TED-Ed
TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed’s growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com). Want to suggest an idea for a TED-Ed animation or get involved with TED-Ed? Visit our website at: http://ed.ted.com/get_involved. Also, consider donating to us on Patreon! By doing so, you directly support our mission and receive some pretty awesome rewards: https://www.patreon.com/teded For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film, or in an online course), please submit a Media Request using this link: https://media-requests.ted.com/

1400 videos
Why do people fear the wrong things? - Gerd Gigerenzer Why do people fear the wrong things? - Gerd Gigerenzer
2 days ago En
How can we use statistics to evaluate risk? Dig into the difference between relative risk and absolute risk and how each is used in the news. -- A new drug reduces the risk of heart attacks by 40%. Shark attacks are up by a factor of two. Drinking a liter of soda per day doubles your chance of developing cancer. These are all examples of a common way risk is presented in news articles, and can often be misleading. So how can we better evaluate risk? Gerd Gigerenzer explores the difference between relative and absolute risk. Lesson by Gerd Gigerenzer, directed by Visorama. Animator's website: https://www.visorama.tv/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-likely-is-a-shark-attack-gerd-gigerenzer Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Rare Media, Rayo, Faizan , Elizabeth Gu, Nazmul Idris, Po Foon Kwong, Siobhan O'Connor Gwozdz, NinjaBoffin, Jesse Jurman, Josue Perez Miranda, Jan-Erik, Scott Markley, Kaitlyn holland, Elija Peterson, Michele Lynn Rose, Jai Prasanth, Vack91, David Lucsanyi, Xavier dupont, Marisa Miller, Boytsov Ilya, Steven Razey, Javier Aldavaz, Nathan Giusti, Mada Arslan, Joichiro Yamada, Ritul Raghavan, Aline de Paula Zillig, Yambu Ganesh Shaw, Abeer Rajbeen, John Hong, Minh Tran, Helen Lee, Anthony Benedict, Turine Tran, Mathew Samuel, Karthik Balsubramanian, Lee, Livia-Alexandra Sarban, Annastasshia Ames, João Henrique Rodrigues, Sebastiaan Hols, Aries SW, SANG HAN, Amy Lopez, ReuniteKorea, Vinh-Thuy Nguyen, Liz Candee, Clovis Norroy and Danielle Downs.
Vultures: the acid-puking, plague-busting heroes of the ecosystem - Kenny Coogan Vultures: the acid-puking, plague-busting heroes of the ecosystem - Kenny Coogan
3 days ago En
Explore the essential role vultures play in cleaning our ecosystems and why their conservation is key to a healthy planet. -- In the African grasslands, a gazelle suffering from tuberculosis takes its last breath. The animal’s corpse threatens to infect the water, but for the vulture, this isn’t a problem: it’s a feast. With a stomach of steel that can digest diseased meat and waste, vultures are essential to removing dangerous pathogens from ecosystems. Kenny Coogan explores the importance of the desert’s cleanup crew. Lesson by Kenny Coogan, directed by Mali Mamut. Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/vultures-the-acid-puking-plague-busting-heroes-of-the-ecosystem-kenny-coogan Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Paul Aldred-Bann, Manav parmar, Susan Wang, Utkarsh Dubey, Thawsitt, Xuebicoco, Jezabel, Maeve, Kim Humphrey, Kristen Damas, JackKeyton, Matthew D. Vigil, Amin Shahril, Adriano Fontes, Xiao Yu, Fatima Kried, Aravind Battaje, Melissa Suarez, Jason Duncan, Brian A. Dunn, Francisco Amaya, Daisuke Goto, Matt Switzler, Chhunheng Veng, Leonardo Monrroy, Sumedh Ghaisas, Guhten, Amer Harb, Dowey Baothman, Norbert Orgován, Shafeeq Ansari, Gabriel Balsa, Maryam Sultan, Bethany Connor, Jeremy Shimanek, Adam Foreman, Sebastiaan Vleugels, Lâm Nguyễn, Mark Byers, Bradley Heinold, Monkeypatcher, Laurence McMillan, Connor Roberts, Dmitry Neverov, Tonya Ratliff-Garrison, Avinash Amarnath, Eric McDaniel, Cristian Cristian, France Lipužič and EdoKun.
Spells, threats, and dragons: The secret messages of Viking runestones - Jesse Byock Spells, threats, and dragons: The secret messages of Viking runestones - Jesse Byock
1 week ago En
Learn the history of Viking runes, the ancient Norse language of symbols that make up an alphabet called the futhark. -- With their navigational skills and advanced longships, the Vikings sustained their seafaring for over 300 years. But for all their might, they left few monuments. Instead, fragments of stone, bark and bone found in the sites of ancient settlements provide the keys to their culture. Many of these objects are inscribed with Old Norse written in runic letters. Jesse Byock explores the ancient language. Lesson by Jesse Byock, directed by Lisa LaBracio. Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/spells-threats-and-dragons-the-secret-messages-of-viking-runestones-jesse-byock Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Chung Wah Gnapp, Amber Alexander, Robert Patrick, Pi Guanghui, Barbara Younker, Ai Ejima, Soma Ali, Roman Pinchuk, Raheem, Hector Quintanilla, Leen Mshasha, Mariana Ortega, Danny Romard, James Bruening, Ricki Daniel Marbun, Malcolm Callis, Sabrina Gonzalez, Al the Scottish Wildcat, سلطان الخليفي, Alexander Walls, Della Palacios, Vik Nagjee, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Adi V, Andrew Bosco, Craig Sheldon, Rishi Pasham, Joanne Luce, Jason A Saslow, Mary Sawyer, Scott Gass, Ruth Fang, Mayank Kaul, Kathryn J Hammond, Max Shuai Tang, Terry Minion, Sami Khan, Rob Johnson, Abdullah Abdulaziz, Angelo Urzua-Milla, Tommy Lewis, leorene, Mahina Bachiller, Marcus Andre Nery, Bruce Vieira Lopes, Chef, Charmaine Hanson, Michael Goldberg and Lydia Pflieger.
How do blood transfusions work? - Bill Schutt How do blood transfusions work? - Bill Schutt
1 week ago En
Dive into the history of the life-saving procedure of blood transfusions and how it has evolved since the 17th century. -- In 1881, doctor William Halsted rushed to help his sister Minnie, who was hemorrhaging after childbirth. He quickly inserted a needle into his arm, withdrew his own blood, and transferred it to her. After a few uncertain minutes, she began to recover. What made this blood transfusion successful? Bill Schutt explains the history of the life-saving procedure. Lesson by Bill Schutt, directed Hype CG. Animator's website: https://www.luisacopetti.com/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-blood-transfusion-work-bill-schutt Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Laura Cameron Keith, Jen, Ellen Spertus, Cailin Ramsey, Markus Goldhacker, Leora Allen, Andras Radnothy, Chris, Arpita Singh, Vijayalakshmi, Marc Bilodeau, Peng, Tzu-Hsiang, paul g mohney, Maya Toll, Sebastian Regez, Bruno Hannud, Andreas Voltios, Shubham Arora, Ugur Doga Sezgin, Akinola Emmanuel, Kyanta Yap, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Ana Maria, Benjamin & Shannon Pinder, Ernest Chow, Bela Namyslik, Alan Froese, Anika Westburg, Nick Cozby, Shawar Khan, Michael Braun-Boghos, Rohan Gupta, Elizabeth Cruz, Yujing Jiang, Sarah Lundegaard, Vladimir Ivanchenko, Georg Gusewski, Rohit Lodha, Erica Zhuang, Aaron Henson, Julio Sabatés Rodríguez, Vivian & Gilbert Lee, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, ரமணன், John simmons, June Reiling, Khalid AlAli, Mickey Mikeworth, Nathaniel Lupus and Yansong Li.
The legend of Annapurna, Hindu goddess of nourishment - Antara Raychaudhuri & Iseult Gillespie The legend of Annapurna, Hindu goddess of nourishment - Antara Raychaudhuri & Iseult Gillespie
2 weeks ago En
Follow the legend of Parvati, the Hindu mother of the natural world, as she disappears from Earth and reemerges as Annapurna, the goddess of food. -- Historically, the union between Shiva and Parvati was a glorious one: a sacred combination which brought fertility and connection to all living things. Yet a rift had grown between these two forces. Setting out to prove the importance of her work, Parvati withdrew from the world and sent the Earth into darkness. Antara Raychaudhuri and Iseult Gillespie tell the story of the goddess Annapurna. Lesson by Antara Raychaudhuri and Iseult Gillespie, directed by Roxane Campoy. Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-legend-of-annapurna-hindu-goddess-of-nourishment-antara-raychaudhuri-and-iseult-gillespie Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Marylise CHAUFFETON, Karen Goepen-Wee, Sama aafghani, Mandeep Singh, Abhijit Kiran Valluri, Morgan Williams, Kris Siverhus, Jason Weinstein, Tony Trapuzzano, Devin Harris, Brandy Jones, Shawn Quichocho, Gi Nam Lee, Joy Love Om, Miloš Stevanović, Ghassan Alhazzaa, Yankai Liu, Pavel Zalevskiy, Claudia Mayfield, Stephanie Perozo, Joe Giamartino, Filip Dabrowski, Barbara Smalley, Megan Douglas, Tim Leistikow, Andrés Melo Gámez, Renhe Ji, Ka-Hei Law, Michal Salman, Peter Liu, Mark Morris, Catherine Sverko, Misaki Sato, Tan YH, Ph.D., Rodrigo Carballo, SookKwan Loong, Bev Millar, Merit Gamertsfelder, Lex Azevedo, Noa Shore, Taylor Hunter, Kyle Nguyen, MJ Tan Mingjie, Cristóbal Moenne, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Kevin Wong, Dawn Jordan, Yanira Santamaria, Prasanth Mathialagan and Savannah Scheelings.
