese Exclusion Act - Robert Chang
6 months ago En
Dig into the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which suspended Chinese immigration to the U.S. and blocked Chinese immigrants from citizenship. -- In 1882, the United States Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, the first federal law that restricted immigration based explicitly on nationality. In practice, the Act banned entry to all ethnically Chinese immigrants besides diplomats, and prohibited existing immigrants from obtaining citizenship. Robert Chang details the lasting impact the Act had on immigrant rights and freedoms. Lesson by Robert Chang, directed by Mohammad Babakoohi & Yijia Cao. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: htt
What you can do with an extra jaw - Darien Satterfield What you can do with an extra jaw - Darien Satterfield
6 months ago En
Discover the adaptation of the pharyngeal jaw, a secondary set of jaws that allow fish to capture and eat their prey at the same time. -- After stalking a cuttlefish, a moray eel finally pounces. As the eel snags the mollusk in its teeth, its prey struggles to escape. But before it can wiggle away, a second set of teeth lunge from the eel’s throat. This adaptation is called a pharyngeal jaw, and is one of the most common adaptations under the sea. Darien Satterfield shares how this incredible skeletal mechanism works. Lesson by Darien Satterfield, directed by Zack Williams. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitte
How one person saved over 2,000 children from the Nazis - Iseult Gillespie How one person saved over 2,000 children from the Nazis - Iseult Gillespie
6 months ago En
Get to know the story of Irena Sendler, a social worker who saved over 2,000 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII. -- In 1943, Irena Sendler and Janina Grabowska froze when they heard Gestapo pounding on the front door. Knowing she was minutes from arrest, Irena tossed Janina her most dangerous possession: a glass jar containing the names of over 2,000 Jewish children she’d smuggled to safety from the Warsaw Ghetto. Who was this courageous woman? Iseult Gillespie details the life and legacy of Irena Sendler. Lesson by Iseult Gillespie, directed by Chloé Gérard. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitte
Can you cheat death by solving this riddle? - Shravan S K Can you cheat death by solving this riddle? - Shravan S K
7 months ago En
Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd -- You and your best friend Bill are the greatest bards in the kingdom— but maybe not the brightest. Your hit song has insulted the king and now you’re slated for execution. Luckily, Death is a connoisseur of most excellent music and has decided to give you a chance to escape your fate. Can you beat him at a life-sized game of Snakes and Ladders and live to sing another day? Shravan S K shows how. Lesson by Shravan S K, directed by Igor Coric, Artrake Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram ----
These salamanders snack on each other (but don't die) - Luis Zambrano These salamanders snack on each other (but don't die) - Luis Zambrano
7 months ago En Ru
Discover the extraordinary regenerative powers of the axolotl, a salamander native to Mexico and one of science’s most studied animals. -- Axolotls are one of science’s most studied animals. Why, you ask? These extraordinary salamanders are masters of regeneration: they can flawlessly regenerate body parts ranging from amputated limbs and crushed spines to parts of their eyes and brains. So, how do they do it? And what other secrets are they keeping? Luis Zambrano explores the baffling biology of the axolotl. Lesson by Luis Zambrano, directed by Lizete Upīte. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Ins
Why was India split into two countries? - Haimanti Roy Why was India split into two countries? - Haimanti Roy
7 months ago En Ru
Dig into the 1947 Partition of India, when Britain split the region into two states, India and Pakistan, and the mass migrations and violence that followed. -- In 1947, the British viceroy announced that after 200 years of British rule, India would gain independence and be partitioned into Hindu India and Muslim Pakistan. What followed was one of the largest and bloodiest forced migrations in history: an estimated 1 million people lost their lives. What caused this violent aftermath? Haimanti Roy details the lasting legacies of the Partition of India. Lesson by Haimanti Roy, directed by Jagriti Khirwar & Raghav Arumugam. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFaceboo
What few people know about the program that "saved" America - Meg Jacobs What few people know about the program that "saved" America - Meg Jacobs
7 months ago En Ru
Explore the successes and failures of FDR’s New Deal, a set of legislation during the Great Depression which aimed to save the US economy. -- In 1932, one in four Americans was unemployed, marking the highest unemployment rate in the country’s history. The Democratic presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt promised a New Deal— a comprehensive set of legislation to support struggling citizens and put the country back to work. Meg Jacobs digs into the policies of this bold campaign and how it didn’t fully live up to its promises. Lesson by Meg Jacobs, directed by Anton Bogaty. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEd
A brief history of toilets - Francis de los Reyes A brief history of toilets - Francis de los Reyes
7 months ago En
Explore the history of the toilet and how waste management has evolved from from ancient Mesopotamia to modern day. -- On sunny days, citizens of ancient Rome could be found exchanging news and gossip while attending to more urgent business at the public latrines. Today, most cultures consider trips to the restroom to be a more private occasion. But even when going alone, our shared sewage infrastructure is one of the most pivotal inventions in human history. Francis de los Reyes shares the history of the toilet. Lesson by Francis de los Reyes, directed by Igor Coric, Artrake Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TE
The sharks that hunt in forests - Luka Seamus Wright The sharks that hunt in forests - Luka Seamus Wright
7 months ago En Ru
Discover the unique adaptations of marine forests, the ecosystems that provide food and shelter for sharks and diverse coastal species. -- Forests don’t usually come to mind as a habitat for sharks. But marine forests provide a home for 35% of the world’s sharks. Mangrove forests in particular function as an essential bridge between land and sea and have evolved various adaptations that protect them and their resident sharks. Luka Seamus Wright explores these unique and vital ecosystems. Lesson by Luka Seamus Wright, directed by William Cifuentes, Lucy Animation Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Pee
Can you trust your memory? - Sheila Marie Orfano Can you trust your memory? - Sheila Marie Orfano
7 months ago En
Explore the Rashomon effect, where individuals give significantly different but equally believable accounts of the same event. -- A samurai is found dead in a quiet bamboo grove. One by one, the crime’s only known witnesses recount their version of the events. But as they each tell their tale, it becomes clear that every testimony is plausible yet different. And each witness implicates themselves. What’s going on? Sheila Marie Orfano explores the phenomenon of warring perspectives known as the Rashomon effect. Lesson by Sheila Marie Orfano, directed by Jeremiah Dickey. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Pee
Ugly History: The U.S. Syphilis Experiment - Susan M. Reverby Ugly History: The U.S. Syphilis Experiment - Susan M. Reverby
7 months ago En Ru
Dig into the unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Study, which spanned 40 years and lied to its participants about receiving treatment for syphilis. -- Afflicting nearly 1 in 10 Americans, syphilis was ravaging the U.S. in the 1930s. Many doctors believed syphilis affected Black and white patients differently, and the Public Health Service launched an experiment to investigate, recruiting 600 Black men to take part. But the study was centered on a lie: the men wouldn’t actually receive treatment. Susan Reverby details the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Lesson by Susan M. Reverby, directed by Ouros Animation. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http:/
A day in the life of an Ancient Greek oracle - Mark Robinson A day in the life of an Ancient Greek oracle - Mark Robinson
7 months ago En Ru
Follow Aristonike, an Oracle-in-training in Delphi, as she studies to become the Pythia and communicate Apollo’s will and prophecies. -- As the sun rises over Delphi in 500 BCE, Aristonike hurries to the temple of Apollo where a single oracle known as the Pythia communicates Apollo’s will. Reserved only for women, this is the most important job in the city— and one that Aristonike will soon have to take on if city council officials decide she meets their standards. Mark Robinson outlines a day in the life of an Oracle-in-training. Lesson by Mark Robinson, directed by WOW-HOW Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TED
Why do we have hair in such random places? - Nina G. Jablonski Why do we have hair in such random places? - Nina G. Jablonski
7 months ago En Ru
Discover how humans lost their fur as they evolved from primates, and why we still have hair on our bodies. -- We have lots in common with our closest primate relatives. But comparatively, humans seem a bit… underdressed. Instead of thick fur covering our bodies, many of us mainly have hair on top of our heads— and a few other places. So, how did we get so naked? And why do we have hair where we do? Nina G. Jablonski explores the evolution of human hair. Lesson by Nina G. Jablonski, directed by Igor Coric, Artrake Studio. Support Our Non-Profit Mission ---------------------------------------------- Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Check out our merch: http://bit.ly/TEDEDShop ---------------------------------------------- Connect With Us ---------------------------------------------- Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram
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