One of the most epic engineering feats in history - Alex Gendler One of the most epic engineering feats in history - Alex Gendler
2 weeks ago En
Dig into the history of the construction of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge and how John Roebling designed a hybrid suspension system to build it. -- In the mid-19th century, suspension bridges were collapsing all across Europe. Their industrial cables frayed and snapped under the weight of their decks. So when German American engineer John Roebling proposed building the largest and most expensive suspension bridge ever conceived, New York City officials were understandably skeptical. Alex Gendler details the building of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge. Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Jeremiah Dickey. Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/epic-engineering-building-the-brooklyn-bridge-alex-gendler Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Susan Herder, Samuel Doerle, David Rosario, Dominik Kugelmann, Siamak H, Tracey Tobkin, Dwight Tevuk, Anthony Kudolo, Mrinalini, Yanuar Ashari, Ivan Todorović, Alex Schenkman, Brittiny Elman, Ryohky Araya, Paul Coupe, David Douglass, Ricardo Paredes, Bill Feaver, Eduardo Briceño, Arturo De Leon, Christophe Dessalles, Janie Jackson, Dr Luca Carpinelli, Heather Slater, Yuh Saito, Quentin Le Menez, Mattia Veltri, Fabian Amels, Sandra Tersluisen, PnDAA, Hugo Legorreta, Zhexi Shan, Gustavo Mendoza, Bárbara Nazaré, Josh Engel, Natalia Rico, Andrea Feliz, Eysteinn Guðnason, Bernardo Paulo, Victor E Karhel, Sydney Evans, Latora Slydell, Oyuntsengel Tseyen-Oidov, Noel Situ, Elliot Poulin, emily lam, Juan, Jordan Tang, Kent Logan and Alexandra Panzer
The accident that changed the world - Allison Ramsey and Mary Staicu The accident that changed the world - Allison Ramsey and Mary Staicu
2 weeks ago En
Learn how Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, and how the antibiotic has changed medicine and the treatment of infections. -- In 1928, scientist Alexander Fleming returned to his lab and found something unexpected: a colony of mold growing on a Petri dish he’d forgotten to place in his incubator. And around this colony of mold was a zone completely and surprisingly clear of bacteria. What was this mysterious phenomenon? Allison Ramsey and Mary Staicu detail the discovery of penicillin and how it transformed medicine. Lesson by Allison Ramsey and Mary Staicu, directed by WOW-HOW Studio. Animator's website: https://wow-how.com/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-accident-that-changed-the-world-allison-ramsey-and-mary-staicu Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Katrina Harding, Gerald Onyango, alessandra tasso, Astia Rizki Safitri, Côme Vincent, Antony Lee, Melissa Sorrells, Rakshit Kothari, Doreen Reynolds-Consolati, Simon Holst Ravn, Manognya Chakrapani, Ayala Ron, Samantha Chow, Philippe Spoden, Phyllis Dubrow, Michelle Stevens-Stanford, Cas Jamieson, Ophelia Gibson Best, Amber Wood, Paul Schneider, Jun Cai, Tim Robinson, Henrique 'Sorín' Cassús, cnorahs, Lyn-z Schulte, Elaine Fitzpatrick, Karthik Cherala, Clarence E. Harper Jr., Milad Mostafavi, Аркадий Скайуокер, Kiara Taylor, Louisa Lee, eden sher, Vignan Velivela, Sage Curie, Srikote Naewchampa, Tejas Dc, Khalifa Alhulail, Faiza Imtiaz, Martin Stephen, Jerome Froelich, Dan Paterniti, Jose Henrique Leopoldo e Silva, Mullaiarasu Sundaramurthy, Elnathan Joshua Bangayan, Caleb ross, Duo Xu, Quinn Shen, Marvin Vizuett and Sid.
Everything changed when the fire crystal got stolen - Alex Gendler Everything changed when the fire crystal got stolen - Alex Gendler
3 weeks ago En
This riddle was created in partnership with Brilliant. Practice more problem solving here: https://brilliant.org/TedEd/ -- Someone has tripped the magical alarms in the Element Temple. When you and the other monks arrive on the scene, you know you have a disaster on your hands. Four young apprentices broke into the temple’s inner chamber to steal the sacred element crystals. But when the alarm went off they panicked, and each of them swallowed a crystal. Can you determine who ate which crystal? Alex Gendler shows how. Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Artrake Studio. This riddle is adapted from a puzzle that originally appeared in Puzzles for Pleasure, by E.R. Emmet. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/everything... Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Derek Drescher, Mihail Radu Pantilimon, Amin Shahril, Mohamed Elsayed, Barthélémy Michalon, Chumi Ogbonna, Karlee Finch, Mohammad Said, jj5252, Kelvin Lam, Mauricio Basso, Athena Grace Franco, Tirath Singh Pandher, Melvin Williams, Tsz Hin Edmund Chan, Nicolas Silva, Raymond Lee, Kurt Almendras, Denise A Pitts, Abdallah Absi, Dee Wei, Richard A Berkley, Tim Armstrong, Daniel Nester, Hashem Al, denison martins fernandes, Doug Henry, Arlene Spiegelman, Michał Friedrich, Joshua Wasniewski, Maryam Dadkhah, Kristiyan Bonev, Keven Webb, Mihai Sandu, Deepak Iyer, Javid Gozalov, Emilia Alvarado, Jaime Arriola, Mirzat Tulafu, Lewis Westbury, Felipe Hoff, Rebecca Reineke, Cyrus Garay, Victoria Veretilo, Michael Aquilina, William Biersdorf, Patricia Alves Panagides, Valeria Sloan Vasquez, Mike Azarkman and Yvette Mocete.
The psychology of partisanship - Jay Van Bavel The psychology of partisanship - Jay Van Bavel
3 weeks ago En
Dig into the psychology of political partisanship, how to recognize it and what strategies can be used to combat it. -- Can someone’s political identity actually affect their ability to process information? The answer lies in a cognitive phenomenon known as partisanship. While identifying with social groups is an essential and healthy part of life, it can become a problem when the group’s beliefs are at odds with reality. So how can we recognize and combat partisanship? Jay Van Bavel shares helpful strategies. Lesson by Jay Van Bavel, directed by Patrick Smith. Animator's website: http://www.blendfilms.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/do-politics-make-us-irrational-jay-van-bavel Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Pavel Maksimov, Victoria Soler-Roig, Betsy Feathers, Samuel Barbas, Therapist Gus, Sai Krishna Koyoda, Elizabeth Parker, William Bravante, Irindany Sandoval, Mark wisdom, Brighteagle, Beatriz Inácio, Mighterbump, Pamela Harrison, Maija Chapman, Liana Switzer, Curtis Light, The Brock, Dianne Palomar, Edgar Campos Barrachina, Maria Lerchbaumer, Ever Granada, Marin Kovachev, Ravi S. Rāmphal, Penelope Misquitta, Tekin Gültekin, Jhuval , Hans Peng, Gaurav Mathur, Erik Biemans, Tony, Michelle, Katie and Josh Pedretti, Vaibhav Mirjolkar, Thomas Bahrman, Allan Hayes, Aidan Forero, Uday Kishore, Mikhail Shkirev, Devesh Kumar, Sunny Patel, Anuj Tomar, Lowell Fleming, David Petrovič, Hoai Nam Tran, Stina Boberg, Alexandrina Danifeld, Kack-Kyun Kim, Travis Wehrman, haventfiguredout, Caitlin de Falco and Ken.
The life, legacy & assassination of an African revolutionary - Lisa Janae Bacon The life, legacy & assassination of an African revolutionary - Lisa Janae Bacon
3 weeks ago En
Get to know the life of West African revolutionary Thomas Sankara, and his pursuit of liberating Burkina Faso from colonial rule. -- In 1972, Thomas Sankara was swept into the revolution seeking to wrest control of Madagascar from France’s lingering colonial rule. The protests inspired the West African native to read works by socialist leaders and seek wisdom from military strategy. Leaving Madagascar in 1973, he was determined to free his country from its colonial legacy. Lisa Bacon details the life of the revolutionary icon. Lesson by Lisa Janae Bacon, directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat. Animator's website: http://www.tomatico.net/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-life-legacy-assassination-of-an-african-revolutionary-lisa-janae-bacon Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Lawrence Teh Swee Kiang, BRENDAN NEALE, Jane White, Karmi Nguyen, John C. Vesey, Yelena Baykova, Harshita Jagdish Sahijwani, Won Jang, Nick Johnson, Tariq Keblaoui, Carlos H. Costa, Eimann P. Evarola, Aleksandr Lyozin, Mohamed Elsayed, Alan Wilder, Marcus Appelbaum, Francisco Leos, Kevin O'Leary, Les Howard, Ten Cha, Mehmet Yusuf Ertekin, Arlene Weston, phkphk123321, Jennifer Kurkoski, Ryan B Harvey, Austin Randall, Abhishek Bansal, Jayant Sahewal, Dian Atamyanov, igor romanenko, Jose Arcadio Valdes Franco, Brandy Sarver, Guy Hardy, Tu-Anh Nguyen, Karl Laius, Madee Lo, JY Kang, Marc Bou Zeid, Abhishek Goel, Charles A Hershberger, Coenraad Keuning, Robert Seik, Heidi Stolt, Alexis Hevia, Todd Gross, Brady Jones, Christina Salvatore, Zhong Ming Zenny Tan, Karisa Caudill and Bruno Pinho.
The Chasm | Think Like A Coder, Ep 6 The Chasm | Think Like A Coder, Ep 6
4 weeks ago En
The adventure continues! Episode 6: Ethic, Hedge, and Octavia must find a way to cross the bottomless ravine to get to the tower. Can they make it before the guards return? -- This is episode 6 of our animated series “Think Like A Coder.” This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. Lesson by Alex Rosenthal, directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio. Supported by Endless: https://endlessnetwork.com A special thank you to the programmers who assisted in the development of this series: Eric Wastl, Sara Kladky, Ryan Harvey, Dan Bernier, Eden Girma, Matt Gruskin, and James Griffith. The challenge in this episode was inspired by a problem found in Gayle Laakmann McDowell’s book "Cracking the Coding Interview." Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-chasm-think-like-a-coder-ep-6 Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! zjweele13, Anna-Pitschna Kunz, Edla Paniguel, Elena Crescia, Thomas Mungavan, Alejandro Cachoua, Jaron Blackburn, Yoga Trapeze Wanderlust, Sandy Nasser, Venkat Venkatakrishnan, Nicolle Fieldsend-Roxborough, John Saveland, Jason Garcia, Robson Martinho, Martin Lau, Senjo Limbu, Joe Huang, SungGyeong Bae, Christian Kurch, Begum Tutuncu, David Matthew Ezroj, Sweetmilkcoco, Raphaël LAURENT, Joe Meyers, Farah Abdelwahab, Brian Richards, Divina Grace Dar Santos, Jessie McGuire, Abdullah Altuwaijri, Sarah Burns, Clement, Hadi Salahshour, FAWWAZ GHUWAIDI, Dino Biancolini, Reagen O'Connor, Nicu Boanda, Cindy O., Karla Brilman, Jørgen Østerpart, Sergi Páez, rakesh Katragadda, Carolyn Corwin, Charlene You, Boris Langvand, Exal Enrique Cisneros Tuch, Carsten Tobehn, Kin Lon Ma, Katie Dean, Ezgi Yersu and Eunsun Kim.
Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen - Kenny Coogan Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen - Kenny Coogan
1 month ago En
Take a look inside a hive as a wasp queen begins her reign; founding a colony, hunting to feed her brood and defending against intruders. -- As the sun rises, something royal stirs inside a pile of firewood. It's the wasp queen; one of thousands who mated in late autumn and hibernated through the winter. Now she must emerge into the spring air to begin her reign. This queen is the lone survivor of her old hive, and now, she must become the foundress of a new one. Kenny Coogan details a year in the life of a wasp queen. Lesson by Kenny Coogan, directed by Biljana Labovic & animated by Denis Chapon. Animator's website: http://denischapon.com/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/licking-bees-and-pulping-trees-the-reign-of-a-wasp-queen-kenny-coogan Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Jan-Erik, Scott Markley, Kaitlyn holland, Elija Peterson, Michele Lynn Rose, Jai Prasanth, Vack91, David Lucsanyi, Xavier dupont, Marisa Miller, Boytsov Ilya, Steven Razey, Javier Aldavaz, Nathan Giusti, Mada Arslan, Joichiro Yamada, Ritul Raghavan, Aline de Paula Zillig, Yambu Ganesh Shaw, Abeer Rajbeen, John Hong, Minh Tran, Helen Lee, Anthony Benedict, Turine Tran, Mathew Samuel, Karthik Balsubramanian, Lee, Livia-Alexandra Sarban, Annastasshia Ames, João Henrique Rodrigues, Sebastiaan Hols, Aries SW, SANG HAN, Amy Lopez, ReuniteKorea , Vinh-Thuy Nguyen, Liz Candee, Clovis Norroy, Danielle Downs, Nik Maier, Angel Pantoja, Nishant Suneja, 张晓雨, Srinivasa C Pasumarthi, Kathryn Vacha, Anthony Arcis, Jeffrey Segrest, Sandra Fuller Bocko and Alex Pierce.
How bones make blood - Melody Smith How bones make blood - Melody Smith
1 month ago En
Dig into the science of how bone marrow transplants work and find out how you could become a donor by visiting https://bethematch.org -- Bones might seem rock-solid, but they’re actually quite porous inside. Most of the large bones of your skeleton have a hollow core filled with soft bone marrow. Marrow's most essential elements are blood stem cells and for patients with advanced blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, the best chance for a cure is often a bone marrow transplant. How does this procedure work? Melody Smith explains. Lesson by Melody Smith, directed by Artrake Studio. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-bones-make-blood-melody-smith Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! JackKeyton, Matthew D. Vigil, Amin Shahril, Adriano Fontes, Xiao Yu, Fatima Kried, Aravind Battaje, Melissa Suarez, Jason Duncan, Brian A. Dunn, Francisco Amaya, Daisuke Goto, Matt Switzler, Chhunheng Veng, Leonardo Monrroy, Sumedh Ghaisas, Guhten, Amer Harb, Dowey Baothman, Norbert Orgován, Shafeeq Ansari, Gabriel Balsa, Maryam Sultan, Bethany Connor, Jeremy Shimanek, Adam Foreman, Sebastiaan Vleugels, Lâm Nguyễn, Mark Byers, Bradley Heinold, Monkeypatcher, Laurence McMillan, Connor Roberts, Dmitry Neverov, Tonya Ratliff-Garrison, Avinash Amarnath, Eric McDaniel, Cristian Cristian, France Lipužič, EdoKun, Rare Media, Rayo, Faizan, Elizabeth Gu, Nazmul Idris, Po Foon Kwong, Siobhan O'Connor Gwozdz, NinjaBoffin, Jesse Jurman and Josue Perez Miranda.
Why is cotton in everything? - Michael R. Stiff Why is cotton in everything? - Michael R. Stiff
1 month ago En
Dig into the science of how cotton transforms from seed to fiber, and how these cotton fibers are used to make everything from fabrics, to currency, and fishing nets. -- Centuries ago, the Inca developed ingenuous suits of armor that could protect warriors from even the fiercest physical attacks. These hardy structures were made not from iron or steel, but rather something unexpectedly soft: cotton. Today cotton is used to make everything from fabric, to currency, diapers and fishing nets. Michael R. Stiff explores the science of what makes cotton so versatile. Lesson by Michael R. Stiff, directed by WOW-HOW Studio. Animator's website: https://wow-how.com/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-is-cotton-in-everything-michael-r-stiff Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Leen Mshasha, Mariana Ortega, Danny Romard, James Bruening, Ricki Daniel Marbun, Malcolm Callis, Sabrina Gonzalez, Al the Scottish Wildcat, سلطان الخليفي, Alexander Walls, Della Palacios, Vik Nagjee, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Adi V, Andrew Bosco, Craig Sheldon, Rishi Pasham, Joanne Luce, Jason A Saslow, Mary Sawyer, Scott Gass, Ruth Fang, Mayank Kaul, Kathryn J Hammond, Max Shuai Tang, Terry Minion, Sami Khan, Rob Johnson, Abdullah Abdulaziz, Angelo Urzua-Milla, Tommy Lewis, leorene , Mahina Bachiller, Marcus Andre Nery, Bruce Vieira Lopes, Chef, Charmaine Hanson, Michael Goldberg, Lydia Pflieger, Paul Aldred-Bann, Manav parmar, Susan Wang, Utkarsh Dubey, Thawsitt, Xuebicoco, Jezabel, Maeve, Kim Humphrey and Kristen Damas.
What was so special about Viking ships? - Jan Bill What was so special about Viking ships? - Jan Bill
1 month ago En
Explore the history and technology of Viking longships, which helped the Scandinavians conquer trade routes and new territories. -- As the Roman Empire flourished, Scandinavians had small settlements and no central government. Yet by the 11th century, they had spread far from Scandinavia, gaining control of trade routes throughout Europe, conquering kingdoms as far as Africa, and building outposts in North America. What was the secret to their success? Jan Bill dives into the history of the formidable Viking longship. Lesson by Jan Bill, directed by TOTEM Studio. Animator's website: https://www.totemstudio.tv Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-was-so-special-about-viking-ships-jan-bill Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Marc Bilodeau, Peng, Tzu-Hsiang, paul g mohney, Maya Toll, Sebastian Regez, Bruno Hannud, Andreas Voltios, Shubham Arora, Ugur Doga Sezgin, Akinola Emmanuel, Kyanta Yap, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Ana Maria, Benjamin & Shannon Pinder, Ernest Chow, Bela Namyslik, Alan Froese, Anika Westburg, Nick Cozby, Shawar Khan, Michael Braun-Boghos, Rohan Gupta, Elizabeth Cruz, Yujing Jiang, Sarah Lundegaard, Vladimir Ivanchenko, Georg Gusewski, Rohit Lodha, Erica Zhuang, Aaron Henson, Julio Sabatés Rodríguez, Vivian & Gilbert Lee, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, ரமணன், John simmons, June Reiling, Khalid AlAli, Mickey Mikeworth, Nathaniel Lupus, Yansong Li, Chung Wah Gnapp, Amber Alexander, Robert Patrick, Pi Guanghui, Barbara Younker, Ai Ejima, Soma Ali, Roman Pinchuk, Raheem and Hector Quintanilla.
Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen - Walter R. Tschinkel Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen - Walter R. Tschinkel
1 month ago En
Follow a queen fire ant as she builds a colony, protects it from neighboring ant armies and fends off would-be usurpers vying for her throne. -- In the spring, just after a heavy rainfall, male and female fire ants swarm the skies for a day of romance, known as the nuptial flight. Thousands of reproduction-capable ants take part in a mating frenzy, and for one successfully mated female, her work is only beginning. Walter R. Tschinkel details how the new queen builds a colony and protects it from neighboring ant armies. Lesson by Walter R. Tschinkel, directed by Lisa Vertudaches. Animator's website: https://lisavertudaches.com/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/mating-frenzies-sperm-hoards-and-brood-raids-the-life-of-a-fire-ant-queen-walter-r-tschinkel Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Ivan Todorović, Alex Schenkman, Brittiny Elman, Ryohky Araya, Paul Coupe, David Douglass, Ricardo Paredes, Bill Feaver, Eduardo Briceño, Arturo De Leon, Christophe Dessalles, Janie Jackson, Dr Luca Carpinelli, Heather Slater, Yuh Saito, Quentin Le Menez, Mattia Veltri, Fabian Amels, Sandra Tersluisen, PnDAA, Hugo Legorreta, Zhexi Shan, Gustavo Mendoza, Bárbara Nazaré, Josh Engel, Natalia Rico, Andrea Feliz, Eysteinn Guðnason, Bernardo Paulo, Victor E Karhel, Sydney Evans, Latora Slydell, Oyuntsengel Tseyen-Oidov, Noel Situ, Elliot Poulin, emily lam, Juan, Jordan Tang, Kent Logan, Alexandra Panzer, Laura Cameron Keith, Jen, Ellen Spertus, Cailin Ramsey, Markus Goldhacker, Leora Allen, Andras Radnothy, Chris, Arpita Singh and Vijayalakshmi.
The ballet that incited a riot - Iseult Gillespie The ballet that incited a riot - Iseult Gillespie
1 month ago En
Dive into the history and controversy of Igor Stravinsky’s ballet, “The Rite of Spring,” which shattered the conventions of classical ballet. -- Ballet is typically thought of as harmonious, graceful and polished— hardly something that would trigger a riot. But at the first performance of Igor Stravinsky's “The Rite of Spring,” audience members were so outraged that they drowned out the orchestra. People hurled objects at the stage, started fights and were arrested. What caused this shocking reaction? Iseult Gillespie explains the controversy. Lesson by Iseult Gillespie, directed by WOW-HOW Studio. Animator's website: https://www.wow-how.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-ballet-that-incited-a-riot-iseult-gillespie Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Christophe Dessalles, Janie Jackson, Dr Luca Carpinelli, Heather Slater, Yuh Saito, Quentin Le Menez, Mattia Veltri, Fabian Amels, Sandra Tersluisen, PnDAA, Hugo Legorreta, Zhexi Shan, Gustavo Mendoza, Bárbara Nazaré, Josh Engel, Natalia Rico, Andrea Feliz, Eysteinn Guðnason, Bernardo Paulo, Victor E Karhel, Sydney Evans, Latora Slydell, Oyuntsengel Tseyen-Oidov, Noel Situ, Elliot Poulin, emily lam, Juan, Jordan Tang, Kent Logan, Alexandra Panzer, Laura Cameron Keith, Jen, Ellen Spertus, Cailin Ramsey, Markus Goldhacker, Leora Allen, Andras Radnothy, Chris, Arpita Singh, Vijayalakshmi, Marc Bilodeau, Peng, Tzu-Hsiang, paul g mohney, Maya Toll, Sebastian Regez, Bruno Hannud, Andreas Voltios, Shubham Arora, Ugur Doga Sezgin and Akinola Emmanuel.
The Artists | Think Like A Coder, Ep 5 The Artists | Think Like A Coder, Ep 5
1 month ago En
The adventure continues! Episode 5: Ethic and Hedge arrive in the 198forest in search of the second artifact. Can they sneak past the guards to get to the tower? -- This is episode 5 of our animated series “Think Like A Coder.” This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. Lesson by Alex Rosenthal, directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio. Supported by Endless: https://endlessnetwork.com A special thank you to the programmers who assisted in the development of this series: Eric Wastl, Sara Kladky, Ryan Harvey, Dan Bernier, Eden Girma, Matt Gruskin, and James Griffith. Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-artists-think-like-a-coder-ep-5 Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Brandy Jones, Shawn Quichocho, Gi Nam Lee, Joy Love Om, Miloš Stevanović, Ghassan Alhazzaa, Yankai Liu, Pavel Zalevskiy, Claudia Mayfield, Stephanie Perozo, Joe Giamartino, Filip Dabrowski, Barbara Smalley, Megan Douglas, Tim Leistikow, Andrés Melo Gámez, Renhe Ji, Ka-Hei Law, Michal Salman, Peter Liu, Mark Morris, Catherine Sverko, Misaki Sato, Tan YH, Ph.D., Rodrigo Carballo, SookKwan Loong, Bev Millar, Merit Gamertsfelder, Lex Azevedo, Noa Shore, Taylor Hunter, Kyle Nguyen, MJ Tan Mingjie, Cristóbal Moenne, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Kevin Wong, Dawn Jordan, Yanira Santamaria, Prasanth Mathialagan, Savannah Scheelings, Susan Herder, Samuel Doerle, David Rosario, Dominik Kugelmann, Siamak H, Tracey Tobkin, Dwight Tevuk, Anthony Kudolo, Mrinalini and Yanuar Ashari.
Can you solve the dragon jousting riddle? - Alex Gendler Can you solve the dragon jousting riddle? - Alex Gendler
1 month ago En
Practice more problem-solving at https://brilliant.org/TedEd/ -- After years of war, the world’s kingdoms have come to an agreement. Every five years, teams representing the elves, goblins, and treefolk will compete in a grand tournament of dragon jousting. You have the important job of recording the scores for the inaugural tournament. But, you overslept and the games are already underway. Can you figure out the real score of each match? Alex Gendler shows how. Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Artrake Studio. This riddle is adapted from a puzzle that originally appeared in Puzzles for Pleasure, by E.R. Emmet. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-solve-the-dragon-jousting-riddle-alex-gendler Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Manognya Chakrapani, Ayala Ron, Samantha Chow, Philippe Spoden, Phyllis Dubrow, Michelle Stevens-Stanford, Cas Jamieson, Ophelia Gibson Best, Amber Wood, Paul Schneider, Jun Cai, Tim Robinson, Henrique 'Sorín' Cassús, cnorahs, Lyn-z Schulte, Elaine Fitzpatrick, Karthik Cherala, Clarence E. Harper Jr., Milad Mostafavi, Аркадий Скайуокер, Kiara Taylor, Louisa Lee, eden sher, Vignan Velivela, Sage Curie, Srikote Naewchampa, Tejas Dc, Khalifa Alhulail, Faiza Imtiaz, Martin Stephen, Jerome Froelich, Dan Paterniti, Jose Henrique Leopoldo e Silva, Mullaiarasu Sundaramurthy, Elnathan Joshua Bangayan, Caleb ross, Duo Xu, Quinn Shen, Marvin Vizuett, Sid, Marylise CHAUFFETON, Karen Goepen-Wee, Sama aafghani, Mandeep Singh, Abhijit Kiran Valluri, Morgan Williams, Kris Siverhus, Jason Weinstein, Tony Trapuzzano and Devin Harris.
The mysterious life and death of Rasputin - Eden Girma The mysterious life and death of Rasputin - Eden Girma
1 month ago En
Get to know the story of Rasputin, known as the “Mad Monk,” who was assassinated for his involvement with the Russian monarchy. -- On a night in 1916, Russian aristocrats set a plot of assassination into motion. If all went as planned, a man would be dead by morning, though others had already tried and failed. The monarchy was on the brink of collapse, and they believed this man was the single cause of it all. Who was he, and why was he to blame for the fate of an empire? Eden Girma explores the life of the notorious Rasputin. Lesson by Eden Girma, directed by Hype Studio. Animator's website: https://www.luisacopetti.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-myster... Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Nicolle Fieldsend-Roxborough, John Saveland, Jason Garcia, Robson Martinho, Martin Lau, Senjo Limbu, Joe Huang, SungGyeong Bae, Christian Kurch, Begum Tutuncu, David Matthew Ezroj, Sweetmilkcoco, Raphaël LAURENT, Joe Meyers, Farah Abdelwahab, Brian Richards, Divina Grace Dar Santos, Jessie McGuire, Abdullah Altuwaijri, Sarah Burns, Clement , Hadi Salahshour, FAWWAZ GHUWAIDI, Dino Biancolini, Reagen O'Connor, Nicu Boanda, Cindy O., Karla Brilman, Jørgen Østerpart, Sergi Páez, rakesh Katragadda, Carolyn Corwin, Charlene You, Boris Langvand, Exal Enrique Cisneros Tuch, Carsten Tobehn, Kin Lon Ma, Katie Dean, Ezgi Yersu, Eunsun Kim, Katrina Harding, Gerald Onyango, alessandra tasso, Astia Rizki Safitri, Côme Vincent, Antony Lee, Melissa Sorrells, Rakshit Kothari, Doreen Reynolds-Consolati and Simon Holst Ravn.
Could a breathalyzer detect cancer? - Julian Burschka Could a breathalyzer detect cancer? - Julian Burschka
1 month ago En
Discover how scientists are analyzing compounds in the breath to create a versatile breathalyzer capable of detecting disease. -- How is it that a breathalyzer can measure the alcohol content in someone’s blood, hours after they had their last drink, based on their breath alone? And could we use this same technology to detect disease by analyzing a person’s breath, without having to use more invasive diagnostic tools like biopsies, blood draws, and radiation? Julian Burschka details the complicated process. Lesson by Julian Burschka, directed by Cabong Studios. Animator's website: https://www.cabongstudios.com.br Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/could-a-breathalyzer-detect-cancer-julian-burschka Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Brighteagle, Beatriz Inácio, Mighterbump, Pamela Harrison, Maija Chapman, Liana Switzer, Curtis Light, The Brock, Dianne Palomar, Edgar Campos Barrachina, Maria Lerchbaumer, Ever Granada, Marin Kovachev, Ravi S. Rāmphal, Penelope Misquitta, Tekin Gültekin, Jhuval, Hans Peng, Gaurav Mathur, Erik Biemans, Tony, Michelle, Katie and Josh Pedretti, Vaibhav Mirjolkar, Thomas Bahrman, Allan Hayes, Aidan Forero, Uday Kishore, Mikhail Shkirev, Devesh Kumar, Sunny Patel, Anuj Tomar, Lowell Fleming, David Petrovič, Hoai Nam Tran, Stina Boberg, Alexandrina Danifeld, Kack-Kyun Kim, Travis Wehrman, haventfiguredout, Caitlin de Falco, Ken, zjweele13, Anna-Pitschna Kunz, Edla Paniguel, Elena Crescia, Thomas Mungavan, Alejandro Cachoua, Jaron Blackburn, Yoga Trapeze Wanderlust, Sandy Nasser and Venkat Venkatakrishnan.
Master the art of public speaking with TED Masterclass Master the art of public speaking with TED Masterclass
1 month ago En
Take the first step towards mastering the art of public speaking by checking out TED Masterclass, TED’s newest mobile app: http://bit.ly/TEDMasterclassApp -- At TED, we’re passionate about public speaking. Whether from a stage, over a podcast, in a classroom or at your workplace -- learning how to effectively share your best ideas creates opportunities for both you and your audience. TED Masterclass features a beautifully animated 11-lesson course, choice TED Talks that model the concepts covered in each lesson, and a continuous flow of exclusive insights from TED’s speaker coaching team. Learn how to identify, develop and share your best ideas in the form of TED-style Talks. If you’re on a smartphone, you can download the mobile app and preview every lesson in the course for free. And if you decide to purchase the full course, all proceeds will support the work of TED’s global education initiative, TED-Ed.
A brief history of alcohol - Rod Phillips A brief history of alcohol - Rod Phillips
1 month ago En
Trace the 7,000 year old history of alcohol, from its first known origins in China to cultures all over the world fermenting their own drinks. -- Nobody knows exactly when humans began to create fermented beverages. The earliest known evidence comes from 7,000 BCE in China, where residue in clay pots has revealed that people were making an alcoholic beverage from fermented rice, millet, grapes, and honey. So how did alcohol come to fuel global trade and exploration? Rod Phillips explores the evolution of alcohol. Lesson by Rod Phillips, directed by Anton Bogaty. Animator's website: https://www.instagram.com/anton_bogaty/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-brief-hi... Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Mauricio Basso, Athena Grace Franco, Tirath Singh Pandher, Melvin Williams, Tsz Hin Edmund Chan, Nicolas Silva, Raymond Lee, Kurt Almendras, Denise A Pitts, Abdallah Absi, Dee Wei, Richard A Berkley, Tim Armstrong, Daniel Nester, Hashem Al, denison martins fernandes, Doug Henry, Arlene Spiegelman, Michał Friedrich, Joshua Wasniewski, Maryam Dadkhah, Kristiyan Bonev, Keven Webb, Mihai Sandu, Deepak Iyer, Javid Gozalov, Emilia Alvarado, Jaime Arriola, Mirzat Tulafu, Lewis Westbury, Felipe Hoff, Rebecca Reineke, Cyrus Garay, Victoria Veretilo, Michael Aquilina, William Biersdorf, Patricia Alves Panagides, Valeria Sloan Vasquez, Mike Azarkman, Yvette Mocete, Pavel Maksimov, Victoria Soler-Roig, Betsy Feathers, Samuel Barbas, Therapist Gus, Sai Krishna Koyoda, Elizabeth Parker, William Bravante, Irindany Sandoval and Mark wisdom.
The philosophy of cynicism - William D. Desmond The philosophy of cynicism - William D. Desmond
2 months ago En
Explore the ancient Greek philosophy of cynicism, which calls for the rejection of materialism and conformity in favor of a simple life. -- In the 4th century BCE, a young Diogenes of Sinope was found to be counterfeiting coins. He was stripped of his citizenship, his money, all his possessions and sent into exile. He decided he would live self-sufficiently, close to nature, without materialism, vanity, or conformity and only then could he be truly free. William D. Desmond details how Diogenes gave rise to the philosophy of cynicism. Lesson by William D. Desmond, directed by Avi Ofer. Animator's website: https://www.aviofer.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-philosophy-of-cynicism-william-d-desmond Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Carlos H. Costa, Eimann P. Evarola, Aleksandr Lyozin, Mohamed Elsayed, Alan Wilder, Marcus Appelbaum, Francisco Leos, Kevin O'Leary, Les Howard, Ten Cha, Mehmet Yusuf Ertekin, Arlene Weston, phkphk123321, Jennifer Kurkoski, Ryan B Harvey, Austin Randall, Abhishek Bansal, Jayant Sahewal, Dian Atamyanov, igor romanenko, Jose Arcadio Valdes Franco, Brandy Sarver, Guy Hardy, Tu-Anh Nguyen, Karl Laius, Madee Lo, JY Kang, Marc Bou Zeid, Abhishek Goel, Charles A Hershberger, Coenraad Keuning, Robert Seik, Heidi Stolt, Alexis Hevia, Todd Gross, Brady Jones, Christina Salvatore, Zhong Ming Zenny Tan, Karisa Caudill, Bruno Pinho, Derek Drescher, Mihail Radu Pantilimon, Amin Shahril, Mohamed Elsayed, Barthélémy Michalon, Chumi Ogbonna, Karlee Finch, Mohammad Said, jj5252 and Kelvin Lam.
Why should you read “Dune” by Frank Herbert? - Dan Kwartler Why should you read “Dune” by Frank Herbert? - Dan Kwartler
2 months ago En
Discover Frank Herbert’s science fiction classic, “Dune,” which tells the story of a man catapulted into the middle of a planetary revolution. -- A mother and son trek across an endless desert. Wearing special suits to dissipate heat and recycle moisture, the travelers aren’t worried about dying of thirst. Their fears are much greater. Soon, the sound of the desert is drowned out by a hissing: a mound of sand 400 meters long bursts from the desert floor and races towards them. This is the world of “Dune.” Dan Kwartler dives into the epic story. Lesson by Dan Kwartler, directed by Recircle. Animator's website: https://www.recircle.net Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should-you-read-dune-by-frank-herbert-dan-kwartler Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Boytsov Ilya, Steven Razey, Javier Aldavaz, Nathan Giusti, Mada Arslan, Joichiro Yamada, Ritul Raghavan, Aline de Paula Zillig, Yambu Ganesh Shaw, Abeer Rajbeen, John Hong, Minh Tran, Helen Lee, Anthony Benedict, Turine Tran, Mathew Samuel, Karthik Balsubramanian, Lee, Livia-Alexandra Sarban, Annastasshia Ames, João Henrique Rodrigues, Sebastiaan Hols, Aries SW, SANG HAN, Amy Lopez, ReuniteKorea, Vinh-Thuy Nguyen, Liz Candee, Clovis Norroy, Danielle Downs, Nik Maier, Angel Pantoja, Nishant Suneja, 张晓雨, Srinivasa C Pasumarthi, Kathryn Vacha, Anthony Arcis, Jeffrey Segrest, Sandra Fuller Bocko, Alex Pierce, Lawrence Teh Swee Kiang, BRENDAN NEALE, Jane White, Karmi Nguyen, John C. Vesey, Yelena Baykova, Harshita Jagdish Sahijwani, Won Jang, Nick Johnson and Tariq Keblaoui.
Why should you read “The Joy Luck Club” by Amy Tan? - Sheila Marie Orfano Why should you read “The Joy Luck Club” by Amy Tan? - Sheila Marie Orfano
2 months ago En
Get to know Amy Tan’s novel “The Joy Luck Club,” a series of interconnected vignettes centered around four Chinese American families. -- In her Auntie An-mei’s home, Jing-Mei reluctantly takes her seat at the eastern corner of the mahjong table. At the north, south and west corners are her aunties, long-time members of the Joy Luck Club. This gathering is the point of departure for a series of interconnected vignettes in Amy Tan’s debut novel. Sheila Marie Orfano explores why the novel still captivates readers worldwide. Lesson by Sheila Marie Orfano, directed by Kayu Leung & Alo Trusz. Animator's websites: https://www.instagram.com/kayucaillou... https://www.instagram.com/alobluuu/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should... Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Francisco Amaya, Daisuke Goto, Matt Switzler, Chhunheng Veng, Leonardo Monrroy, Sumedh Ghaisas, Guhten, Amer Harb, Dowey Baothman, Norbert Orgován, Shafeeq Ansari, Gabriel Balsa, Maryam Sultan, Bethany Connor, Jeremy Shimanek, Adam Foreman, Sebastiaan Vleugels, Lâm Nguyễn, Mark Byers, Bradley Heinold, Monkeypatcher, Laurence McMillan, Connor Roberts, Dmitry Neverov, Tonya Ratliff-Garrison, Avinash Amarnath, Eric McDaniel, Cristian Cristian, France Lipužič, EdoKun, Rare Media, Rayo, Faizan, Elizabeth Gu, Nazmul Idris, Po Foon Kwong, Siobhan O'Connor Gwozdz, NinjaBoffin, Jesse Jurman, Josue Perez Miranda, Jan-Erik, Scott Markley, Kaitlyn holland, Elija Peterson, Michele Lynn Rose, Jai Prasanth, Vack91, David Lucsanyi, Xavier dupont and Marisa Miller.
Why should you read “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding? - Jill Dash Why should you read “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding? - Jill Dash
2 months ago En
Explore William Golding’s timeless satire, “Lord of the Flies,” which follows a group of shipwrecked boys as they descend into anarchy. -- After witnessing the atrocities of his fellow man in World War II, William Golding was losing his faith in humanity. Later, during the Cold War, as superpowers began threatening one another with nuclear annihilation, he was forced to interrogate the very roots of human nature and violence. These musings would inspire his first novel: “Lord of the Flies.” Jill Dash dives into the timeless satire. Lesson by Jill Dash, directed by Lucy Animation Studio. Animator's website: https://www.silviaprietov.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should-you-read-lord-of-the-flies-by-william-golding-jill-dash Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Della Palacios, Vik Nagjee, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Adi V, Andrew Bosco, Craig Sheldon, Rishi Pasham, Joanne Luce, Jason A Saslow, Mary Sawyer, Scott Gass, Ruth Fang, Mayank Kaul, Kathryn J Hammond, Max Shuai Tang, Terry Minion, Sami Khan, Rob Johnson, Abdullah Abdulaziz, Angelo Urzua-Milla, Tommy Lewis, leorene , Mahina Bachiller, Marcus Andre Nery, Bruce Vieira Lopes, Chef, Charmaine Hanson, Michael Goldberg, Lydia Pflieger, Paul Aldred-Bann, Manav parmar, Susan Wang, Utkarsh Dubey, Thawsitt , Xuebicoco, Jezabel, Maeve, Kim Humphrey, Kristen Damas, JackKeyton, Matthew D. Vigil, Amin Shahril, Adriano Fontes, Xiao Yu, Fatima Kried, Aravind Battaje, Melissa Suarez, Jason Duncan and Brian A. Dunn.
Hacking bacteria to fight disease - Tal Danino Hacking bacteria to fight disease - Tal Danino
2 months ago En
Explore how synthetic biologists are programming bacteria to fight cancer by manipulating their DNA. -- In 1884, an unlucky patient who had a rapidly growing cancer in his neck came down with an unrelated bacterial skin infection. As he recovered from the infection, the cancer surprisingly began to recede. The infection had stimulated the patient’s immune system. Today, synthetic biologists program bacteria to safely deliver drugs directly to tumors. How is this possible? Tal Danino investigates. Lesson by Tal Danino, directed by Chris Bishop. Animator's website: https://www.chrisbishopartist.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/hacking-bacteria-to-fight-cancer-tal-danino Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Kyanta Yap, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Ana Maria, Benjamin & Shannon Pinder, Ernest Chow, Bela Namyslik, Alan Froese, Anika Westburg, Nick Cozby, Shawar Khan, Michael Braun-Boghos, Rohan Gupta, Elizabeth Cruz, Yujing Jiang, Sarah Lundegaard, Vladimir Ivanchenko, Georg Gusewski, Rohit Lodha, Erica Zhuang, Aaron Henson, Julio Sabatés Rodríguez, Vivian & Gilbert Lee, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, ரமணன், John simmons, June Reiling, Khalid AlAli, Mickey Mikeworth, Nathaniel Lupus, Yansong Li, Chung Wah Gnapp, Amber Alexander, Robert Patrick, Pi Guanghui, Barbara Younker, Ai Ejima, Soma Ali, Roman Pinchuk, Raheem, Hector Quintanilla, Leen Mshasha, Mariana Ortega, Danny Romard, James Bruening, Ricki Daniel Marbun, Malcolm Callis, Sabrina Gonzalez, Al the Scottish Wildcat, سلطان الخليفي and Alexander Walls.
The Train Heist | Think Like A Coder, Ep 4 The Train Heist | Think Like A Coder, Ep 4
2 months ago En
The adventure continues! Episode 4: The trio plot how they can steal the first artifact— the Node of Power. Can they take it without being discovered? -- This is episode 4 of our animated series “Think Like A Coder.” This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. Lesson by Alex Rosenthal, directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio. Supported by Endless: https://endlessnetwork.com A special thank you to the programmers who assisted in the development of this series: Eric Wastl, Sara Kladky, Ryan Harvey, Dan Bernier, Eden Girma, Matt Gruskin, and James Griffith. And thanks to Eric Wastl, whose puzzle from the 2015 Advent of Code inspired the challenge in this episode. http://bit.ly/AdventOfCode1 Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-train-heist-think-like-a-coder-ep-4 Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Joe Giamartino, Filip Dabrowski, Barbara Smalley, Megan Douglas, Tim Leistikow, Andrés Melo Gámez, Renhe Ji, Ka-Hei Law, Michal Salman, Peter Liu, Mark Morris, Catherine Sverko, Misaki Sato, Tan YH, Ph.D., Rodrigo Carballo, SookKwan Loong, Bev Millar, Merit Gamertsfelder, Lex Azevedo, Noa Shore, Taylor Hunter, Kyle Nguyen, MJ Tan Mingjie, Cristóbal Moenne, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Kevin Wong, Dawn Jordan, Yanira Santamaria, Prasanth Mathialagan, Savannah Scheelings, Susan Herder, Samuel Doerle, David Rosario, Dominik Kugelmann, Siamak H, Tracey Tobkin, Dwight Tevuk, Anthony Kudolo, Mrinalini, Yanuar Ashari, Ivan Todorović, Alex Schenkman, Brittiny Elman, Ryohky Araya, Paul Coupe, David Douglass, Ricardo Paredes, Bill Feaver, Eduardo Briceño and Arturo De Leon.
How does chemotherapy work? - Hyunsoo Joshua No How does chemotherapy work? - Hyunsoo Joshua No
2 months ago En
Discover how chemotherapy drugs use cytotoxic agents to attack cancer cells and the impact they have on your body. -- During World War I, scientists were trying to develop an antidote to the poisonous yellow cloud known as mustard gas. They discovered the gas was irrevocably damaging the bone marrow of affected soldiers. This gave the scientists an idea: cancer cells and bone marrow both replicate rapidly. Could mustard gas be used to fight cancer? Hyunsoo No details the discovery and development of chemotherapy. Lesson by Hyunsoo Joshua No, directed by Artrake Studio. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-chemotherapy-work-hyunsoo-joshua-no Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Jun Cai, Tim Robinson, Henrique 'Sorín' Cassús, cnorahs , Lyn-z Schulte, Elaine Fitzpatrick, Karthik Cherala, Clarence E. Harper Jr., Milad Mostafavi, Аркадий Скайуокер, Kiara Taylor, Louisa Lee, eden sher, Vignan Velivela, Sage Curie, Srikote Naewchampa, Tejas Dc, Khalifa Alhulail, Faiza Imtiaz, Martin Stephen, Jerome Froelich, Dan Paterniti, Jose Henrique Leopoldo e Silva, Mullaiarasu Sundaramurthy, Elnathan Joshua Bangayan, Caleb ross, Duo Xu, Quinn Shen, Marvin Vizuett, Sid , Marylise CHAUFFETON, Karen Goepen-Wee, Sama aafghani, Mandeep Singh, Abhijit Kiran Valluri, Morgan Williams, Kris Siverhus, Jason Weinstein, Tony Trapuzzano, Devin Harris, Brandy Jones, Shawn Quichocho, Gi Nam Lee, Joy Love Om, Miloš Stevanović, Ghassan Alhazzaa, Yankai Liu, Pavel Zalevskiy, Claudia Mayfield and Stephanie Perozo.
Why doesn’t the Leaning Tower of Pisa fall over? - Alex Gendler Why doesn’t the Leaning Tower of Pisa fall over? - Alex Gendler
2 months ago En
Dig into the 800 year history and architecture of the Leaning Tower of Pisa and find out what gives the tower its infamous tilt. -- In 1990, the Italian government enlisted top engineers to stabilize Pisa’s famous Leaning Tower. There’d been many attempts during its 800 year history, but computer models revealed the urgency of their situation. The tower would topple if it reached an angle of 5.44 degrees— and it was currently leaning at 5.5. What gives the tower its infamous tilt? Alex Gendler explores the monument's history. Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Aim Creative Studios. Animator's website: https://www.aimcreativestudios.com Educator's website: https://www.londonvisionclinic.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-doesn-t-the-leaning-tower-of-pisa-fall-over-alex-gendler Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! David Matthew Ezroj, Sweetmilkcoco, Raphaël LAURENT, Joe Meyers, Farah Abdelwahab, Brian Richards, Divina Grace Dar Santos, Jessie McGuire, Abdullah Altuwaijri, Sarah Burns, Clement, Hadi Salahshour, FAWWAZ GHUWAIDI, Dino Biancolini, Reagen O'Connor, Nicu Boanda, Cindy O., Karla Brilman, Jørgen Østerpart, Sergi Páez, rakesh Katragadda, Carolyn Corwin, Charlene You, Boris Langvand, Exal Enrique Cisneros Tuch, Carsten Tobehn, Kin Lon Ma, Katie Dean, Ezgi Yersu, Eunsun Kim, Katrina Harding, Gerald Onyango, alessandra tasso, Astia Rizki Safitri, Côme Vincent, Antony Lee, Melissa Sorrells, Rakshit Kothari, Doreen Reynolds-Consolati, Simon Holst Ravn, Manognya Chakrapani, Ayala Ron, Samantha Chow, Philippe Spoden, Phyllis Dubrow, Michelle Stevens-Stanford, Cas Jamieson, Ophelia Gibson Best, Amber Wood and Paul Schneider.
Is marijuana bad for your brain? - Anees Bahji Is marijuana bad for your brain? - Anees Bahji
2 months ago En
Explore how marijuana’s two main active compounds, THC and CBD, affect your brain and body, and what risk factors to watch out for. -- In 1970, marijuana was classified as a schedule 1 drug in the United States: the strictest designation possible, meaning it was completely illegal and had no recognized medical uses. Today, marijuana’s therapeutic benefits are widely acknowledged, but a growing recognition for its medical value doesn’t answer the question: is recreational marijuana use bad for your brain? Anees Bahji investigates. Lesson by Anees Bahji, directed by Anton Bogaty. Animator's website: https://www.antonbogaty.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/is-marijuana-bad-for-your-brain-anees-bahji Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Maria Lerchbaumer, Ever Granada, Marin Kovachev, Ravi S. Rāmphal, Penelope Misquitta, Tekin Gültekin, Jhuval, Hans Peng, Gaurav Mathur, Erik Biemans, Tony, Michelle, Katie and Josh Pedretti, Vaibhav Mirjolkar, Thomas Bahrman, Allan Hayes, Aidan Forero, Uday Kishore, Mikhail Shkirev, Devesh Kumar, Sunny Patel, Anuj Tomar, Lowell Fleming, David Petrovič, Hoai Nam Tran, Stina Boberg, Alexandrina Danifeld, Kack-Kyun Kim, Travis Wehrman, haventfiguredout, Caitlin de Falco, Ken, zjweele13, Anna-Pitschna Kunz, Edla Paniguel, Elena Crescia, Thomas Mungavan, Alejandro Cachoua, Jaron Blackburn, Yoga Trapeze Wanderlust, Sandy Nasser, Venkat Venkatakrishnan, Nicolle Fieldsend-Roxborough, John Saveland, Jason Garcia, Robson Martinho, Martin Lau, Senjo Limbu, Joe Huang, SungGyeong Bae, Christian Kurch and Begum Tutuncu.
How corn conquered the world - Chris A. Kniesly How corn conquered the world - Chris A. Kniesly
3 months ago En
Trace the 9,000 year old history of the domestication of corn, or maize, and its effects on global agriculture. -- Corn currently accounts for more than one tenth of our global crop production. And over 99% of cultivated corn is the exact same type: Yellow Dent #2. This means that humans grow more Yellow Dent #2 than any other plant on the planet. So how did this single variety of this single plant become the biggest success story in agricultural history? Chris Kniesly investigates the rise of this wonder-crop. Lesson by Chris A. Kniesly, directed by Artrake Studio. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-corn-conquered-the-world-chris-a-kniesly Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Dee Wei, Richard A Berkley, Tim Armstrong, Daniel Nester, Hashem Al, denison martins fernandes, Doug Henry, Arlene Spiegelman, Michał Friedrich, Joshua Wasniewski, Maryam Dadkhah, Kristiyan Bonev, Keven Webb, Mihai Sandu, Deepak Iyer, Javid Gozalov, Emilia Alvarado, Jaime Arriola, Mirzat Tulafu, Lewis Westbury, Felipe Hoff, Rebecca Reineke, Cyrus Garay, Victoria Veretilo, Michael Aquilina, William Biersdorf, Patricia Alves Panagides, Valeria Sloan Vasquez, Mike Azarkman, Yvette Mocete, Pavel Maksimov, Victoria Soler-Roig, Betsy Feathers, Samuel Barbas, Therapist Gus, Sai Krishna Koyoda, Elizabeth Parker, William Bravante, Irindany Sandoval, Mark wisdom, Brighteagle, Beatriz Inácio, Mighterbump, Pamela Harrison, Maija Chapman, Liana Switzer, Curtis Light, The Brock, Dianne Palomar and Edgar Campos Barrachina.
Can you outsmart this logical fallacy? - Alex Gendler Can you outsmart this logical fallacy? - Alex Gendler
3 months ago En
Explore the psychology of the cognitive bias known as the conjunction fallacy, where we assume specific conditions are more probable than general ones. -- Meet Lucy. She was a math major in college, and aced all her courses in probability and statistics. Which do you think is more likely: that Lucy is a portrait artist, or that Lucy is a portrait artist who also plays poker? How do we know which statement is more likely to be true? Alex Gendler explores our tendency to look for shortcuts and the phenomenon known as the conjunction fallacy. Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Artrake Studio. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-you-outsmart-this-logical-fallacy-alex-gendler Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Mehmet Yusuf Ertekin, Arlene Weston, phkphk123321, Jennifer Kurkoski, Ryan B Harvey, Austin Randall, Abhishek Bansal, Jayant Sahewal, Dian Atamyanov, igor romanenko, Jose Arcadio Valdes Franco, Brandy Sarver, Guy Hardy, Tu-Anh Nguyen, Karl Laius, Madee Lo, JY Kang, Marc Bou Zeid, Abhishek Goel, Charles A Hershberger, Coenraad Keuning, Robert Seik, Heidi Stolt, Alexis Hevia, Todd Gross, Brady Jones, Christina Salvatore, Zhong Ming Zenny Tan, Karisa Caudill, Bruno Pinho, Derek Drescher, Mihail Radu Pantilimon, Amin Shahril, Mohamed Elsayed, Barthélémy Michalon, Chumi Ogbonna, Karlee Finch, Mohammad Said, jj5252, Kelvin Lam, Mauricio Basso, Athena Grace Franco, Tirath Singh Pandher, Melvin Williams, Tsz Hin Edmund Chan, Nicolas Silva, Raymond Lee, Kurt Almendras, Denise A Pitts and Abdallah Absi.
History's "worst" nun - Theresa A. Yugar History's "worst" nun - Theresa A. Yugar
3 months ago En
Get to know the life of Mexican nun, poet and scholar, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, who was censored by the Church for her critical writings. -- Juana Ramírez de Asbaje sat before a panel of prestigious theologians, jurists, and mathematicians. They had been invited to test Juana’s knowledge with the most difficult questions they could muster. But she successfully answered every challenge, from complicated equations to philosophical queries. Who was this impressive woman? Theresa Yugar details the life of the Mexican poet and scholar. Lesson by Theresa Yugar, directed by Wow-How Studio. Animator's website: https://www.wow-how.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/history-s-worst-nun-theresa-a-yugar Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! John Hong, Minh Tran, Helen Lee, Anthony Benedict, Turine Tran, Mathew Samuel, Karthik Balsubramanian, Lee , Livia-Alexandra Sarban, Annastasshia Ames, João Henrique Rodrigues, Sebastiaan Hols, Aries SW, SANG HAN, Amy Lopez, ReuniteKorea , Vinh-Thuy Nguyen, Liz Candee, Clovis Norroy, Danielle Downs, Nik Maier, Angel Pantoja, Nishant Suneja, 张晓雨, Srinivasa C Pasumarthi, Kathryn Vacha, Anthony Arcis, Jeffrey Segrest, Sandra Fuller Bocko, Alex Pierce, Lawrence Teh Swee Kiang, BRENDAN NEALE, Jane White, Karmi Nguyen, John C. Vesey, Yelena Baykova, Harshita Jagdish Sahijwani, Won Jang, Nick Johnson, Tariq Keblaoui, Carlos H. Costa, Eimann P. Evarola, Aleksandr Lyozin, Mohamed Elsayed, Alan Wilder, Marcus Appelbaum, Francisco Leos, Kevin O'Leary, Les Howard and Ten Cha.
How does laser eye surgery work? - Dan Reinstein How does laser eye surgery work? - Dan Reinstein
3 months ago En
Explore the eye-opening science of LASIK: corrective laser eye surgery that focuses on reshaping the cornea to fix blurry vision. -- In 1948, Spanish ophthalmologist Jose Ignacio Barraquer Moner was fed up with glasses. He wanted a solution for blurry vision that fixed the eye itself, without relying on external aids. The surgery he eventually devised was called “keratomileusis,” and his technique focused on reshaping the cornea— what we now know as LASIK. So how does laser eye surgery actually work? Dan Reinstein explains. Lesson by Dan Reinstein, directed by Hype CG. Animator's website: https://www.hype.cg Educator's website: https://www.londonvisionclinic.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-laser-eye-surgery-work-dan-reinstein Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Shafeeq Ansari, Gabriel Balsa, Maryam Sultan, Bethany Connor, Jeremy Shimanek, Adam Foreman, Sebastiaan Vleugels, Lâm Nguyễn, Mark Byers, Bradley Heinold, Monkeypatcher, Laurence McMillan, Connor Roberts, Dmitry Neverov, Tonya Ratliff-Garrison, Avinash Amarnath, Eric McDaniel, Cristian Cristian, France Lipužič, EdoKun, Rare Media, Rayo, Faizan, Elizabeth Gu, Nazmul Idris, Po Foon Kwong, Siobhan O'Connor Gwozdz, NinjaBoffin, Jesse Jurman, Josue Perez Miranda, Jan-Erik, Scott Markley, Kaitlyn holland, Elija Peterson, Michele Lynn Rose, Jai Prasanth, Vack91, David Lucsanyi, Xavier dupont, Marisa Miller, Boytsov Ilya, Steven Razey, Javier Aldavaz, Nathan Giusti, Mada Arslan, Joichiro Yamada, Ritul Raghavan, Aline de Paula Zillig, Yambu Ganesh Shaw and Abeer Rajbeen.
The Furnace Bots | Think Like A Coder, Ep 3 The Furnace Bots | Think Like A Coder, Ep 3
3 months ago En
The adventure continues! Episode 3: Ethic and Hedge must sabotage the furnace-bots to get to the first artifact. Can they find a way out? -- This is episode 3 of our animated series “Think Like A Coder.” This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. Lesson by Alex Rosenthal, directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio. Supported by Endless: https://endlessnetwork.com A special thank you to the programmers who assisted in the development of this series: Eric Wastl, Sara Kladky, Ryan Harvey, Dan Bernier, Eden Girma, Matt Gruskin, and James Griffith. And thanks to Eric Wastl, whose puzzle from the 2017 Advent of Code inspired the challenge in this episode. http://bit.ly/AdventOfCode7 Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-furnace-bots-think-like-a-coder-ep-3 Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Scott Gass, Ruth Fang, Mayank Kaul, Kathryn J Hammond, Max Shuai Tang, Terry Minion, Sami Khan, Rob Johnson, Abdullah Abdulaziz, Angelo Urzua-Milla, Tommy Lewis, leorene , Mahina Bachiller, Marcus Andre Nery, Bruce Vieira Lopes, Chef, Charmaine Hanson, Michael Goldberg, Lydia Pflieger, Paul Aldred-Bann, Manav parmar, Susan Wang, Utkarsh Dubey, Thawsitt, Xuebicoco, Jezabel, Maeve, Kim Humphrey, Kristen Damas, JackKeyton, Matthew D. Vigil, Amin Shahril, Adriano Fontes, Xiao Yu, Fatima Kried, Aravind Battaje, Melissa Suarez, Jason Duncan, Brian A. Dunn, Francisco Amaya, Daisuke Goto, Matt Switzler, Chhunheng Veng, Leonardo Monrroy, Sumedh Ghaisas, Guhten, Amer Harb, Dowey Baothman and Norbert Orgován.
The myth of Loki and the master builder - Alex Gendler The myth of Loki and the master builder - Alex Gendler
3 months ago En
Dive into the Norse myth of how Loki tricked a stranger into building the great wall of Asgard to keep the realm safe from giants. -- Asgard, a realm of wonders, was where the Norse Gods made their home. There Odin’s great hall of Valhalla towered above the mountains and Bifrost, the rainbow bridge, anchored itself. Though their domain was magnificent, it stood undefended from the giants and trolls who sought to destroy them. But a stranger appeared and made the gods an offer. Alex Gendler details the myth of the master builder. Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Hype CG. Animator's website: https://www.hype.cg Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-myth-of-loki-and-the-master-builder-alex-gendler Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Michael Braun-Boghos, Rohan Gupta, Elizabeth Cruz, Yujing Jiang, Sarah Lundegaard, Vladimir Ivanchenko, Georg Gusewski, Rohit Lodha, Erica Zhuang, Aaron Henson, Julio Sabatés Rodríguez, Vivian & Gilbert Lee, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, ரமணன், John simmons, June Reiling, Khalid AlAli, Mickey Mikeworth, Nathaniel Lupus, Yansong Li, Chung Wah Gnapp, Amber Alexander, Robert Patrick, Pi Guanghui, Barbara Younker, Ai Ejima, Soma Ali, Roman Pinchuk, Raheem, Hector Quintanilla, Leen Mshasha, Mariana Ortega, Danny Romard, James Bruening, Ricki Daniel Marbun, Malcolm Callis, Sabrina Gonzalez, Al the Scottish Wildcat, سلطان الخليفي, Alexander Walls, Della Palacios, Vik Nagjee, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Adi V, Andrew Bosco, Craig Sheldon, Rishi Pasham, Joanne Luce, Jason A Saslow and Mary Sawyer.
The dangers of mixing drugs - Céline Valéry The dangers of mixing drugs - Céline Valéry
3 months ago En
Explore the science of why mixing drugs and drug interactions with other substances can lead to dangerous health complications. -- Which of the following is risky behavior: a person taking cholesterol medicine with grapefruit juice? Or a person taking Acetaminophen before going out for drinks? Or a person on blood thinners who takes an aspirin? Turns out, all of them are risky. Each has inadvertently created a drug interaction that could lead to serious complications. Céline Valéry describes the dangers of mixing substances. Lesson by Céline Valéry, directed by Cabong Studios. Animator's website: https://www.cabongstudios.com.br/ Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-dangers-of-mixing-drugs-celine-valery Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Hugo Legorreta, Zhexi Shan, Gustavo Mendoza, Bárbara Nazaré, Josh Engel, Natalia Rico, Andrea Feliz, Eysteinn Guðnason, Bernardo Paulo, Victor E Karhel, Sydney Evans, Latora Slydell, Oyuntsengel Tseyen-Oidov, Noel Situ, Elliot Poulin, emily lam, Juan, Jordan Tang, Kent Logan, Alexandra Panzer, Laura Cameron Keith, Jen , Ellen Spertus, Cailin Ramsey, Markus Goldhacker, Leora Allen, Andras Radnothy, Chris, Arpita Singh, Vijayalakshmi, Marc Bilodeau, Peng, Tzu-Hsiang, paul g mohney, Maya Toll, Sebastian Regez, Bruno Hannud, Andreas Voltios, Shubham Arora, Ugur Doga Sezgin, Akinola Emmanuel, Kyanta Yap, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Ana Maria, Benjamin & Shannon Pinder, Ernest Chow, Bela Namyslik, Alan Froese, Anika Westburg, Nick Cozby and Shawar Khan.
Why do humans have a third eyelid? - Dorsa Amir Why do humans have a third eyelid? - Dorsa Amir
3 months ago En
Discover how evolution and natural selection influence why the human body has vestigial organs— body parts that no longer serve their original purpose. -- You know that little pink thing nestled in the corner of your eye? It’s actually the remnant of a third eyelid. In humans, it’s vestigial, meaning it no longer serves its original purpose. There are several other vestigial structures in the human body, quietly riding along from one of our ancestor species to the next. But why have they stuck around for so long? Dorsa Amir investigates. Lesson by Dorsa Amir, directed by Avi Ofer. Animator's website: https://www.aviofer.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-humans-have-a-third-eyelid-dorsa-amin Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Mark Morris, Catherine Sverko, Misaki Sato, Tan YH, Ph.D., Rodrigo Carballo, SookKwan Loong, Bev Millar, Merit Gamertsfelder, Lex Azevedo, Noa Shore, Taylor Hunter, Kyle Nguyen, MJ Tan Mingjie, Cristóbal Moenne, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Kevin Wong, Dawn Jordan, Yanira Santamaria, Prasanth Mathialagan, Savannah Scheelings, Susan Herder, Samuel Doerle, David Rosario, Dominik Kugelmann, Siamak H, Tracey Tobkin, Dwight Tevuk, Anthony Kudolo, Mrinalini , Yanuar Ashari, Ivan Todorović, Alex Schenkman, Brittiny Elman, Ryohky Araya, Paul Coupe, David Douglass, Ricardo Paredes, Bill Feaver, Eduardo Briceño, Arturo De Leon, Christophe Dessalles, Janie Jackson, Dr Luca Carpinelli, Heather Slater, Yuh Saito, Quentin Le Menez, Mattia Veltri, Fabian Amels, Sandra Tersluisen and PnDAA.
Why haven’t we cured arthritis? - Kaitlyn Sadtler and Heather J. Faust Why haven’t we cured arthritis? - Kaitlyn Sadtler and Heather J. Faust
3 months ago En
Get to know the science behind what causes the stiff, creaky joints of the most common forms of arthritis and what you can do to prevent it. -- The bad backs, elbow pain, and creaky knees so common in older people often aren't just “old age.” In fact, the source of this stiffness plagues many young people as well. The culprit is arthritis: a condition that affects over 90 million people in the U.S. alone. What makes arthritis so pervasive, and why haven’t we found a cure for it? Kaitlyn Sadtler and Heather J. Faust investigate. Lesson by Kaitlyn Sadtler and Heather J. Faust, directed by CUB Animation. Animator's website: https://www.cubanimation.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-haven-t-we-cured-arthritis-kaitlyn-sadtler-and-heather-j-faust Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Kiara Taylor, Louisa Lee, eden sher, Vignan Velivela, Sage Curie, Srikote Naewchampa, Tejas Dc, Khalifa Alhulail, Faiza Imtiaz, Martin Stephen, Jerome Froelich, Dan Paterniti, Jose Henrique Leopoldo e Silva, Mullaiarasu Sundaramurthy, Elnathan Joshua Bangayan, Caleb ross, Duo Xu, Quinn Shen, Marvin Vizuett, Sid, Marylise CHAUFFETON, Karen Goepen-Wee, Sama aafghani, Mandeep Singh, Abhijit Kiran Valluri, Morgan Williams, Kris Siverhus, Jason Weinstein, Tony Trapuzzano, Devin Harris, Brandy Jones, Shawn Quichocho, Gi Nam Lee, Joy Love Om, Miloš Stevanović, Ghassan Alhazzaa, Yankai Liu, Pavel Zalevskiy, Claudia Mayfield, Stephanie Perozo, Joe Giamartino, Filip Dabrowski, Barbara Smalley, Megan Douglas, Tim Leistikow, Andrés Melo Gámez, Renhe Ji, Ka-Hei Law, Michal Salman and Peter Liu.
Game theory challenge: can you predict human behavior? - Lucas Husted Game theory challenge: can you predict human behavior? - Lucas Husted
3 months ago En
Solve this classic game theory challenge: given integers from 0 to 100, what would the whole number closest to ⅔ of the average of all numbers guessed be? -- Given a range of integers from 0 to 100, what would the whole number closest to 2/3 of the average of all numbers guessed be? For example, if the average of all guesses is 60, the correct guess will be 40. The game is played under conditions known to game theorists as “common knowledge:” every player has the same information— they also know that everyone else does too. Lucas Husted explains. Lesson by Lucas Husted, directed by Anton Trofimov. Animator's website: https://www.antontrofimov.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/game-theory-challenge-can-you-predict-human-behavior-lucas-husted Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Clement, Hadi Salahshour, FAWWAZ GHUWAIDI, Dino Biancolini, Reagen O'Connor, Nicu Boanda, Cindy O., Karla Brilman, Jørgen Østerpart, Sergi Páez, rakesh Katragadda, Carolyn Corwin, Charlene You, Boris Langvand, Exal Enrique Cisneros Tuch, Carsten Tobehn, Kin Lon Ma, Katie Dean, Ezgi Yersu, Eunsun Kim, Katrina Harding, Gerald Onyango, alessandra tasso, Astia Rizki Safitri, Côme Vincent, Antony Lee, Melissa Sorrells, Rakshit Kothari, Doreen Reynolds-Consolati, Simon Holst Ravn, Manognya Chakrapani, Ayala Ron, Samantha Chow, Philippe Spoden, Phyllis Dubrow, Michelle Stevens-Stanford, Cas Jamieson, Ophelia Gibson Best, Amber Wood, Paul Schneider, Jun Cai, Tim Robinson, Henrique 'Sorín' Cassús, cnorahs, Lyn-z Schulte, Elaine Fitzpatrick, Karthik Cherala, Clarence E. Harper Jr., Milad Mostafavi and Аркадий Скайуокер.
The Taino myth of the cursed creator - Bill Keegan The Taino myth of the cursed creator - Bill Keegan
3 months ago En
Dive into the Taino myth of the sea, and watch as Deminan and his brothers accidentally create a new world from a giant gourd. -- Before the world of humans began, there was the world of the gods. Four brothers wandered this celestial realm. One day, the brothers snuck into a spirit’s house and spotted a giant gourd hanging in the corner. But as they tried to look inside the gourd, they dropped it. It broke apart, releasing a deluge that formed a new world. Bill Keegan details the Taino myth of Deminan and the sea. Lesson by Bill Keegan, directed by Franz Palomares. Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-taino-myth-of-the-cursed-creator-bill-keegan Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Tony, Michelle, Katie and Josh Pedretti, Vaibhav Mirjolkar, Thomas Bahrman, Allan Hayes, Aidan Forero, Uday Kishore, Mikhail Shkirev, Devesh Kumar, Sunny Patel, Anuj Tomar, Lowell Fleming, David Petrovič, Hoai Nam Tran, Stina Boberg, Alexandrina Danifeld, Kack-Kyun Kim, Travis Wehrman, haventfiguredout, Caitlin de Falco, Ken, zjweele13, Anna-Pitschna Kunz, Edla Paniguel, Elena Crescia, Thomas Mungavan, Alejandro Cachoua, Jaron Blackburn, Yoga Trapeze Wanderlust, Sandy Nasser, Venkat Venkatakrishnan, Nicolle Fieldsend-Roxborough, John Saveland, Jason Garcia, Robson Martinho, Martin Lau, Senjo Limbu, Joe Huang, SungGyeong Bae, Christian Kurch, Begum Tutuncu, David Matthew Ezroj, Sweetmilkcoco, Raphaël LAURENT, Joe Meyers, Farah Abdelwahab, Brian Richards, Divina Grace Dar Santos, Jessie McGuire, Abdullah Altuwaijri and Sarah Burns.
Are the illuminati real? - Chip Berlet Are the illuminati real? - Chip Berlet
3 months ago En
Download a free audiobook version of "The Pillars of the Earth" and support TED-Ed's nonprofit mission: https://www.audible.com/ted-ed Check out our full book recommendation: https://shop.ed.ted.com/collections/ted-ed-book-recommendations/products/illuminati -- The year was 1776. In Bavaria, new ideals of rationalism, religious freedom and universal human rights competed with the Catholic church’s heavy influence over public affairs. Adam Weishaupt, a law professor frustrated with the Church’s ideology, decided to spread his ideas through a secret society: the Illuminati. Chip Berlet dives into the history, ideals and rituals of the infamous group. Lesson by Chip Berlet, directed by Brett Underhill. Animator's website: https://www.porkchopbob.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/are-the-illuminati-real-chip-berlet Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Maryam Dadkhah, Kristiyan Bonev, Keven Webb, Mihai Sandu, Deepak Iyer, Javid Gozalov, Emilia Alvarado, Jaime Arriola, Mirzat Tulafu, Lewis Westbury, Felipe Hoff, Rebecca Reineke, Cyrus Garay, Victoria Veretilo, Michael Aquilina, William Biersdorf, Patricia Alves Panagides, Valeria Sloan Vasquez, Mike Azarkman, Yvette Mocete, Pavel Maksimov, Victoria Soler-Roig, Betsy Feathers, Samuel Barbas, Therapist Gus, Sai Krishna Koyoda, Elizabeth Parker, William Bravante, Irindany Sandoval, Mark wisdom, Brighteagle, Beatriz Inácio, Mighterbump, Pamela Harrison, Maija Chapman, Liana Switzer, Curtis Light, The Brock, Dianne Palomar, Edgar Campos Barrachina, Maria Lerchbaumer, Ever Granada, Marin Kovachev, Ravi S. Rāmphal, Penelope Misquitta, Tekin Gültekin, Jhuval, Hans Peng, Gaurav Mathur and Erik Biemans.
Claws vs. nails - Matthew Borths Claws vs. nails - Matthew Borths
4 months ago En
Discover the evolutionary purpose of nails, and explore the theories of why they evolved from claws over 55 million years ago. -- Consider the claw. Frequently found on animals around the world, it’s one of nature’s most versatile tools. Bears use claws for digging as well as defense. An eagle’s needle-like talons can pierce the skulls of their prey. Even the ancestors of primates used to wield these impressive appendages, until their claws evolved into nails. So what caused this adaptation? Matthew Borths investigates. Lesson by Matthew Borths, directed by Augenblick Studios. Animator's website: https://www.augenblickstudios.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/claws-vs-nails-matthew-borths Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Jose Arcadio Valdes Franco, Brandy Sarver, Guy Hardy, Tu-Anh Nguyen, Karl Laius, Madee Lo, JY Kang, Marc Bou Zeid, Abhishek Goel, Charles A Hershberger, Coenraad Keuning, Robert Seik, Heidi Stolt, Alexis Hevia, Todd Gross, Brady Jones, Christina Salvatore, Zhong Ming Zenny Tan, Karisa Caudill, Bruno Pinho, Derek Drescher, Mihail Radu Pantilimon, Amin Shahril, Mohamed Elsayed, Barthélémy Michalon, Chumi Ogbonna, Karlee Finch, Mohammad Said, jj5252, Kelvin Lam, Mauricio Basso, Athena Grace Franco, Tirath Singh Pandher, Melvin Williams, Tsz Hin Edmund Chan, Nicolas Silva, Raymond Lee, Kurt Almendras, Denise A Pitts, Abdallah Absi, Dee Wei, Richard A Berkley, Tim Armstrong, Daniel Nester, Hashem Al, denison martins fernandes, Doug Henry, Arlene Spiegelman, Michał Friedrich and Joshua Wasniewski.
How close are we to uploading our minds? - Michael S.A. Graziano How close are we to uploading our minds? - Michael S.A. Graziano
4 months ago En
Investigate the possibility of scanning the human brain and uploading our minds and consciousness to a digital world. -- Imagine a future where nobody dies— instead, our minds are uploaded to a digital world. There they could live on in a realistic, simulated environment with avatar bodies, calling in and contributing to the biological world. Mind-uploading has powerful appeal— but what would it actually take to scan a person’s brain and upload their mind? Michael S. A. Graziano explores the challenges. Lesson by Michael S. A. Graziano, directed by Lobster Studio. Animator's website: https://www.lobsterstudio.tv Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-close-are-we-to-uploading-our-minds-michael-s-a-graziano Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! João Henrique Rodrigues, Sebastiaan Hols, Aries SW, SANG HAN, Amy Lopez, ReuniteKorea, Vinh-Thuy Nguyen, Liz Candee, Clovis Norroy, Danielle Downs, Nik Maier, Angel Pantoja, Nishant Suneja, 张晓雨, Srinivasa C Pasumarthi, Kathryn Vacha, Anthony Arcis, Jeffrey Segrest, Sandra Fuller Bocko, Alex Pierce, Lawrence Teh Swee Kiang, BRENDAN NEALE, Jane White, Karmi Nguyen, John C. Vesey, Yelena Baykova, Harshita Jagdish Sahijwani, Won Jang, Nick Johnson, Tariq Keblaoui, Carlos H. Costa, Eimann P. Evarola, Aleksandr Lyozin, Mohamed Elsayed, Alan Wilder, Marcus Appelbaum, Francisco Leos, Kevin O'Leary, Les Howard, Ten Cha, Mehmet Yusuf Ertekin, Arlene Weston, phkphk123321, Jennifer Kurkoski, Ryan B Harvey, Austin Randall, Abhishek Bansal, Jayant Sahewal, Dian Atamyanov and igor romanenko.
The Greek myth of Talos, the first robot - Adrienne Mayor The Greek myth of Talos, the first robot - Adrienne Mayor
4 months ago En
Get to know the myth of Talos, a robot powered by ichor and created by Hephaestus to defend the island kingdom of Crete from intruders. -- Hephaestus, god of technology, was hard at work on his most ingenious invention yet. He was creating a new defense system for King Minos, who wanted fewer intruders on his island kingdom of Crete. But mortal guards and ordinary weapons wouldn’t suffice, so the visionary god devised an indomitable new defender. Adrienna Mayor dives into the myth of Talos: the first robot. Lesson by Adrienne Mayor, directed by Cabong Studios. Animator's website: https://www.cabongstudios.com.br Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-greek-myth-of-talos-the-first-robot-adrienne-mayor Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Monkeypatcher, Laurence McMillan, Connor Roberts, Dmitry Neverov, Tonya Ratliff-Garrison, Avinash Amarnath, Eric McDaniel, Cristian Cristian, France Lipužič, EdoKun, Rare Media, Rayo, Faizan , Elizabeth Gu, Nazmul Idris, Po Foon Kwong, Siobhan O'Connor Gwozdz, NinjaBoffin, Jesse Jurman, Josue Perez Miranda, Jan-Erik, Scott Markley, Kaitlyn holland, Elija Peterson, Michele Lynn Rose, Jai Prasanth, Vack91, David Lucsanyi, Xavier dupont, Marisa Miller, Boytsov Ilya, Steven Razey, Javier Aldavaz, Nathan Giusti, Mada Arslan, Joichiro Yamada, Ritul Raghavan, Aline de Paula Zillig, Yambu Ganesh Shaw, Abeer Rajbeen, John Hong, Minh Tran, Helen Lee, Anthony Benedict, Turine Tran, Mathew Samuel, Karthik Balsubramanian, Lee, Livia-Alexandra Sarban and Annastasshia Ames.
Hawking's black hole paradox explained - Fabio Pacucci Hawking's black hole paradox explained - Fabio Pacucci
4 months ago En
Where does quantum information go when it enters a black hole? Investigate the theories of the black hole information paradox. -- Today, one of the biggest paradoxes in the universe threatens to unravel modern science: the black hole information paradox. Every object in the universe is composed of particles with unique quantum properties and even if an object is destroyed, its quantum information is never permanently deleted. But what happens to that information when an object enters a black hole? Fabio Pacucci investigates. Lesson by Fabio Pacucci, directed by Artrake Studio. Animator's website: https://www.artrake.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/hawking-s-black-hole-paradox-explained-information-paradox Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Angelo Urzua-Milla, Tommy Lewis, leorene, Mahina Bachiller, Marcus Andre Nery, Bruce Vieira Lopes, Chef, Charmaine Hanson, Michael Goldberg, Lydia Pflieger, Paul Aldred-Bann, Manav parmar, Susan Wang, Utkarsh Dubey, Thawsitt, Xuebicoco, Jezabel, Maeve, Kim Humphrey, Kristen Damas, JackKeyton, Matthew D. Vigil, Amin Shahril, Adriano Fontes, Xiao Yu, Fatima Kried, Aravind Battaje, Melissa Suarez, Jason Duncan, Brian A. Dunn, Francisco Amaya, Daisuke Goto, Matt Switzler, Chhunheng Veng, Leonardo Monrroy, Sumedh Ghaisas, Guhten, Amer Harb, Dowey Baothman, Norbert Orgován, Shafeeq Ansari, Gabriel Balsa, Maryam Sultan, Bethany Connor, Jeremy Shimanek, Adam Foreman, Sebastiaan Vleugels, Lâm Nguyễn, Mark Byers and Bradley Heinold.
The Mayan myth of the morning star The Mayan myth of the morning star
4 months ago En
Discover the Mayan myth of Venus, the morning star plotting revenge on his brother, the sun, and his allies. -- Chak Ek’, the morning star, rose from the underworld to the surface of the eastern sea and on into the heavens. His brother K’in Ahaw, the sun, followed. Though Chak Ek’ had risen first, K’in Ahaw outshone him, and the resentful Chak Ek’ descended back to the underworld to plot against his brother and his allies. Gabrielle Vail details the Mayan myth of the morning star. Lesson by Gabrielle Vail, directed by Basa. Animator's website: https://www.basaestudio.com Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-mayan-myth-of-the-morning-star Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Julio Sabatés Rodríguez, Vivian & Gilbert Lee, Fahad Nasser Chowdhury, ரமணன், John simmons, June Reiling, Khalid AlAli, Mickey Mikeworth, Nathaniel Lupus, Yansong Li, Chung Wah Gnapp, Amber Alexander, Robert Patrick, Pi Guanghui, Barbara Younker, Ai Ejima, Soma Ali, Roman Pinchuk, Raheem, Hector Quintanilla, Leen Mshasha, Mariana Ortega, Angelo Urzua-Milla, Danny Romard, James Bruening, Ricki Daniel Marbun, Malcolm Callis, Sabrina Gonzalez, Al the Scottish Wildcat, سلطان الخليفي, Alexander Walls, Della Palacios, Vik Nagjee, Hiroshi Uchiyama, Adi V, Andrew Bosco, Craig Sheldon, Rishi Pasham, Joanne Luce, Jason A Saslow, Mary Sawyer, Scott Gass, Ruth Fang, Mayank Kaul, Kathryn J Hammond, Max Shuai Tang, Terry Minion, Sami Khan, Rob Johnson and Abdullah Abdulaziz.
How to 3D print human tissue - Taneka Jones How to 3D print human tissue - Taneka Jones
4 months ago En
Explore the science of bioprinting, a type of 3D printing that uses bioink, a printable material that contains living cells. -- There are currently hundreds of thousands of people on transplant lists, waiting for critical organs like kidneys, hearts and livers that could save their lives. Unfortunately, there aren’t enough donor organs available to fill that demand. What if, instead of waiting, we could create new, customized organs from scratch? Taneka Jones explores bioprinting, a new branch of regenerative medicine. Lesson by Taneka Jones, directed by Hype CG. Animator's website: https://www.hype.cg Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-3d-print-human-tissue-taneka-jones Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Sydney Evans, Latora Slydell, Oyuntsengel Tseyen-Oidov, Noel Situ, Elliot Poulin, emily lam, Juan, Jordan Tang, Kent Logan, Alexandra Panzer, Laura Cameron Keith, Jen, Ellen Spertus, Cailin Ramsey, Markus Goldhacker, Leora Allen, Andras Radnothy, Chris, Arpita Singh, Vijayalakshmi, Marc Bilodeau, Peng, Tzu-Hsiang, paul g mohney, Maya Toll, Sebastian Regez, Bruno Hannud, Andreas Voltios, Shubham Arora, Ugur Doga Sezgin, Akinola Emmanuel, Kyanta Yap, Ricardo Rendon Cepeda, Ana Maria, Benjamin & Shannon Pinder, Ernest Chow, Bela Namyslik, Alan Froese, Anika Westburg, Nick Cozby, Shawar Khan, Michael Braun-Boghos, Rohan Gupta, Elizabeth Cruz, Yujing Jiang, Sarah Lundegaard, Vladimir Ivanchenko, Georg Gusewski, Rohit Lodha, Erica Zhuang and Aaron Henson.
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